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Full text of "Pacific Oil Reporter (1903-1904)"

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Endorsed by the California Petroleum Miners' Association. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1908. 



Vol. 5. No. 1. 



Price 10 Cents. 



OIL WCS*LrSUPPLY CO. 

P1TTSBUB GH, PA. 

MANUFACTURE EVERYTHING REQUIRED 

To Drill, Equip and Operate OIL, GAS and WATER WELLS 
BOILERS, ENGINES, DRILLING and FISHING TOOLS 
MANILA & WIRE ROPE, CASING, TUBING, DRIVE & LINE PIPE 

COMBINATION OUTFITS 

INTERCHANGEABLE FROM STANDARD CABLE DRILLING TO THE 
HYDRAULIC ROTARY SYSTEM, SHIFT MADE IN A FEW MOMENTS 
FROM ONB SYSTEM TO THE OTHER. 

CABLB SYSTEM FOR HARD ROCK FORMATIONS, HYDRAULIC SYSTEM 
FOR QUICKSAND & CLAY, COMBINATION OUTFITS lor any condition. 





IMPERIAL WORKS, Oil City, Pa., one of the OIL WELL SUPPLY CO.'S numerous Man'f'g Plants. 





THE COLUMBIA STEEL DULLER. 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 






ESTABLISHED 1657 



LESCHEN'S 
DRILLING CABLES 
A % SAND LINES. 
A ^o CASING*Nt>TUBING LINES. 



WIRE A ROPE 



OF EVERY 
[DESCRIPTION 



A.LESCHEN CSONS RO. 

920-922vNORTH Fl R ST ST. 
930-332-' ST. LOU IS, MO. 

'•■-] 'BRANCH OrriCES 

.'■' : '• . - : ' : : 5.: V^A.R EHOUSES: 

\NEyy yaRjf , .... . Denver 

/^^".if.^TRE S+.\ : .;, 1717-23 ARAPAHOE S 

I CHICAGO SAN FRANCI5C0 



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137 E. LAKE ST. 



RIALTO BLOC. 



The REPUTATION, 



we have made for our 



ASPHALT 



Js UNEXCELLED 

WHY? Because years of experience have taught us how to 
make it THE BEST. 

nnnnna 

Our product is known to all large Contractors ; You can 

tread on it in New York, as well as in San 

Francisco. We also ship it to 

Canada and abroad. 



REGARDING 
PRICES: 



We can AT LEAST meet any quotation 
made for good ASPHALT. WHY ? 
Because we own miles of oil territory in 
Sunset District and pipe the oil from our 
wells direct to our refinery. We handle it from the well to the car. 

nannoD 

Will be pleased to send samples and quotation on all grades 
from Liquid to the very Hardest. 



JEWETT & BLODGET, 

BAKERSFIELD, CAL. 



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S ANNOUNCEMENT 



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NEW TYPEWRITERS 

RENTED and SOLD 

L. & M, Alexander & Co. 

110 Montgomery St., 6. F. 

8®" Ask for New Booklet; "The New L. C. 
Smith Visible Typewriter." 




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HIGH GRADE REFINED ASPHALTM 

Roofing and Paving Asphalt 

Engine and Stove Distillate 

Immediate Delivery, Finest Quality, Best Prices 

COLUMBIAN 

Oil, Asphalt and Refining Company 

Office : Refinery and Works : 

226 Crocker Building, Carpenteria, 

San Francisco, Cal. Cal. 



The National Oil Refining Co. 

Refiners of Crude Petroleum. Manufacturers of 
High-Grade Asphaltum. Illuminating, Lubricating 
and Neutral Oils. Stove Distillates, Etc. 

238 & 229 Parrott Building 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone South 802 Works: Rodeo, Contra Costa Co., Cal. 



13894r> 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 5. No. i. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 7. IQ03. 



Prick, Ten Cents. 



DA PI TIP nil DFDfiDTlTD f 000 ^ 00 ***^ ** 00 ^** 000 ^ 00 ^^ 

The Sunset=Midway=McKittrick Field 



Plibllah.d W..LI, 

The 00 Aatborttr of ibe Pacific Coaat. 

K»« W — * Bj California P.lroJ.o- >1 Intra' Aaaoclatlon 



MRS. MARIA ROSA WINN, Proprietor. 
K. S. BASTMAN, 

Editor mod Bualoeaa Manager 



Officb alto Kditorial Rooua 

318 Pine Street. San Francisco, California 

Telephone. Bush 176. 



TKRMS 

Out Yui $150 

Six Months 1 50 

T*ia«B Momthi 1 00 

Si iou Conn. 10c 

STRICTLY IN ADVA.NCB 



HoifVT should be seut by Postal Order, Draft >r Registered 
Letter, addressed to Paci6c OH Reporter, 318 Pine street, San 
Francisco, rooms )i 32-33. Communications must be accompanied by 
writer's name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a roar* a tee of .rood faith. 



Kntered in the Postoffice at San PrancJaco, California, as second- 
clasa matter. 



ANNOUNCEMENT, 



As stated at the time, our assuming the edi- 
torial duties of this paper was only a tem- 
porary matter. Other duties demand our 
whole attention and we have remained until 
such a time as other arrangements could be 
made to carry on the editorial work. The 
proprietor Is fortunate in securing the ser- 
vices of E. S. Eastman, who has had more or 
less connection with the editorial work of the 
paper for some time past, first as Wyoming 
correspondent, and more recently as field 
representative. Mr. Eastman is a young man 
of energy and ability and the patrons of the 
paper are to be congratulated that it has been 
placed under the control of one thoroughly 
familiar with the oil Industry and capable of 
keeping it up to its well-deserved standard of 
excellence and reliability. 

U. M. Thomas. 



I Bright Outlook Jop This Important OH District—Great 

Activity on Every Side. | 

OOOOC^OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOWWOOOW^ 0000000000 

H. A. Blodget has been associated with Mr. 
Jewett for the past twenty-four years, for- 
merly occupying the position of bookkeeper, 
cashier, and later becoming the junior part- 



Read the history of any great oil field or 
mining camp and you will find that, as an al- 
most invariable rule, the men who make the 
discoveries and do the hard pioneering work 
are not the men to profit thereby ; usually 
selling out for a song or abandoning the enter- 
prise altogether before the time for profit has 
arrived. One exception to the rule, however, 
is the Sunset field. Messrs. Jewett & Blodget 
were the pioneers. They came with a full 
determination to stay with their enterprise. 
They did stay, and today are holding in fee 



JEWETT & BLODGET PIPE LINE. 




ner of the firm of Jewett & Blodget, the Jewett 
& Blodget Oil company, and a heavy stock- 
holder in the Jewett-Blodget-Beal and many 
other oil companies operating In the Sunset 
district; president of the Operator's Oil com- 
pany, president of the Bakersfield & Kern 
electric railway and many other honorable 
and lucrative positions. 



SOLOMON JEWETT. 



\ 



This edition of the Pacific Oil Reporter 
will be a revelation to those unacquainted 
with the development of the Sunset, Midway 
and McKittrick oil fields .McKlttrick has had 
transportation facilities for several years and 
the immense storage tanks of the Standard, 
Southern Pacific and Associated Oil com- 
panies and pipe lines connected with the 
property of all the producing companies shows 
a marked degree of activity. It is principally 
the Sunset and Midway districts that are to be 
benefitted by the Jewett & Blodget pipe line, 
on which work will be commenced by the 
time this edition goes to press. The Import- 
ance of this pipe line Is almost beyond the 
conception of those not familiar with condi- 
tions, but can better be imagined when we 
say that over three millions of dollars has 
been expended in development work in the 
Isolated district without the transportation 
to market a dollar's worth of oil, although 
the capacity of that district is more than 
50,000 barrels daily. With the advent of the 
pipe line, which will traverse the heart of the 
oil producing territory, an air of activity pre- 
vails that will soon place this Important dis- 
trict among the foremost in the state. 

The Pacific Oil Reporter $2.50 per year. 



and under royalty lease more than 7,500 acres 
of the most valuable land in the Sunset dis- 
trict, and reaping their reward for years of 
struggle against adverse circumstances. It 
would have been impossible for these gentle- 
men to accomplish what they did but for the 
fact that they were well-to-do business men. 

JEWETT & BLODGET. 

Among the prominent oil men of California 
these gentlemen occupy a justly honorable 
position. Although of modest and retiring 
dispositions their unobtrusive success has 
brought them Into a prominence which is en- 
joyed by but few affiliated with the oil indus- 
try. Mr. Jewett, the senior member of the 
firm, came to California in 1859, and to Kern 
county a year later, and while he Is a pioneer 
in the oil Industry, he is also one of the early 
settlers. Upon his taking up his residence in 
California, after driving across the plains with 
a team of oxen, he engaged in the sheep-rais- 
ing business and at one time owned 20,000 
sheep— the largest owner in the state. In 
1874 he launched the Kern County Bank, the 
only institution of Its kind between Stockton 
and Los Angeles, and it continued to thrive 
from its inception until now it is one of the 
strongest financial institutions in the state. 
Since that time Mr. Jewett has devoted his 
time to farming interests and the bank. Mr. 




H. A. BLODGET. 



A history of the operations of Jewett & 
Blodget is a history of the beginning of the 
Sunset field, and that beginning was all there 
was to tell as late as the spring of 1900. Since 
that time development has progressed by leaps 
and bounds until now the vast expanse of 
rolling hills stretching out to the northwest for 
a distance of fifteen miles from the scene of 
the early discoveries is dotted with derricks of 
flowing wells and drilling rigs, proclaiming 
the enterprise which is making Sunset one of 
the greatest oil districts in the state. 

The first locators of oil claims In the Sunset 
district were the grantees of the old Sunset 
Oil company of Tulare, who In 1890 leased 
their claims to Charles Barnard, who, later, 
assigned a half interest In them to Jewett & 
Blodget. About the same time they secured 
480 acres more by purchase. Their first de- 
velopment was In 1890, when Charles Bar- 
nard went Into the field and set up a rig on 
section 21, the first standard rig In the Sunset 
district. Barnard brought his rig from McKit- 
trick, where It was formerly used by the Col- 
umbian Oil company. He drilled about 1,300 
feet and abandoned the hole. He then drilled 
a well on section 13 and later started another 
well on the same section, striking a heavy, 
black oil and a little deeper a water well. 
With this experience he got a pair of " cold 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



feet " and sold out his entire holdings to Jew- 
ett & Blodget. They secured the services of 
Mr. W. E. lYoule to superintend operations 
and he finished the well on section 13 and 
Started another, but not liking the location, 
quit operations. In the meantime a rig on 
section 21 had put down several shallow holes 
on a little ridge and also dug five or six shafts, 
curbing them up with old railway ties. These 
wells produeed from 15 to 30 barrels each of 
12° gravity oil daily. They were after lighter 
oil but found that there was profit in the 
manufacture of asphalt and it was here they 
located the old asphaltum refinery, operating 
with numerous small open kettles, digging it 
up from the beds and fluxing it with tbe 
lighter oil from their wells. The product was 
hauled by team to Bakersfield and from there 
shipped to eastern cities at a good profit. All 
transportation to and from the field at that 
time had to be done by team, there being no 
railway up to about 1900. The " Sunset 
Stage " will be remembered by all who were 
in any way connected with the early days of 
Sunset. The old refinery finally burned down 
and was rebuilt. Later a modern refinery was 



getting away from the outcroppings and drill- 
ing deeper the quantiny and quality of oil was 
much better, and later companies coming into 
the field profited by their experience. Then 
came the Occidental, Wilson, Obispo, Sedalia, 
Fulton and other companies too numerous to 
mention. 

The field was being rapidly developed to 
the northwest, now Iknown as the Midway 
district, which is, in reality, an extension of 
the Sunset field. Among the foremost com- 
panies to locate there was the Midway of Ore- 
gon, Chanslor & Canfield, H. C. Stratton, Al- 
toona-Minway, Hill & Barlow, and others. 
All got good wells and secured large tracts of 
property which are yet undeveloped. 

Then it became evident that a railway to 
Sunset was necessary to continue the devel- 
opment of the oil field on a paying scale. 
Therefore Messrs. Jewett & Blodget, Mr. Beal, 
officers of the Western Minerals company, and 
others prominent in the industry, set out to 
interest the A. T. & S. F. Ry. in building the 
road, with the result that Mr. Ripley, presi- 
dent of the company made arrangements with 
Mr. Huntington for the building of the road, 



city of 300 gallons daily and was worked on a 
paying scale for some time. The oil was 
taken from open cuts and pits, It is said that 
at a depth of about thirty feet oil was obtained 
having a gravity of 21° or 22 B. The project 
was later abandoned owing to the lack of 
transportation faci'lties and the price of oil 
products going down. In 1887, J. S. Hamilton 
and others drilled a well at McKittrlck in 
which the oil rose to the top of the casing. 
Then Blodget & Well of Bakersfield drilled a 
shallow well in which they got a good show- 
ing of oil. Later the Buena Vista Petroleum 
company erected a small still, refining the oil 
in kettles, but the adventure was a failure. 
In 1893 a railroad was built to McKittrlck 
from Bakersfield, and a larger refinery was 
built, having a capacity of 150 or 200 barrels 
a day. A large deposit of asphaltum had 
been discovered some two miles from McKit- 
trlck, which was worked with profit for seve- 
ral years, the company practically suspending 
operations in 1899. In 1898 Milton McWhor- 
ter erected a small refinery at McKittrlck, 
where he manufactured paint and axle grease 
from the crude petroleum. In 1899 McWhor- 





Old Sunset Stage. 



constructed, having a capacity of three hun- 
dred barrels daily. 

In 1893 Jewett & Blodget sunk three wells 
on section 28, varying from 700 to 900 feet in 
depth. They got a light oil but found water 
in the same stratum and had to pump too 
much water in proportion to oil to make the 
proposition a profitable one. They went back 
to section 13 and sunk three more shafts of 
large dimensions, thinking to get a large pro- 
duction and to also serve as reservoirs for the 
oil. Mr. Youle was sent east to sell the as- 
phalt but was soon called back, as it was found 
they could not supply the demand, their wells 
failing to yield the amount of oil anticipated. 
A contract was then given Hardison & Son to 
drill five wells, all of which proved to be fair 
producers. On their completion Mr. Youle 
again took up the work and drilled twelve 
more Iwells in the same locality, they, too, 
being good producers. About this time the 
Monarch, Areola Consolidated, Pittsburg, 
Acme, Barrett, Lion, Navajo, Sunset King, 
Sunset Czar, Sunset Queen, Western Mine- 
rals and other companies came into existence 
and in almost every case brought in flowing 
wells. Jewett & Blodget had found that by 



which was completed the following year. 
This gave a stimulus to the industry and hun- 
dreds of wells were drilled, which were in 
most cases producers. 

The early development of this field was 
greatly retarded on account of a lack of water 
supply, as all water used in the field had to 
be drawn by team for a distance of seven 
miles. Fortunately, however, in 1900, Jewett 
& Blodget while drilling for oil, struck a good 
water well that has a capacity of 5,000 barrels 
per day and supplies water for the entire Sun- 
set field, they having installed a pumping sta- 
tion and laid the necessary pipe lines. 

MCKITTRICK. 

The first development for oil in what is now 
known as McKittrlck was in the low hills 
which arise from the low land to the north of 
the McKittrlck railway station. These lands 
were located under the mining laws and pat- 
ented by Garibaldi, Jo Querallo and associates, 
the patents including the asphalutm beds now 
located at McKittrlck. In the year 1886 the 
Buena Vista Petroleum company built a small 
refinery about three miles north of where 
McKittrlck now stands. The still had a capa- 



ter, Berry, Keller, Spencer and others leased 
a portion of the property of the Buena Vista 
Petroleum company. They formed the El 
Dorado Oil company and drilled several wells 
but were unsuccessful. Later on Berry and 
Keller leased a strip of land in section 12 and 
now have two fine wells and are drilling two 
more. Other companies were quick to form, 
and in 1901-02 a large amount of development 
work was done and numerous good producers 
brought in, running from 50 to 300 barrels per 
well, and 1903 will probably see a goodly 
number of wells completed, there being about 
twenty -five now drilling. Some of the wells 
in this district have spouted 1,600 barrels of 
oil per day and there are a dozen wells at the 
present time that will do better than 200 bar- 
rels daily. The oil is about 16 B. 

One passing through this oil district at the 
present time cannot fail to note the air 
of activity that prevails, and the evidence of 
vast expenditures in development can be seen 
on every side. The transportation problem 
which has checked the advancement of the 
Sunset-Midway field seems to have been 
solved, and the hundred or more oil wells 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



which have been lying idle from this cause 
alone are now being put in shape for pump- 
ing in anticipation of both a pipe line and 
railway extension, on which work will be 
commenced within the next few weeks, in 
fact a part of the pipe has already been 
received. The pipe line will be owned and 
controlled by the enterprising firm of Jewett 
& Blodget and these gentlemen assure the 
writer that no time will be lost in getting the 
line into working condition. It will extend 
from Sunset northwest, but just where the 
terminus will be is unknown. Jewett & 
Blodget state it will be extended just as far as 
there is oil enough to warrant it. According 
to this the terminus will be either at the Mid- 
way property or that of the Chanslor & Can- 
field on section 8, 3223. The lin£ will be laid 
on the top of the ground so as to get the bene- 
fit of the heat of the sun which shines nearly 
all the year round In this locality. The 



and Southern Pacific railways, a large major- 
ity of our steamships, and most of the power 
plants for every Industry in the state are using 
oil for fnel. Our oil exports are on a steady 
Increase, the Eastern production is falling off 
and it remains for the great oil fields of Cali- 
fornia, with their unlimited store of oil, to 
supply the demand. In i860 the average 
price of crude oil in Pennsylvania was $9 60 
per barrel. In 1861 it was 49 cents per bar- 
rel. The causes which caused this great drop 
were exactly the same which produced the 
drop in the price in California. That is, the 
large production of the product, the con- 
sumption and transportation of which had 
been arranged for. But in 1862 the average 
price in Pennsylvania had advanced to $1.05 
per barrel; in 1863 to $3.15 per barrel; In 1864 
to $9 87 again. I anticipate a like result in 
California. I believe that we have passed the 
low point, that prices will continue to im- 



recovered. Taking the average thickness of 
sands in the Sunset-Mldway-McKittrick field 
as shown by nearly all the wells sunk, it 
would exceed 300 feet. No one will be sur- 
prised at these figures who have carefully 
Investigated the oil industry in other fields. 
Mr. Prentis, of New York, an old and very 
large operator in the Pennsylvania field, said 
there was a single well which he drilled In 
the 6o's and sold to the Standard, which had 
been a constant producer ever since and has 
paid over $1,500,000 in cash to its owners. 
He stated that this was, by no means, the 
record well, as be knew of one well in Penn- 
sylvania that had actually produced for its 
owners to date more than $3,000,000 in cash. 



A Trip Th rough the Field. 

I arrived at McKlttrick one day last month 
and set out on my journey through the fields 
on which I bad been engaged to make a 




photo by C A. Nelson, Bakersfield, 



Jewett & Blodget Refinery, Sunset. 



extension of the A. T. & S. F. Ry. from Sun- 
set north is said to be a certainty and already 
nearly $4,000,000 of the bonds of the proposed 
electric road from Bakersfield to tidewater has 
been sold. This will pass through the Sunset 
oil field and will give a rate of 10 cents per 
barrel on oil from Sunset to tidewater, a dis- 
tance of 100 miles, and the rate from there to 
San Francisco is 5 cents, making a rate of 
15 cents from Sunset to San Francisco against 
the present rate of 43 cents, and great enthu- 
siasm Is shown by all Interested in the oil 
industry at its outcome. Certain it is that 
Sunset will soon have every facility for trans- 
portation and this fact is giving an impetus to 
the industry far beyond the dreams of the 
most credulous. Those who are willing to do 
so are having no trouble in contracting their 
output for three or five years at 30 cents per 
barrel, and wheu you contrast this with the 
stagnation of a year ago you commence to 
realize the advance of the industry on a solid 
basis. Nearly every engine of the Santa Fe 



prove, and that by the close of 1904 oil that a 
year ago went begging for 10 cents per barrel 
will find a ready market at from 50 cents to 
75 cents per barrel at the wells. Taking into 
consideration every element of value, I am of 
the opinion that at no time since the discovery 
of oil in California has the outlook in the 
industry been so promising and hopeful. 
People well posted In the trade begin to talk 
of thoroughly proven oil property as worth 
$20,000 to $30,000 per acre, while a dis- 
tinguished Russian expert, who recently 
visited California for the purpose of obtaining 
information for his government, stated that he 
regarded the proven Kern county lands as 
worth $50,000 per acre. This need surprise 
no one, for it would scarcely be 10 cents per 
barrel for the oil recoverable from the ground. 
Dr. C. T. Deane, Secretary of the California 
Petroleum Miners' Association in a recent 
article states that in every acre of ground 
where the oil sand is 300 feet in thickness, 
there are 500,000 barrels of oil which can be 



report. McKittrick is reached by a branch 
line of the Southern Pacific railway from 
Bakersfield. The railway was built, I believe, 
in 1892 in the commencement of the oil excite- 
ment as noted in the early history of the field. 
The most pretentious building in the town is 
the railway station, which would be a credit 
to a much larger village. The Herron com- 
pany and the National Supply company have 
have branch houses at this point and a hotel, 
store, livery stable and a half dozen saloons 
go to make up the remainder of the business 
section; residences being in the minority. 
The population is In the oil camps nearby. I 
drove through the field to the northwest fol- 
lowing the trend of the oil zone until I 
reached the property of the San Francisco- 
McKittrick Oil company, where, through the 
kindness of Mr. Maxfield, secretary of the 
company, I made my headquarters and was 
occupied some little time in looking over the 
surrounding properties. 

The San Francisco- McKlttrick company is 



PACIFIC OILJREPORTER 



one of the best in the McKlttrick district. 
Their property is located in the Ej^ of section 
14, 30-21, near the northwestern part of the 
proven territory. They have four producing 
wells and No. 5 is in the sand ready for per- 
foration, and the indications are that it will be 
the best well on the property. No. 1 well is 
producing better than 200 barrels daily and 
two, three and four are doing nearly as well. 
The pumps were running night and day, run- 
ning the oil into a large storage tank on the 
property and from there to the Southern 
Pacific tanks at Olig station. Two more wells 
will be drilled on this property at once and as 
their land is now thoroughly proven they 
cannot miss the oil. Oil from these wells 
show 16 Baume gravity. Both Mr. Maxfield 
and Mr. Jackson, the field superintendent, 
were at the property and seemed to take 
pleasure in showing me the detail of the 
work, of which they are justly proud. There 
was an .air of cleanliness about the property 



No. 1 was flowing into an earthen reservoir. 
This well was throwing out a great deal of 
sand and I was informed that it was a good 
producer. It was giving out sufficient gas to 
fire a boiler. Two new derricks were being 
erected and safe it is to say they cannot miss 
oil on any part of thair property. 

At the northwest of the San Francisco- 
McKittrlck, on section 14, the Southern 
Pacific, Bellmont and Alta companies had 
four wells which had never been pumped. 

Clara Foltz, the well known San Francisco 
attorney, had a well on section 14 but it is 
claimed that the contractors left it in bad 
shape when completed and at the present 
time is considered an uncertainty, as these is 
a great deal of water in it. 

Next east of the Berry & Keller property 
is the Kern River, Giant, Southern Pacific, 
Reward and Associated wells on section r3; 
thirty-two good producers in all. Some of 
these have been phenomenal wells. No. 1 of 



choked up with sand and an attempt was 
made to clean it out with the result that it 
again spouted forth throwing the tools and 
part of the casing out of the well and flowing 
beyond control. 

On section 20 there are twenty-three wells 
owned by the Southern Pacific, Associated 
and Twenty Oil companies. 

DABNEY OIL COMPANY. 

I arrived at the camp of the Dabney Oil 
company at about noon the next day and 
here found what I considered, one of the very 
best properties in the McKlttrick field. This 
company has sixteen producing wells and 
the seventeenth has been drilled through an 
oil sand which will be shot with practically a 
certainty of bringing in another good one. 
The rig for No. 18 well is up just back of the 
Miley cabin, which is considered in the proven 
oil belt, out of the water belt, and the com- 
pany expects at least a 400-barrel well here. 
Their No. 8 well is producing 400 barrels 




Photo by C. A. Nelson, Bakersficld. 



The Dabney Property, McKlttrick. 



not always noticeable at such camps; in other 
words, there were no piles of old junk, 
broken down machinery and the like scat- 
tered around, which, in Itself, is a good evi- 
dence of wise management. 

The directors of the company are: Thomas 
B. Bishop, president; Claus Kroeger, vice- 
president; H. U. Maxfield, secretary and 
treasurer; A. N. Lewis and A. V. Lisenby. 

The company is capitalized for 50,000 shares 
par value $10. Being a close corporation 
there Is very little stock on the market at any 
price, the last sold on the stock exchange 
bringing $2.75 per share. From the con- 
servative management and the fact of their 
owning 150 acres of patented land, should 
bring this property to the front as one of the 
most valuable in the state. 

Adjoining the San Franclsco-McKlttrlck on 
the east, on section 13, Berry & Keller have 
two fine wells. No. 1 was on the pump and 



the Kern River has flowed 300 barrels daily 
for three years and no signs of letting up. 
Giant No. 9 is spouting 200 barrels daily at 
the present time. A number of the others 
were gassing and spouting oil and sand. It is 
estimated that section 13 is producing in the 
vicinity of 3,000 barrels dally. 

On section 24 the Pacific Crude Oil com- 
pany has two wells. 

On section 18, 30-22, the McKittrlck Oil 
company has six good wells which are being 
pumped. 

On section 19 the Silver Bow company has 
four good wells. 

On the southeast quarter of section 19 the 
Shamrock Oil company has seven fine wells 
which are part flowing and part pumping 
into the Associated tanks at OHg station. 

One of the Shamrock wells started off at 
1,600 barrels, spouting over the top of the 
derrick. Some months later it became 



dally, and although three of their other wells 
(which were the old El Dorado prospect wells) 
are not pumped, the capacity of the Dabney 
is close onto 1,200 barrels per day with a 
possibility of greatly increasing this output 
and as soon as the wells can be put in better 
shape. The oil from this property shows an 
average of i8^° Baume gravity, and readily 
sells for iY 2 cents more per barrel than the 
present price paid by the Standard Oil com- 
pany for other oil in the field. They have 
sold 22,000 barrels to the American Sugar 
Beet company at this figure and could have 
readily contracted 36,000 barrels per annum 
for five years at a better figure to the same 
concern, but anticipating au early rise in the 
price of oil did not consider it policy to do so. 
The company owns and controls no acres of 
the. most desirable land in the McKlttrick dis- 
trict; also 160 acres in the Midway. They 
own their own water wells, which furnish an 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



■mple supply of water for all purposes; have 
a private pipe line to the loading racks at 
McKittrick and another to the Standard tanks, 
and the Standard Oil company is anxious to 
buy every gallon the company can furnish 
At the present time they are making every 
effort to Increase their output. By connect- 
tlng their hydraulic pump with some of the 
wells they find the capacity of their wells is 
nearly doubled and they figure on thus con- 
necting all the wells at cnce. One string ol 
tools will be kept running steadily, and by 
January ist It Is expected the capacity will 
have been Increased to nearly 2,000 barrels 
per day. 

The buildings of the company are heated 
and lighted by natural gas from their wells. 
Xo other of the large companies in the vicin- 
ity is so well provided with all the needful 
appliances. The company have availed them- 
selves of the many improvements made in 
drilling apparatus during the past few years, 



force. When the price of oil went down, this 
alone enabled them to continue on a paying 
basis. W. D. Roberts, the manager of the 
company, went to the field to personally 
superintend the work and A. H. Butler, Jr. 
handled the work In the home office without 
salary or assistance, and with better times 
coming the company la in a most flourishing 
and prosperous condition. At the present 
time the Oabney are paying dividends at the 
rate of 15 per cent per annum, with the out- 
look good for 25 per cent or 30 per cent by 
the first of the year. 

The stockholders are to be congratulated 
on the success and able management of this 
company. 

OTHER COMPANIES. 

Southeast of the Dabney property about 
two miles are several wells in which some oil 
has been struck. In section 27 the Medina 
Oil company has one well. In section 34 the 
Belgian Oil company has two wells, the Mon- 



Ing out to the south as far as the eye c^ 
see. This, my companian informed me, was 
the Midway district, with Sunset In the dis- 
tance, an expanse of over twelve miles in 
length and from one to two miles In width, 
where there are over two hundred producing 
J wells, a large part of them flowing. At the 
east Is Lake Buena Vista, the sportsman's 
paradise of Kern county. 

MIDWAY OIL COMTANY. 

I arrived at the property of the Midway Oil 
company, of Oregon, late in the afternoon, 
where the hospitality of Mr. Berge, their sup- 
erintendent, was gracefully extended me. 

This is one of the strongest companies In 
the field and their extensive development 
work and comfortable quarters stands as evi- 
dence of the success they have attained. 

The officers of the company are Charles E. 
Ladd, of Ladd & Tilton, bankers, Portland, 
Or., president; W. F. Burrell, capitalist of 
Portland, Or., vice-president; W. M. Wbld- 




I'hoto by C. A. Nelson, Bakersfield 



Well No. 3 of the Midway Oil Company, of Oregon. 



whereby wells can now be sunk more easily, 
quickly and cheaply than ever before and on 
account of which the risk of getting tools 
stuck Is very much less than formerly. The 
oil in the company's tract is reached in a 
deposit of sand which is 150 to 250 feet below 
the surface and which varies in thickness 
from 300 to more than 500 feet. The machin- 
ery at their power plant never stops and day. 
and night the pumps are bringing up steadily 
streams of oil. The larger production is all 
sold in its crude state, but they contemplate 
the erection of a refinery which will result in 
a large increase of profit. 

The directors of the Dabney company are: 
A. H. Butler, New York, who is president of 
the company; E. J. Miley, San Francisco; Dr. 
Chas. H. Earle, Los Angeles; Ira Taylor, New 
York and Thos. F Gilbane, New York. 

One notable feature of the management of 
the Dabney company is economy in office 



arch Oil company one and the Associated two. 
These wells seem to be the eastern terminus 
of the McKittrick district, all wells put down 
between here and township 32 N. range 23 
W., having been dusters, the intervening strip 
being some eight miles In width and Is sup- 
posed to be the synclinal basin between the 
McKittrick and Midway anticlines. 

At the north and west of the McKittrick 
district lies the Tremblor and Devil's Den oil 
districts, supposed to be an extension of the 
McKittrick field. Considerable interest has 
been attracted to this part of the field of late 
and some development work done with good 
results. It is somewhat remote from trans- 
partation facilities, so that development work 
is necessarily slow. 

MIDWAY DISTRICT 

Driving southeast from McKittrick, I soon 
came in sight of a long line of derricks stretch- 



den, |of Portland, Or., secretary and H. C. 
Stratton, of San Francisco, manager. 

The land holdings of the company consist 
of 2,240 acres of what is considered as good 
land as there is in the field. A large part of 
the land Is thoroughly proven, the company 
and its lessees having already drilled several 
wells, and other companies operating on land 
adjacent to that owned by this company have 
proved a considerable portion of their land, so 
that the holdings of the Midway company lie 
directly in the heart of the proven belt. 

Well No. 2 is now 1470 feet deep and has 
passed through several oil stratas. Failing to 
reach a deeper sand it will be perforated and 
will develop into a fine well. Numbet 3 well 
was completed at 1300 feet and is one of the 
best wells in the Midway district. It has a 
capacity of at least 300 barrels daily. Well 
No. 4 was completed as a water well, resulting 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



In a large revenue to the company, as it fur- 
nishes ample water supply for all purposes to 
both the company and its lessees. At the 
present time 16,000 sheep are being watered 
at the well that heretofore had to be driven to 
lake Buena Vista, eight miles distant, and is s 
source of great convenience to the owners. A 
complete water system has been laid from the 
well to all the oil wells and drilling rigs as 
well as to the bunk houses, cook houses, barn, 
etc. The camp of the company is complete 
in every detail, consisting of the superinten- 
dent's office and living rooms, bunk house, 
cook house, blacksmith shop, tool house and 
barn. With the laying of pipe lines to this 
property considerable development work will 
be done, as every effort will be made by the 
company to increase their output. 

ORIENTAL Oil, COMPANY 

The Oriental Oil company of South Dakota, 
holds under leaes 200 acres of the choicest 
land owned by the Midway Oil company of 
Oregon (also 10,000 acres of land in San 
Benito county). Forty wells are to be drilled 



company has a bright outlook for a prosper- 
ous future. 

Sixty acres has been leased to Leslie B. Mc- 
Murtry upon which he is to drill twelve wells. 
Arrangements are now being made to com- 
mence the work, and drilling will be com- 
menced within a few weeks. 

MITCHELL CRUDE OIL COMRANY. 

The Mitchell Crude Oil company holds a 
lease of forty acres of the Midway property. 
Their first well is down 1206 feet. The com- 
pany is in financial difficulties at present but 
arrangements are being made to either com- 
plete the well and carry out the provisions of 
the lease, or the Midway Oil company will 
take the property back and complete the well 
themselves. 

Oil from various parts of the Midway prop- 
erty varies greatly in quality ; for instance, 
in Midway No. 3 the oil is about 12 B ; in 
Oriental No. 1 about 17 B., the other wells 
producing oil of a gravity ranging between 
these extremes. 



and secure patents rather than to develop 
the greatest number of wells, there being no 
outlet for the product, but with the assurance 
of a pipe line to their property they are plac- 
ing a number of rigs at work and will be 
running a half dozen strings of tools in the 
near future. The main camp of the company 
is located on section 8 and is a veritable oasis 
in the desert. Possessing an abundant water 
supply trees and shrubbery were planted 
about the camp, which is nearly hid in the 
luxuriant foliage. This is one of the most 
picturesque and prosperous appearing camps 
I saw In the field. 

Following southeast from the Midway and 
Chanslor & Canfield properties one is con- 
stantly in sight of flowing and pumping wells 
and many drilling rigs all the distance to Sun- 
set. There are very few large land holdings 
outside the Jewett & Blodget properties, most 
of the companies considering twenty to a hun- 
dred and sixty acres sufficient. In a proven 
district the requirements of a lease are such 
that only a company of unlimited resources 



mm 
lit 



<snn 





W^^0^ju^ 



Photo by C. A. Nelson, Bakefisfield 



Well No. 1 of the Oriental Oil Company, of South Dakota. 



on the land leased from the Midway company. 
Well No. 1 has already been completed at a 
depth of 1206 feet, although the casing has 
not been perforated, the oil stands within 150 
feet of the surface and is considered one of the 
best wells in the district. Casing and material 
is being assembled on the ground for several 
more wells and work Is to be pushed until the 
forty wells are completed. It is the intention 
of the compauy to drill at least twenty wells 
within the coming year. 

The officers of the company are L. B. Mc- 
Murtry, president, and G. W. McConnell, as- 
sessor of San Benito county, secretary. 

President McMurtry is now in New York 
city, but will be on the ground next month to 
assume charge of the work in person and will 
remain until the wells are drilled. This is an 
energetic company and has started in in the 
right way, having first made financial arrange- 
ments to carry on the work and will not lose 
as much time as so many companies have done 
who have not first provided the funds to carry 
on the work. Considering this fact and that 
their lands is directly in the proven belt, the 



CHANSLOR & CANFIELD. 

At the northwest, west and south of the 
Midway Oil company is located the property 
of Chanslor & Canfield, gentlemen too well 
known in the oil industry to require any 
especial mention. Their property consists of 
over 3,000 acres of thoroughly proven land 
located In sections 6, 7, 8, 17-21 and 29 town- 
ship 23 north, range 22 west, on which they 
have developed ten fine oil wells ranging 
from 100 to 500 barrels daily cap?city. Real- 
izing early the necessity of a good water sup- 
ply these gentlemen laid a pipe line a distance 
of eighteen miles to springs in the hills which 
has furnished them an abundant supply at 
all times. Since then they have struck a 
good water well, which was the first well on 
section 6. No. 2 well on section 6 was better 
than a 100-barrel well. Four wells put down 
on section 8 were all good producers ranging 
from 100 to 400 barrels each. Two wells on 
section 17 have a capacity of 200 barrels each. 
Three wells on section 21 are better than 100- 
barrel wells. It has been the purpose of 
these gentlemen to prove up their territory 



could handle a larger amount of land. For 
instance you lease twenty acres. Your first 
well must be commenced within sixty days 
and your next two within thirty days from 
the completion of the first and so on until a 
certain number of wells had been completed, 
which, in most cases would be twenty wells 
on twenty acres. Larger acreage would 
require a correspondingly larger number of 
wells. 

On section 15, 32-23 the Casa Oil company 
has a fair well. 

On section 22, 32-23 the Bay City Oil com- 
pany, the Mountain Boy, and the Burke Oil 
company each have a 100-barrel well and the 
Producers Oil company a fair one. 

On section 23, 32-23 the Utah Midway and 
the Producers Oil companies each put down a 
well and got a fair showing of oil. 

On section 26, 32-23 the Mount Diablo Oil 
and Development company got three fair wells 
and the Mascot Oil company got four fine 
ones, one of them being better than a 300-bar- 
rel well and the others nearly as good. They 
own 160 acres of strictly proven territory and 



PACIFIC OIL RBPORTBR 



are one of the strongest companies in the 
field. They produce a 30 Baume gravity oil 
and their property will soon be connected 
with pipe line. 

On section 25, 32-23 is located four of the 
best wells in the entire district, partially so 
from their large capacity but more particu- 
larly so from the high quality of oil produced, 
it being 22 to 24 Baume gravity — the best in 
the field. The Altoona-Midway was a 
gusher, spouting for several months, finally 
settling down to a 300-barrel pumper. 

The following is an analysis of oil from well 
No. 1 on the property of the Altoona Midway 
Oil company: 

Ingredients. Percentages. 

Coal oil 20 

Benzine 5 

Gasoline 2 

Signal oil 7 

Stove distillate 10 

Light machine oil 12 

Engine oil 13 

Lubricants 3 

Coke 2 



over the top of the derrick and the gas roared 
forth for over four months beyond all control 
and drilling operations had to be suspended. 
At the present time the flow is sufficient to 
fire a boiler and the indications are that this 
well will develop into one of the best in the 
district. 

On section 3r, 32-24 the Areola Oil com- 
pany have one well drilling at 1,700 feet with 
good indications and the Lucky Boy has one 
fair well. 

On section 32, 32-24 is located the famous 
Stratton well, which is one of the phenomenal 
wells of the district. 

The Stratton property embraces forty acres 
of proven land in the Sunset-Midway district 
and may be described as the SWJ^ of the 
SWX of section 32, township 32 south, 
range 24 east, M. D. B. M. and is 
probably one of the best known properties in 
the district and has an interesting history con- 
nected with it, and it was after many delays 
and discouragements that oil was struck here 
early in the year 1901. 



the well. The well has flowed steadily from 
that day to this, it having never been cleaned 
out and thousands of barrels of oil has run to 
their reservoirs, there being no transportation 
facilities. The owners are now completing 
the well and it is their Intention to drill sev- 
eral more wells upon this property at once. 
It lies very favorably to the Sunset pipe line 
which passes within 200 or 300 feet of their 
well. As soon as the pipe line is completed 
the owners Intend to build a large reservoir 
and will eontract the sale of the oil or will sell 
the property. 

On section 27, 12-24 the Nanticoke company 
has one good well. 

On section 28, 12-24 the Operators Oil com- 
pany have a 100-barrel producer and the same 
company haa a good well on section 33, 12-24. 

On section 34, 12-24 the California Fortune 
Oil company has eighty acres of proven land 
and three flowing wells. This Is a strong 
company and the pipe line and railway exten- 
sion which is being laid to their door will put 
them in a position to market their product 




Wells of Arco'.a Consolidated, Sunset. 



Asphaltum 18 

Waste 8 

Total 100 

The Sunset Coast also has a 300-barrel 
pumper The Croesus Oil company's well is 
equally as good, while the New Richmond 
company's well was, In some respect the most 
remarkable well In the field. Messrs. Even- 
ger & Smith of Fresno, who were drilling the 
well encountered considerable gas almost from 
the start and at a depth of r,200 feet a pocket 
of gas was struck which blew the ponderous 
drilling tools, weighing over six tons, out 



A contract was let for drilling the well to a 
depth of 1,200 feet and the contractors drilled 
1,204 feet without striking the oil and they 
shut down work and wrote to the owners 
stating that, in their opinion, oil would never 
be encountered here and advised the hole to 
be abandoned. The well was full of water 
and the tools were left in the well. On the 
next day representatives of the company 
visited the well with the contractors, and, 
greatly to their surprise, they found oil spout- 
ing over the top of the derrick, having broken 
loose and thrown the water and tools out of 



which is large and will soon place them 
among the wealthy companies of the state. 
On the same section the Beaver Oil company 
has three flowing wells; the Golden West Oil 
company has one flowing well; the Acme Oil 
company has two flowing wells; the Patuxent 
Oil company has one flowing well and Jewett 
& Blodgett has one flowing well. 

It is hard to say just what the capacity of 
these wells is, as they have all been capped 
awaiting transportation facilities, but it is 
believed that they will be proven better than 
300-barrel wells. The companies did nothing 



io 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



more in development work than to prove up 
their property, but all are now making 
preparations for numerous drilling rigs which 
will be started up at once. 

On section 35, 12-24, there are eight flowing 
wells; two owned by the Federal Crude Oil 
company, two by the Pacific Oil company 
and four by the Jewett-Blodget-Beal Oil com- 
pany. All are considered better than 300- 
barrel wells and the property is considered 
among the best in the district. A cut of one 
of the Jewett-Blodget-Beal wells is illus- 
trated elsewhere in this edition. 

On section 2, 11-24 there are about thirty 
fine producers, most of them flowing. This is 
one of the most thoroughly proven sections in 
the Sunset field and yet there is room for over 
600 more wells, allowing one to the acre. It 
has been said that this section alone could be 
made to produce over 150,000 barrels of oil 
daily. So far there has not been a duster on 
section 2. Among the foremost companies 
operating here is the Areola Consolidated, 
with seven producers and one well drilling; 
the Obispo Oil company, two flowing wells; 
the Monarch, two flowing and two drilling 
wells; the Occidental with three fine pro- 
ducers; the Superior, three good ones; the 
Federal Crude and Barrett, each with a 300- 
barrel well; the United Crude a 25o-b«rrel 
pumper; the El Roy, Dirlgo and Copper Con- 
solidated with each a good well. 

OBISPO Oil, COMPANY. 

The Obispo Oil company, of California, 
although it has been in existence less than 
two years, is now recognized as one of the 
successful companies of the Sunset district. 
When the company was first organized it was 
the intention of the corporation to develop 
certain lands in San Luis Obispo county, 
upon which they had the option for a lease. 
After a careful investigation of these lands, 
by the president, John F. Giles, it was decided 
that the company could not afford to expend 
the immense sum required to develop what 
seemed to be uncertain territory. This pro- 
ject was therefore abandoned and a big block 
of stock which would have been paid for this 
lease was saved to the treasury of the com- 
pany. 

When it was decided not to develop this 
property, Mr. Giles with characteristic energy, 
at once secured a lease on property in the 
famous 2, 1 1-24 section of the Sunset district 
and also purchased a large acreage in the 
Fresno-San Benito district. The develop- 
ment of the Sunset property was at once com- 
menced, and after a great deal of trouble and 
many discouraging delays, a well, admitted to 
be the peer of any in the district was com- 
pleted. This well has an estimated capacity 
of 500 barrels per day and by actual measure- 
ment has flowed between the casing, 100 bar- 
rels of oil in twenty-four hours. Oil was first 
reached at the 400-foot level, but the drilling 
was continued to a depth of about 600 feet, 
the drill passing through an immense body of 
oil sand. The gas pressure was so strong 
thas great difficulty was experienced in com- 
pleting the well. Immediately upon com- 
pletion of No. 1, work "was commenced upon 
well No. 2. This well was speedily finished 
and is fully equal to No. 1. Neither well has 
been opened up, that is the casings have not 
yet been perforated. The continual flow be- 
tween the casings has resulted in the accumu- 
lation of a vast amount of oil, probably not 
less than 50,000 barrels. This is contained in 
an immense reservoir, as shown in the accom- 
panying illustration. 

The Obispo not only has two of the best 



wells in the district completed and paid for, 
but owns beside, three complete drilling rigs, 
office, dwelling house, machine shop com- 
pletely fitted, engine house and all the thou- 
sand and one tools, machinery, engines, 
boilers, pumps, etc., that are needed to equip 
a company for successful and economic drill- 
ing of wells. The stockholders are to be con- 
gratulated on the fact that this is all paid for, 
as the Obispo has no indebtedness. 

The only thing which has prevented the 
Obispo from long ago paying handsome divi- 
dends has been lack of transportation. How- 
ever, the difficulty has been solved and Obispo 
oil will soon be flowing through the pipe line 
and dividends will commence flowing to the 
pockets of the faithful stockholders. We 
understand it is the intention of the company 
to commence sinking additional wells within 
the near future. Under the able manage- 
ment of Messrs. Giles & Alderson we predict 



ARCOLA CONSOLIDATED. 

One of the strongest companies in the Sun- 
set field at the present time is the Areola Con- 
solidated, which is operating on section 2, n- 
24. This is strictly a Massachusetts company, 
Dr. Chas. L. Swan, Staughton being president 
and Mr. Chas. M. Thayer and Wilkins of the 
well-known firm of Thayer & Wilkins, secre- 
tary. They have at present seven fine pro- 
ducing wells which have a dally capacity of 
1,500 barrels aud they could easily double 
this capacity at short notice. They also have 
one rig drilling. They own seven complete 
Standard rigs and will continue to drill until 
at least ten more wells have been completed. 
Like other companies in the field work has 
baen retarded the past year owing to lack of 
transportation, but with the assurance of the 
pipe line and railway work is being resumed 
and the company will soon be one of the most 
active in the field] Mr. L. H. Bartlett, a well- 




photobyc.A.Neison.Bakersfieid. Property of Obispo Oil Company. 



a most successful future for this company. 

In section 3, n-24 the Medina Oil company 
has two good wells, and the Hanford-Sanger 
two good ones. The Teek Oil company, a 
new management, which recently acquired 
the property belonging to the Messrs. Clark, 
Bryan and Wilson, is cleaning out their No. 1 
well and installing a new rig for well No. 2. 
No. 1 well is a good producer and the prop- 
perty is considered proven. This company is 
composed of some of the leading oil men in 
the state and among them is Mr. McKay, who 
was the discoverer of the Pinal well in the 
Santa Maria field. 

On section 12, n-24 Is located the Tiger Oil 
company with one good well, the Sunset 
Center with two flowing wells, the Golden 
West with a fair well, Jewett & Blodget with 
a good one and the Lion Oil company with 
two fine producers. All of these wells are 
being cleaned out ready for the pipe line to 
transport the production. 



known California oil operator is the general 
manager of the Areola Consolidated which 
assures a conservative management of the 
company. They ate at present prepared to 
deliver a full 1,500 barrels of oil daily. They 
own over 1.500 acres of land in the Sunset 
and Midway field. 

FULTON OIL COMPANY. 

The Fu ton Oil company is at present one 
oi the most active in the field. A few days 
ago while going down through a hard shale in 
which they intended to land the drive pipe, 
in well No. 4, the drill sank through and 
penetrated a rich stratum ot oil sand which 
proved to be 262 feet thick, which, with the 
twenty-nine feet passed through previously, 
makes a total of more than 290 feet of oil 
sand. This is a deeper sand than had pre- 
viously been penetrated in the field and 
proves the Fulton property worth many times 



Continued on page Fourteen 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER i, 



A TRIP 

TO THE EAST 

Is delightful, most ways, always, but the 
way always most delightful 
is the way 

BY NEW ORLEANS 

costs no more than other ways 

No Frost SUNSET ROUTE No Snow 

Sunshine and balmy air 

The famous Coast Line 

Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, El Paso, San Antonio, Orange Groves, Cattle Ranges, Old 

Missions, Quaint Mexican Life, Little Picaninnies, Sugar and 

Cotton Plantations of Louisiana 



Comfort SUNSET LIMITED Enjoyment 

Vestibuled Pullman Sleepers. Observation Car. Compartment Car. Dining Car. 

Meals a la Carte Oil-burning Engines—no cinders. 

San Francisco to New Orleans every day, 6:00 p. m. 



Personally Conducted Touriet Sleepers 

THROUGH WITHOUT CHANGE 

— TO — 
CHICAGO ST. LOUIS CINCINNATI WASHINGTON CITY 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

WOULD YOU INVEST IN OIL 

FOLLOW THE LEAD OF THOSE WHO ARE SUCCESSFUL 



Where fortunes have been made in oil, they have almost without exception been made out of the rise in values of land. This 
is particularly true in the California oil fields. 

There are as many opportunities for acquiring land for speculation today as ever before. I can speak authoritatively on the 
subject, having an intimate knowledge of land values and local conditions in the various fields. 

I have made money for myself 

I have made money for others 

I can make money for you 

I have yet to record my first loss or failure In oil. Every tract of land and every 
proposition with which I have been connected, either as agent or principal, has been suc- 
cessful. I was the first operator to meet with suocess in the West Side Extension of the 
Coalinga field, and from my success there a score of men have been made rich. I have 
holdings there that cost me a mere trifle that today require six figures to express their 
market value. It was not luck that did it. Only an expert knowledge acquired by actual 
experience can accomplish such results. 

I offer no land to my clients that I would not invest my own money in on the same 
conditions. Everything that I offer has my personal endorsement, and everything that I 
offer will bear expert examination. 

My offerings in the Western Kern and Coalinga fields are the very cream of those 
districts. 

Owners having first-class lands, within the proven belt, are solicited to list them with 
me. My facilities for selling land are unequalled. 

I want lands in Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo counties. What have you there ? 




NEW MAP OF COALINGA. 

I have just compiled a map of the Coalinga field. Accurate and up-to-date. The 
finest map of the field ever published. Sent by mall, prepaid, on receipt of one dollar. 

U. M. THOMAS, 

318 Pine Street, 

San Francisco. 

Reference : Any person with whom I have ever had dealings. 



d/7 &> 



Oeafrfr ° ;/<:o - 



£}/*?>0 0>i 



/m/?s a 1 ' i 




14 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



Continued from page Ten. 



as much as was formerly supposed. Well No. 
i has since been carried down in the same 
way as No. 4 with the same result and No. 3 
is being deepened. Their No. 5 is drilling at 
560 feet and No. 6 at 310 feet. Their No. 2 
will be re-drilled. Realizing the necessity of 
immense storage capacity they have nearly 
completed two 110,090-barrel reservoirs the 
first of which is now ready for the oil and 
the second will be ready by the time No. 1 is 
filled. The company have ample buildings 
for the requirements of their force of men. 
Recently arrangements have been made for 
the sale of 5,000 shares of the treasury stock 
at $5.00 per share and no difficulty will be 
experienced in disposing of the remaining 
5,000 shares at the same price. With these 
sales the property will be in a condition to 
take care of itself financially and we predict a 
brilliant future for the company. 

The officers are: John M. Wright, president; 
Jacob H. Neff, vice-president; Gurden Brad- 
ley, secretary. All are too prominent in Cali- 
fornia oil development to require further 
mention. 



which was a gusher, starting off at 250 bar- 
rels, and settling down to a sixty-barrel 
pumper. E. Jessee of London, England, is 
president, Percy Andrews, Salisbury, Eng- 
land, secretary, and L. Aubert is general 
manager in this country. The Alameda is 
one of the successful companies in the Sun- 
set field. 

Other companies operating on section 13 
are the Sunset, Diamond, St. Paul, Queen and 
Crown. 

Southeast of here some two miles, several 
fair wells were developed by the Navajo, 
Sunset, Standard, Western Minerals, and 
Anna L. companies, but the oil was of an in- 
ferior quality and there has been little de- 
velopment in this direction. 

The Jewett & Blodget refinery is refining 
about 300 barrels dally at the present time 
and will soon be enlarged so as to take care of 
a much larger amount. A great deal of oil is 
also shipped in the crude state by rail from 
Sunset. 

Sunset is a typical oil town with its supply 
houses, saloons and post office. Jewett & 
Blodget have a picturesque little camp near 



and carry a complete line of casinglspears, 
slip sockets, combination sockets, swedges, 
underreamers, jacks, etc. They handle the 
racket jack, which is coming into general use 
for pulling casing. Their pipe machine 
handles casing from 55^-inch to n^-lnch and 
drive pipe from 4-inch to 12-inch. 

Oil men find it to their advantage to have 
all the shoes screwed into the first joint of 
casing by means of this machine as they can 
be put on so much better than can be doae 
the old way in the derrick by the use of chain 
tongs. 

The installation of this plant at Sunset is 
little short of a god-send to the companies 
operating there. For years and previous to 
the building of the railway all repair work 
had to be hauled by team to Bakersfield, a 
distance of over forty miles. After the build- 
ing of the railway the trouble of carting, load- 
ing and unloading was equal to the trip and 
the cost of shipping nearly equal to that of 
new tools. 

Mr. A. J. Webster, the proprietor and gen- 
eral manager of- the company is a man of 
many years experience in this class of work 
and his genial disposition and business abil- 
ity are sure to win him success. 




Photo by C. A. Nelson, Bakersfield 



Webster Iron Works, Sunset. 



The Maricopa Oil company also has two 
fine wells on section 1, 11-24; the Pittsburg 
Oil company got a good show and the Kern 
Sunset Oil and Development company a fair 
well. 

Oh section 7,11-23 one fair well was de- 
veloped by the American Girl Oil company, 
and is the only producing well on the section. 
Other wells have been put down on the sec- 
tion, but it is believed did not go deep enough. 

On section 18,11-23 the Sedalia and Cali- 
fornia has seven fine wells; these wells when 
brought in were all gushers and after supply- 
ing a large amount of oil for several years are 
still flowing steadily. 

Jewett & Blodget are the principal owners 
of the Sedalia and California stock. The oil 
is being sold to the California Consolidated 
Oil company, Jewett & Blodget also being the 
heavy stockholders of this company, and it 
may here be said that the majority of the 
companies operating in the Sunset have 
leased their land from Jewett & Blodget 
under royalty lease. Another company oper- 
ating on section 13 is the Alameda Oil com- 
pany. This company holds twenty acres of 
proven land and has several wells, one of 



the refinery. 

There is no boom on at Sunset and there 
won't be if those interested can help it. 
Everything is progressing on a solid business 
like basis. There is a tendency to secure 
larger land holdings where possible and 
prices are high and constantly advancing. 
A rapid, prosperous and legitimate develop- 
ment of the field is expected. 

Webste r Iron Works. 

A great incentive to increased development 
in the Sunset field is the installation of a 
machine-shop at Sunset by the Webster Iron 
Works. This company have a large shop at 
Bakersfield and a few months ago seeing the 
great need of a general repair shop at Sunset 
installed a plant there. This shop, which 
is pictured above is fitted up with pipe 
machine, lathes, forges, steam hammer, and in 
fact every conceivable machine and tool used 
in this class of work. Operators find it greatly 
to their advantage to have bits dressed at the 
shop where it can be done much more satis- 
faction and at less cost than at the rigs. This 
company is also an agency for the celebrated 
Bishop Fishing Tool company's fishing tools 



What Advertising Is. 

In a recent lecture a prominent Los Angeles 
business man said: 

"My definition of advertising is 'information 
happily brought to the attention of persons 
most likely to be influenced.' We are a na- 
tion of advertisers, and this city has the spirit 
of advertising imbued in it from Its position. 
The reason why Los Angeles is the best adver- 
tised city in the world is because Its advertis- 
ing is backed here by enthusiasm. Josh 
Billings says that the reason he likes a rooster 
is because he has a crow and then because he 
has spurs to back the crow with. Enthusiasm 
is the spur that the advertiser must have to 
back his advertising. Another point, that 
counts is that of individuality. The adver- 
tiser can do wonders with a strong personal- 
ity at the head of his business, and the subtle 
influence that such a character has on a busi- 
ness is what may be called 'Indirect advertis- 
ing.' 

"Practical hints as to how to advertise your 
industries are hard to give. Advertising 
planned to sell a breakfast food won't sell 
machinery. The most that I can hope to do 
is to give you a better understanding, per- 
haps, of what advertising is and what it ought 
to accomplish." 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



15 










16 



PACIFIC OIL, REPORTER. 



THE LATEST OIL NEWS. 



Recent Developments Which Have Made Oil One of the 
Greatest Industries In the Far West. 



Colusa. 

Rapid progress is being made in the 
new Chehalis well and it is now 350 
feet in the ground. 

W. E. Youle visited the well near the 
Mountain House and thinks very favor- 
ably of it. A report comes down that 
the well is good for eight barrels in 24 
hours. The general opinion is that the 
Williams Company has a good thing in 
sight. The oil is high grade. 

Kern- 
On the Grossmayer holdings the rig 
for No. S is completed. 

The Vesta has completed its well, 
No. 8, which is one of the best wells on 
the lease. 

The Junction Oil Company has just 
completed a new well on its property 
in the Rem river field. It is said to 
be a 200-barrel producer. 

The Potomac is having trouble with a 
set of tools which were lost in well No. 
30 on its property. The drillers are now 
fishing for their recovery. 

The Nevada County has completed its 
well, No. 14. The company will not drill 
any more new wells at present, as there 
is some work to be done on wells here- 
tofore completed. 

The extension of the road for a dis- 
tance of about three miles into the heart 
of the Sunset oil fields was strongly ad- 
vocated some four months ago by prom- 
inent San Francisco oil men. 

The new map of the Kern River dis- 
trict is the latest and most accurate yet 
prepared and will be gieatly in demand 
by those who are interested in the coun- 
try's great industry. 

The Sterling promises soon to be- 
come one of the dividend paying com- 
panies. Few offerings of Sterling stock 
are now reported and these are quickly 
taken at prices close up to the $3 mark. 

Local people who invested in Fulton 
stock are feeling very jubilant over the 
present prospects of that company. Ful- 
ton stock has been steadily advanceing 
and is now quoted at $3.90, with no 
offerings. 

The Lackawanna is down 600 feet 
with its well No. I, and has the water 
shut off. This company is installing a 
battery of four eightly horse power boil- 
ers, to furnish steam for operations on 
the lease. 

The Standard continues to purchase 
teams for the construction of its big 
reservoirs. Evidently the hugh corpora- 
tion has faith in the future of the Kern 
river field and intends to be prepared to 
store its product. 

The work of starting the Southwestern 
refinery is being delayed by the in- 
ability te get the necessary coopers' 
supplies promptly. The over-worked 
condition of the manufactories is respon- 
sible for the delay. 

As showing the amount of oil which 
the Southern Pacific is using, it may be 
stated that on Friday last 54,317 gallons 
of oil were run into the engine tanks. 
This means nearly 1,300 barrels of oil, 
and when it is recalled that Kern is but 
one of many tank stations, some idea 
may be formed as to the use of the new 
fuel. 

In a communication of recent date, 
addressed to the editor of this paper, 
the A., T. & S. F. Ry. officially announce 
that within less than thirty days the 
Santa Fe extension of the Sunset Rail- 



road to Superior will be completed. It 
is announced definitely that not later 
than November 1 the dirt will begin to 
move along the line of the extension. 

The demand for maps of the several 
fields of Kern county is increasing all 
the time and is now in excess of what it 
has been for a long time owing to the 
great revival of interest in the oil indus- 
try. Messrs. Barlow & Hill have also 
prepared maps of the Sunset, Midway 
and McKittrick fields, which are now 
being printed and will soon be ready for 
use. 

Parties who claim to be informed say 
that Chanslor & Canfield will not put 
their Midway property into the Asso- 
ciated, as has been currently reported. 
The property in question includes a 
large body of proven oil land and the 
truth or falsity of the report is a matter 



cally all are being operated. The idle 
ones are almost without exception on the 
outer edge of the field which have been 
virtually abandoned. Of the wells 
working in the field a86 belong to the 
Associated, including a large part of the 
best properties. 

There is a feeling in the air that the 
price of oil is soon to take a general 
shift upward. Coalinga oil has already 
advanced, it is reported, a fact due no 
doubt to a desire to stimulate the pro- 
duction of the lighter gravity oil. 

The rapid rise of Eastern oil has also 
undoubtedly assisted in a sympathetic 
way in the stiffening of local prices. It 
is predicted by many well informed 
men that the production of Eastern oil 
will eventually fail to such an extent 
that California will be shipping illumi- 
nating oil East. 

Work has been commenced by the 
Santa Fe Railroad on the extension of 
its line into the West Side oil fields. 
The surveys were all completed some 
weeks ago and a force of men have just 
commenced the work of construction 
which will be completed in a short time. 
The distance to be covered is two and 
a half miles and this will bring the 



resumption of work gives some founda- 
tion for the report that the difficulty be- 
tween the two companies has been satis- 
factorily adjusted. The suit, however, 
has not yet been formally dismissed and 
is still on the calendar of the Superior 
Court. Some time ago the attorney for 
the Shamrock people stated that the 
matter would be fought to the end with- 
out any compromise. 

John F. McVean this morning filed a 
suit against H. L. Dort to recover judg- 
ment for $2,000 which he claims to have 
advanced the defendent during the 
months of June and July 1902, to cover 
the cost of a site for a refinery at the 
Kern River oil field. Both parties to 
the suit are well-known oil men of this 
city. Mr. McVean was at the time 
named, together with one Clark, form- 
erly of this city, engaged in promoting 
the organization of the corporation 
known as the Clark Refining company, 
and while residing in Cleveland, Ohio, 
employed the defendant as his agent to 
purchase a site for the refinery. He 
claims to have advanced the sum of 
f3,ooo, but believes that only $r,ooo was' 
used in the purchase and wants an ac- 
counting. — Californian. 

The increase in school attendance is 



Photo by c. a, N«uson. BakeraBeid Property of Chanslor & Canfield, Midway. 



cf much moment to the Associated 
and incidentally to all interested in the 
district. 

(ju.ui: Li;... - ago th» Mon?rch and Mar- 
icopa properties were acquncv. u., 
Adolph Spreckles and Crocker Wool- 
worth bank. These parties took up the 
question of extension with the Santa Fe 
Company and by their negotiations 
stirred the officials to action within a 
very short time. Now that better trans- 
portation facilities are in sight, business 
is picking up very rapidly in the Sunset 
field. — Californian. 

An evidence of the rapid growth of 
the Kern River field is found in the 
large attendance at the Aztec district 
school, which includes the entire field. 
There are now iao pupils enrolled and 
two teachers. Bonds hare been issued 
for a new school house, as the present 
building will not accommodate the num- 
ber of children and a third teacher will 
be employed as soon as the accommoda- 
tions are sufficiently enlarged. 

The firm of Barlow & Hill has just 
completed a new up-to-date map of the 
Kern River field, which shows a total of 
746 wells completed and forty-nine rigs 
rUkJj 1 nr , of the we! Is com plated praeti 



railroad into the very heart of the Sun- 
set district, placing it on a nearer plane 
of equality with Kern river by enabling 
most of the principal producers to ship 
direct f-^m +heh Drooerty by rail. Th 
transportation iiiu».„.. ' — ' ■"' 
largest factor in keeping the We' 
in the backward condition. 

The Grand Oil compan- a ^a^arted t 
be making good pro ..^j ra :'.s j>-c 
perty on the west s»'* ; ( where d oling it 
going on. The*»ellis t: e. g^-d dejjit 
and every ir'lii-ati.a cf oil in paying 
quantities is being found. Manager 
Pennin 5 ton says there is no doubt that 
the oil is there and it is only a question 
of time and work before it is obtained. 
The well is away from the proven belt, 
but the formation is the same as that at 
Sunset and the management is prepared 
to go to great depth if necessary. It 
has the largest rig and the heaviest ma- 
chinery in the county. 

The Associated has recommenced op- 
erations on the Shamrock property at 
McKittrick which were suspended when 
the litigation in the Superior Court in- 
stituted by the Shamrock stockholders 
began. The famous gusher is again be- 
ing worked and yjeldine; heavily. Tb- 



taken as an indication not enly cf the 
growth of the field but also of the con 
fidence felt by oil men in its permanent 
character. As long as there was any 
Tar that the work might be oaly tern 
c-y mfi!" rusTied rr.en Ves : V ed 

'- — • : *"' a - w'+ v :hem. 

"h^ ^ley are aoing ou , J ^.. to the 

eei;ii & ' certainty of constant employ- 
'•t'; 'i . - large proportion of single 
iisi. tinjtJ Irillers and laborers will of 
course have i'*e effect of keeping the 
scfcoci popu'.au. i from increasing in 
proportion to the kttw'hof the whole. 
In this connection it may be also noted 
that the establishment of a school in the 
Midway district this yea.' may be taken 
as indicating a similar condition in the 
west side fields. 

Frank Braden, general manager for 
Bergheim & McGarvey of Galicia, Aus- 
tralia is looking over the Kern county 
oil fields. The company which Mr. 
Braden represents, is the largest oil con. 
cern in Austria, occupying in that coun- 
try a position in its control of the oil in- 
dustry similar to that of the Standard in 
the United States. He comes here for 
the purpose of investigating the methods 
of drilling and working the oil wel's -*' 
Colifo-ru!'., "7'hi!e '1 '•hi »'.'v AIj, 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Braden if being ihown over the Kern 
River field by Manager Bowcn of the R. 
H. Hcrron company's local office. He 
fpent Mine dajf in Los Angeles before 
coining here and looked over the field 
there. The information gathered as to 
American methods will be nsed in im- 
proving those in vogue abroad wherever 
possible. 

The Santa Fe is reported to be hav- 
ing trouble in obtaining rights of way 
several properties for its cxten- 
through the Sunset field. The 
right of way agent of the company was 
in Bakcrsfield, Thursday, in consulta- 
tion with a number of operators in- 
terested in the companies which arc re- 
ported to be opposed to granting the 
railroad the privilege asked for on the 
terms which it desires. Most of the 
companies in the field are said to have 
granted the right of way without objec- 
tion, being very glad to get the line 
t<> cross their properties. Two, how- 
ever, arc reported to have interposed 
obstacles and it is on account of this 
that the right of way agent is now in the 
city. Meanwhile the company is mak- 
ing all preparations to go ahead with 
the road where the right of way is al- 



17 



0000 shares of the combine's stock, 
which constitute the company's pro 
rata. 

The Associated, the producer, the 
Standard, the marketer. That in the 
opinion of some well informed oil men is 
what the present situation at Kern River 
field points to. The Associated now 
controls a very large proportion of the 
production of the field, and when all its 
development work is completed this will 
be greatly increased. The Standard, 
with its great pipe line, its control of the 
markets of the world and facilities for 
transporting oil, is undoubtedly in a 
position to dictate to all. The fact that 
the Southern Pacific is now maintaining 
such close relations with the Associated, 
even looking to a complete control of 
combine through the deal which, ac- 
cording to contract should be closed to- 
day, is not expected to in any way in- 
terfere with the operations of the Stand- 
ard. The big corporation never enters 
a field without first having a complete 
understanding with the railroad com- 
panies. And that such an understand- 
ing now exists in this field is becoming 
more evident every dap. For two or 
three months past the complaints of the 
v.rious independent operators that they 



pipe line, which is being laid now. The 
tank at Graciosa is being put together 
as fast as possible. 

The oil to be stored in this tank for 
shipment by steamer is 120,000 barrels 
bought recently by the Pacific Coast 
Oil Company from the Pinal Oil Com- 
pany. 

The California Coast Company's well 
on the Drum place is progressing very 
satisfactorily. The drillers are making 
good headway, having thus far not met 
with any serious reverses, which often 
is the luck of even the best of oil men. 

Grading has commenced at Port Har- 
ford for the 35,000-barrel tank to be 
erected by the Pacific Coast Oil Com- 
pany (the Standard) and the tank will 
probably be completed within thirty 
days. Wm. Sandercock commenced the 
grading last Monday. 

Drilling on No. 2 of the Brookshijre 
began Thursday, and Manager Goodwin 
states that the derrick and outfit is one 
of the best that has yet been brought 
into the field. The water supply is ob- 
tained from well No. I. Work will be 
pushed as fast as possible. — Santa Maria 
Times. 

Another possible use for the property 








Photo by C. A. Nelson, Bakcrsfield 



Group of Wells In McKittrick. 



ready adjusted and to complete the 
grading at the earliest possible mo- 
ment. 

Between 3,000,000 and 4,000,000 shares 
of the stock of the Associated Oil com- 
pany, held by the Reed Crude and the 
San Joaquin Oil companies, passed into 
the hands of the Southern Pacific com- 
pany yesterday. The transaction took 
place In this city. The Southern Pacific 
company paid cash for the stock, which 
comprises the entire holdings of both 
the Reed Crude Oil and the San Joaquin 
Oil companies. Out of the purchase 
price paid the Reed Crude Oil receives 
$1,560,000 and the San Joaquin Oil com- 
pany $840,000. The intention of the 
Southern Pacific company to absorb the 
stock holdings of the Associated Oil 
company is now apparent. Besides the 
Reed Crude Oil and the San Joaquin, 
two of the most important of the allied 
interests of the Associated Oil company, 
the Southern Pacific has also acquired 
the stock of the Bear Flag company. 
It is now reported that the Kern Oil 
company has decided to distribute its 
stock in the Associated Oil company 
among its individual stockholders, who 
will then be in a position to do as they 
please with it Today Secretary Bender 
of the Kern Oil company received the 
securities from the Associated for 2,000,- 



are unable to obtain cars to ship their 
product have been becoming louder and 
louder. All this time no complaint has 
been heard from the combine. Under 
these circumstances it will be an easy 
matter for Mr. Rockefeller and Mr. 
Harriman to absolutely dictate the situa- 
tions. Just what will be the effect of 
such a condition is a question upon 
which there may be some difference of 
opinion. But most of the well informed 
oil men do not express fear as to the 
outcome. The Standard with its un- 
limited facilities can demand any price 
it desires in the markets of the world. 
It can therefore also pay any price it 
deems advisable to encourage or dis- 
courage production. That it will en- 
deavor to encourage rather than discour- 
age producers is expected in view of the 
enormous demand for oil now existing 
and daily increasing. Some oil men are 
even talking of oil at $1 and $1.50 a bar- 
rel at some time in the future. Should 
this come to pass it is conceded by all 
that it will not be only with the consent 
but with the aid of the Standard.— Cali- 
fornian. 

Santa Barbara. 

Work on the Union Company's well 
No. 2 is progressing steadily. No. I is 
capped awaiting the completion of the 



is suggested by the fact that the Stand- 
ard Oil people expect to build a plant 
for manufacturing acid. This is a very 
high explosive and it may be that the 
acid plant will be erected there in order 
that it be removed as far as possible 
from the refinery. 

The Elliott Company, after several 
months of persistent labor in trying to 
sink a well with a rotary drill on the 
Wm. Rice place in Cat Canyon, it has 
been decided to give up the project, as 
it is too difficult to get down with this 
method of drilling. Accordingly Mr. 
Elliott, the projector, has decided to put 
in a standard rig, which will be put up 
as soon as it arrives. 

Peinal Company's well No. 4 struck the 
oil sands Wedsenday at a depth of 1900 
feet, encountering a fine grade of oil, 
which burns almost like the refined pro- 
duct. This well is considerably deeper 
than any of the three preceding wells, 
and show's that the oil sands are in- 
clined to dip towards the Brookshire 
property. The new well will be deep- 
ened until a strong flow is developed. 
No. 1 is still being deepened. No. 2 is 
under the pump and No. 3 is flowing. 

Western Union well No. 17 is down 
1900 feet now and things are looking 
very good. Well No. 12, which partly 



collapsed, is again in shape and yield- 
ing a good supply of high grade oil 
Mr. Wm. Logan has assumed charge of 
the drillers and the work on the three 
new wells in contemplation will be 
pushed as rapidly as possible. The com- 
pany is shipping large quantities of oil 
to the Orient, via the pipe line and Al- 
catraz, where it is loaded on steamers. 




Sedalia and California Gusher. 



One hundred acres of land, being the 
southwest corner of the Emerick ranch 
and situated about one mile southeast of 
Giant, changed ownership yesterday, and 
there is considerable speculation among 
the people hereabout concerning the 
identity of the purchaser and the pur- 
poses for which the land is to be used. 

The property in question lies on either 
side of the Sandard Oil Company's pipe 
line, and those who had a hand in mak- 
ing the deal believe the above company 
are the purchaser with the idea of de- 
veloping a water supply sufficient to ac- 
commodate the refinery at this place. 

The matter of securing an adequate 
water supply has become a matter of 
considerable anxiety to the refinery peo- 
ple and it is thought the land was se- 
cured for either present needs or to be 
improved at some time in the very near 
future. 

The Lompoc Oil Developing Company 
has not succeeded in clearing their well 
as yet, but Mr. Steele, the contractor, 
said Tuesday last that he had no doubts 
but that he would soon remove the ob- 
structions to further progress. He fur- 
ther said, that he had not a single doubt 
but that oil would be secured before 
going down many feet farther. Of 
course there is always a doubt until the 
real thing is encountered, but the gas 
flow indicates the near approach of the 
oil strata. This company has encoun- 
tered grevious trouble in prosecuting its 
work. Two wells have been abandoned 
after getting down some fifteen hundred 
feet, and the third, down twenty-five 
hundred, is obstructed with the drop- 
ping of the drill. Should the company 
fail of securing oil at even three thou- 
sand feet, it would only prove that they 
may have encountered a fold which of- 
ten occurs in the best oil sections. This 
company owns something over one thou- 
sand acres in the heart of what is be- 
lieved to be a great oil belt, and al- 
though it has expended in development 
work, machinery and land, nearly forty 
thousand dollers, the stockholders have 
not lost confidence in their holdings, and 
will, if the present well prove a failure, 
put down a fourth well higher up on the 
anticline. — Lompoc Record. 

Sargent's. 

The most satisfactory progress is re- 
ported from the well of the Watsonville 
Oil Company near Sargents. The drill 
has reached a depth of 1165 feet and the 
well, having encountered and pierced 
the second oil sand, is now completed 



i8 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



with the exception of perforating the 

'casing. 

In order that the work of perforating 

;may be ><fone in the most approved man- 
ner tite company has sent to Bakersfield 
for a professional perforator who has 

4he latest patented apparatus for that 
purpose. The proejctors have every 
reason to hope that when this work is 



y& 


% 


» — 


Ql 


HM 


*?Z-Z- 



Altoona-Midway Gusher. 



■completed they will have a well of at 

ileast 150 barrels. 

Cpl. E. J. Beane has an oil rig in read- 
iness for boring on the Westdorf place, 
west of Hoover's on the San Jose road. 
This; well will be started under spme of 
the most favorable indications ever ex- 
perienced in California. The oil sand 
crops at the surface and the numerous 
seepages also indicate that a body of oil 
is near the point of exudation. It is 
conceded by experts that Col. Beane has 
every prospect of a bonanza. — Pajaron- 
ian. 

Ventura. 

E. P. Foster, who is exploiting the 
natural gas field a few miles up the 
Ventura river, reports that the flow of 
gas is steadily on the increase, and the 
tank it took twelve minutes to fill a few 
weeks ago is now filled in less than ten 
minutes. Conditions are the same at the 
wells regarding the wells that empty 
into the test tank, but the increase of 
flow has ben continuous and steady. At 
the time measurements were made by the 
newspaper men it was demonstrated 
that enough gas was in "sight" to an- 
swer the needs of Ventura for fuel pur- 
poses, but the continued increase of the 
flow has raised the hopes of the pro- 
moters to a considerable degree. The 
deep Well which Mr. Foster is sinking is 
still going down. It has been sunk now 
nearly 300 feet and has recently gone 
through another strata of gas. This is 
the third strata thus far passed through. 
The flow on each occasion has been good 
and has encouraged the drillers to go yet 
deeper. Each gas strata is marked as 
passed and all will be taken care of in 
good season and all turned into use foT 
furnishing Ventura, Oxnard and other 
places with natural gas when the plant 
is put in and pipes laid. Natural gas 
for Ventura is now in better prospect 
than ever. — Ventura Free Press. 

Wyoming. 

C. G. Andrews and D. C. Haight, who 
are largely Interested in our oil field, 
have been in Utah the past few days on 
mining business. They were accom- 
panied by their wives. 

C. O. Richardson of the Standard Re- 
serve Oil company was in town on Mon- 
day. He said they had met with a good 
showing of oil at a depth of 200 feet on 
their present drilling site. 

A derrick is being erected on the N W % 
of section 10, 14-118, making the second 
well on that section. The Atlantic & 
Pacific company have plugged their 
well on this section, being satisfied that 
it is a producer. 

On Thursday the American Consoli- 
dated Oil company brought in well No. 
2 on section 23, 15-11-117. It is said to 
be one of the best in the field. The 
company are jubilant over the strike as 
likewise are others. One by one good 



wells are being brought in and the suc- 
cess of our oil fields is now assured. 

The Oil Well Supply company of 
Pittsburg, Pa., has purchased the inter- 
ests of Messrs. Ellis & Nebergall in the 
machine shops department and oil well 
supply store at Spring Valley, and 
through their enterprising representa- 
tive, C. A. Dorn of Salt Lake, will carry 
on an extensive business there. Mr. 
Dorn will shortly remove here to reside 
and will have an office in the Beckwith 
building. He is a business man of good 
judgment and we predict success for 
the company under his management. 

J. H. Lobell, manager of the Belgo- 
American Oil Drilling trust has returned 
from a visit to England and France, 
where he went to report on the progress 
being made by the drilling trust in 
Wyoming, and to unfold new plans hav- 
ing for their object the further develop- 
ment of the oil fields. Mr. Lobell is 
greatly encouraged at the progress be- 
ing made in the Salt Creek, Salt Wells, 
Lander and other fields in which the 
Belgo-American company is now inter- 
ested and is now operating. 

The Silver Monntain Oil and Mining 
company, recently organized by In- 
diana capitalists with $2, 000 000 capital 



200 at 
100 at 
500 at 
loo at 
1,300 at 
200 at 
200 at 
100 at 
100 at 
loo at 
600 at 
100 at 
500 at 
600 at 



1,000 at 
3,000 at 

500 at 



HOME OIL. 

105(830).. 21000 

ios(S3a) 10500 

t 05 52S 00 

1 02 fi 102 50 

1 00 1,300 00 

1 00 (B 30) 20000 

97J£ ■■•• 19500 

97'A (S60) 97 50 

1 10 no 00 

1 "ji (S 30) 112 50 

1 15 69000 

1 15 (S 30) "5 00 

1 17^ 587 50 

1 20 720 °o 

INDEPENDENCE. 



19 (B 60) . 
18 



190 00 
540 00 



LION. 



04 

MONTE CRISTO. 
80 

S2'A 

85 

85(B 3 o) 

OCCIDENTAL OIL. 

i,85oat j8 

OIL CITY PETROLEUM 
100 at 27 , 



300 at 
200 at 
500 at 
500 at 



100 at 
100 at 



28(B 3 o). 
a8 



PEERLESS. 



240 00 
105 00 
425 00 
425 00 



333 00 



27 00 

28 00 
28 00 



40 at 14 00 56000 



Oil Stocks. 



Bid. 



Alma 1.30 

Apollo .42 

Asso. Oil Co Stk. Tr. 

Certificates 20 

Aztec 75 

Bay City 

Bear Flag 

California Standard 

Caribou 90 

Central Point Con 65 

Chicago Crnde 19 

Clalremont it 

Esperanza t.65 

Fauna 01 

Pour 

Fulton 4.00 

Giant , .*.-.... 

Hanford 125.00 

Home .95 

Homestake 

Imperial ■. 

Independence 16 

Junction 18 

Kern 4.75 

Kern River io 

Lion 

Monarch of Arizona . . . .49 

Maricopa 

McKittrick 

Monte Cristo 

Nevada 

Occidental of West Va .17 

Oil City Petroleum 

Peerless 14.00 

Petroleum Center 

Piedmont 

Pittsburg 



Asked. 

1-35 



•35 



.90 
.10 



1. 05 



.69 



•19 

.it) 

5.00 



.04 

.10 

•3o 

.82K 

•45 

•19 

.28 




Photo bv C. A. Nelson, 
Bakersfield 



San Francisco-McKittrick Property ; Berry & Keller In Background 



stock, will send a number of drills and 
drilling machines, a corps of skilled 
workmen, both in the mining and in the 
oil business, and a man to manage the 
equipment into the new oil fields of Utah> 
Wyoming and Colorado. The company 
represents influential men from Indiana- 
polis, Marion, Muncie and a number of 
other Indiana cities While they are 
reticent regarding the value of their 
property, comprising more than 30,000 
acres, it is learned that they hold some 
of the choicest territory in these states. 



California Stock and Oil 
Exchange. 

The following were the stock sales in 
the California Stock and Oil Exchange 
in the formal sessions held for the week 
ending Wednesday, November 4th. 

ALMA. 

600 at 1 35 $81000 

APOLLO. 

600 at 43 25800 

CENTRAL POINT CON. 

100 at 66 66 00 

ESPERANZA. 

100 at 1 50 150 00 

FAUNA. 
t , 000 at oi 5000 



PITTSBURG OIL. 

250at 15 3.750 00 

STERLING. 

100 at 2 80 (B 30) 280 00 

200 at 275 55000 

TWENTY-EIGHT. 
100 at 420 42000 



19,940 Shares Amount $10,672.50 

LONDON PARIS & AMER. LTD. 

5ati55 50 777 50 

NORTH SHORE R. R. CO. 
160 at 600... 96000 

165 Shares Amount, $1,737.50 

The monthly record of sales since 

January 1, 1903, is as follows: 

Shares. 

January 267,019 

February 322,443 

March 199,908 

April 236,268 

May 401,454 

June '54.720 

July 74,594 

\ugust 181,478 

September 146,123 



Value. 

$255,202 
219.358 
151,982 
H5,57i 
154,386 
117,928 
71,890 
"9.231 
74.455 

Stock Quotations. 

Following are the latest quotations for 
stocks of oil companies listed on the Cal- 
ifornia Stock and Oil Exchange : 



Reed Crude 40 

S.F.& McKittrick.... 2.75 

San Joaquin O. &D 

Senator 

Shamrock 

Sovereign 38 

Sterling 2.70 

Superior 04 

Thirty-three 

Toltec 20 

Twenty- eight 3.50 

Union 

United Petroleum 

West Shore 

Western Petroleum 

Wolverine 



•39 
2.90 



The Pacific Oii. Reporter is 
the only oil paper on the coast. 
Subscription $2.50 a year. 



AMERICAN CONSOLIDATED 
Oil Company 



A. B. Butler, J. 

President 



A. Chanslor, 

Vice President 



13,750 shares of stock for sale at 
8 cents per share — par value $1.00 

P. W. SPAULDING 

ATTORN EY-AT-LA W 

Evaneton - Wyoming 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



j s csS MS c ss saasaasa t aagtflss s s sssaaaaas 



NEWS FROM THE FIELD 






Supplied by oar Regular Correspondents 



Coalings Letter. 



Coaumoa, Nov. 3, 1903. 
A very singular thing occurred this week 
with well No. 1 of the Penn-Coalinga Petro- 
leum company. This well has been pumped 



penetrating the oil sand and the well will be 
finished by the end of next week. 

Drilling was begun last Monday on Esper- 
anza No. 4. Well No. 3 is again being cleaned 
out endeavoring to increase Its production to 
to that of the other two wells of the company. 

The Roberts Oil company has put up a 
1,200-barrel tank to serve for storage when 
its well comes in. 

The Union Oil company has erected two 
tanks on section 13, which will shortly be 
connected with a four-inch pipe line to Ora 
station. The course of the pipe line will ex- 
tend from the SE# of section 28, 20-15. 





--|ys3; 



The Stratton Well. 



for nearly one year and has produced from 
fifty to seventy-five barrels per day. During 
this week, after working it a little, it began to 
pump at the rate of over 150 barrels of an 
entirely different oil varying from its former 
production nearly 1 ^ Baume. No. 2 well of 
this company has been thoroughly cleaned 
out and is now flowing a good sized stream 
averaging 150 barrels per day and over. This 
gives the company a considerable output 
after the arduous work to overcome the 
trouble In its No. 1 well. 

Pleasant Valley Farming company are now 



which has been expressly purchased to pro- 
vide a tank site for the company, almost 
straight across to section 13. Whether the 
company will extend branch lines to other 
sections of the field is not known. 

The gang of pipe layers who have been at 
work for the Southern Pacific railroad for the 
past few weeks have about finished laying the 
main line extending from Ora station to sec- 
tion 7. At the present terminus on section 
7 the railroad company will erect a pumping 
plant and a 35,000-barrel tank. From this 
point the field lines will radiate out into the 
field and will then be pumped to the tanks at 
Ora station. 




HARRY W. EVANS, 

Oil Fields Representative of the American Steel and 

Wire Company. 



The land deals In Coallnga are extending 
now beyond the railroad track where several 
recent purchases have been reported in sec- 
tions 4, 10 and 16' Unauthentic rumor is cur- 
rent that a company has been organized to 
begin operations on section 10. Since most 
of that section has been sold and resold very 
lately it would indicate that somebody is con- 
sidering the land of value. Other parties ex- 
perienced in the oil industry in the field have 
also purchased in that neighborhood. 

R. M. D. 



We manufacture the best 

lubricating oils for oil 

drillers 

KING KEYSTONE OIL CO., 

116 Front St., San Erancisco. 



We Want to Purchase 

Superior Stock 
Monarch Stock 
Lion Stock 
STOCK, BOND & INVES. SYNDICATE, 
515 Exchange Bldg., San Francisco. 



FOR SALE 

A complete oil well drilling 
outfit near Huntington, Ore- 
gon. Inventory and price 
on application to 
H. V. GATES, Hillsboro, Oregon. 



OUR 

LARGE DOME BOILERS 



Are the Best 

Ask our Customers 

They don't cost any more than 
the old pattern. 



READING 

Drive=pipe, Casing, Tubing and Line=pipe 

(Iron, and not Steel, \ 
a strong point J 



Large Stock on Hand 



R. H. HERRON&CO. 



Los Angeles Coallnga Bakersfield 
San Francisco McKittrick Sunset 






PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



> oooooooooooooooo< 



An Expert Oil Man's Opinion. 

The Sunset, Midway and McKittrick Fields Not 
Identical.-=By Honorable C. A. Barlow. 



OOOOO©' 

For many years past, oil has been pro- 
duced on the southeast and northwest ends 
of these fields respectively at Sunset and 
McKittrick. Until three years ago the 
development work was confined to these two 
points and only on the out-croppings, or 
where the oil sand was exposed on the sur- 
face. But during the past two years some of 
the most experienced and practical oil men 
have become Interested in this part of the 
Kern county oil fields, and to day the proven 
territory is of such proportions that it bids 
fair to exceed any oil field in the state, not 
excepting Kern River. 

This may seem to be a strong statement, 
but any qualified person will become con- 
vinced of its accuracy if he will take the time 
to study the territory referred to. The next 
few years will convince the most skeptical, 
and in a brief manner I will outline some of 
the more recent development which points to 
the great future for these fields. 

As stated In the beginning of this article, 
oil has been produced for many years at both 
Sunset and McKittrick. During the past two 
years the Sunset field has been extended 
toward the northwest by the discoveries made 
by the Maricopa, Pittsburg, Colorado-Cali- 
fornia. California Fortune, Stratton, and many 
other wells along the same line. This proved 
the territory toward the northwest for a dis- 
tance of four or five miles. These were fol- 
lowed by the discovery of the Bay City well 
in the Midway field. Drilling at this time 
was being carried on along the direct line 
between Sunset and McKittrick, it being con- 
sidered that th<£ oil belt was continuous and 
direct between these two places. But the 
Oregon Midway, Transfer and other com- 
panies ascertained that they were not on the 
line of the oil. The wells were located nearer 
the foothills, toward the southwest, and splen- 
did strikes were made by the Chanslor & Can- 
field, Oregon Midway, Producers' Guarantee, 
Mascot, Burke Oil company, Sunset, Coast, 
and others too numerous to mention, and not 
needed in this article to demonstrate the 
theory advanced. 

All of these strikes were southwest of the 
line between Sunset and McKittrick, and 
were convincing proof-taken in connection 
with the dusters on the direct line, that the 
Sunset-Midway strike was not at all connected 
with the strike at McKittrick. 

The extent of the development northwest 
from Sunset to-day covers a strip of territory 
about fourteen or fifteen miles long, and will 
vary in width from one-quarter to three- 
quarters of a mile. There is no reason to 
believe that it may not be extended to much 
greater width when the drill is carried down 
to greater depths. 

And again, the strike of the "1901" Mon- 
arch and Belgium to the southeast of McKit- 
trick and along the line of hills that parallel 
the Midway strike, and about five miles from 
it, is almost convincing proof of the theory 
that there Is no connection between the Sun- 
set and McKittrick sands. And then the out- 
croppings and plainly marked stratas along 
the line extending southeast from McKittrick 



in a direct line with the strikes made by the 
"1901" Monarch and Belgium which can be 
traced on the surface for twenty miles, leaves 
no room to doubt that this is an extension of 
the McKittrick strike and entirely independ- 
ent from the Sunset-Midway. All along this 
line the outcroppings are easily traceable, and 
In the vicinity of section 11, 32-24 there is one 
Of the largest and most plainly marked out- 
croppings and blowouts in Kern county. 'All 
of the land in this immediate vicinity bids fair 
to yield an abundance of oil, and fortune to 
those who develop the same. 
The Aroostock Crude Oil company is now 




Obispo No. 1, Sunset. 



at work on the southern part of this continu- 
ance of the McKittrick strike, and it has esta- 
blished a model camp there on section 2, 32- 
24 and installed one of the most complete rigs 
in the field. It has the assurance of some of 
the best judges in the field that it is certain 
to get one of the best wells in the county. 
But the only expert that never fails is the 
drill, and it will soon get a report from that 
source. 

The surface indications lead those who have 
examined the territory to believe that the oil 
sand will be a hard sand and the oil of a light 
gravity. The stratas are an extension of the 
McKittrick strata, and the oil sand, when 
penetrated, will probably develop some more 
wells of the character of the Giant and Dab- 
ney properties of McKittrick. Then the 
theory of the two parallel strikes will be 
proven, extending as they do along the west 
side, about five or six miles between them, 
and it will add to the area of proven oil land, 
a belt of country some twenty miles in length, 
and of a width that can only be demonstrated 
by the drill, making the Sunset-Midway in 
connection with the McKittrick Extension, by 
far the largest oil field In the county. 



Report o«lU. IS. Geol ogical Survey. 

Not being a geologist or oil expert, and 
having no desire to pose as such, I have 
copied the following from a report of the De- 
partment of the Interior on the United States 
Geological Survey of the famous Sunset-Mid- 
way-McKitrick oil fields, which will give a 
perfectly reliable description of their forma- 
tion without placing the writer in a false 
position : 

SUNSET FIELD. 
" This district lies in the southwest corner 
of the San Joaquin valley, along the eastern 
base of the San Rafael range, about 35 miles 
in a direct line southwest of Bakersfield, with 
which it is connected by a branch of the A. T, 
& S. F. Ry. It is also distant from the Mc- 
Kittrick about 25 miles, but recent develop- 
ments in the Midway field, the northwestern 
extension of the Sunset, are gradually dimin- 
ishing this gap. The Sunset field, like those 
to the northwest, is developed in the low foot- 
hills of the Coast range. The physical aspect 
of the region is that of moderately rugged 
mountains, 3,000 to 4,000 feet in altitude, bor- 
dered by deserts, The formations involved in 
the geology of the district include in the 
higher portions of the adjacent range, a great 
series of massive gray concretionary sand- 
stone and dark colored shale, probably Tejon ; 
on the slopes, local developments cf gritty 
sands, brown and yellow limestones and gyp- 
slferous clays, perhaps a lower division of the 
Miocene, the upper division consisting of 
siliceous shales, typical of the Monterey ; in 
the lower outer ridges a session of conglomer- 
ate, sandstones and clays many hundred feet 
thick, the equivalent of San Pablo, of Middle 
Neocene age ; in the valley, recent gravels. 
Between the San Pablo and older formation — 
the horizon of most importance from the pe- 
troleum point of view — there exists a marked 
unconformity, the line of union as exposed 
lying now at one horizon now at another, in 
beds both above and below the break In conti- 
nuity. Just within the border of the younger 
formation the development of the oil field has 
taken place, the wells drawing their peteol- 
eum from one or more of the conglamerates 
and sandstones adjacent to the plane of un- 
conformity. 

"Structurally, the strata of the Sunset dis- 
trict, while thrown into an anticline of great 
extent, present in detail a succession of folds, 
those of greatest amplitude lying furtherest 
within the mountain, the general trend of all 
being about N. 50 W. Faults also exist, but 
none of large displacement was detected 
within cr near the oil-producing area itself. 
The greatest crushing has been effected in 
the shales of the Monterey shale, but along 
the desert edge the San Pablo also shows a 
number of minor flexures, from developed 
en echelon, to which is due the frequent off- 
sets to be observed in the trend of the oil belt. 
The general dip of the strata in the oil-yield- 
ing territory is northeast, or towards the val- 
ley. Its direction is, however, modified by 
the flexures referred to, and by other and 
local variations in strike. 

"The wells of the Sunset district attain a 
depth of from 500 to 1,500 feet, and while 
there is a similarity in the oil sand, it is ques- 
tionable whether the same horizon is every- 
where the productive zone, for the San Pablo 
is deposited against the slope of the Miocene, 
from which it might have drawn the petrol- 
eum into several beds abutting it at the plane 
of unconformity. The wells in the Midway 
are somewhat deeper than those in the Sunset 
area proper, having been drilled further out 
on the slope of the anticline. The special in- 
terest of these wells is their position along the 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



21 



exterior of the anticline at a very considerable 
distance 'from both axis and end, and in a 
locality where the strike and dip are appar- 
ently maintained at great regularity. The 
gravity of the oil in the Sunset district varies 
from n° B. in very shallow wells in the south- 
eastern part of the field, to 17 or 18 B. in the 
deeper ones in the southwestern portion. 

MCKITTRICK DISTRICT. 

"This district lies on the edge of the desert 
at the eastern base of the Coast Range, about 
fifty miles west of Bakersfield. The railway 
station is McKittrick. The Coast Range in 
the vicinity embraces a number of parallel 
ridges, the highest constituting the eastern 
border of the Carriso Plain. From this each 
succeeding ridge attains a lower altitude until 



aoo or 300 feet in width extending for eight 
or ten miles along the middle portion of the 
field, has, in a great degree, lost their strati- 
fied nature and became fissile by reason of 
the severe crushing to which they have been 
subjected in the sharp foldings and faulting 
that has here taken place. Along this line of 
faulting the shales are of a chocolate brown, 
from the dried bitumen with which they have 
been Infilterated. 

"The San Pablo, consisting of the conglo- 
merate, sandstones, and clays typical of it, is 
well developed, and the terrane is marked, as 
elsewheie, by a deep deposit of dust where 
ever weatheriug has been carried to an 
extreme. The lowest stratum of the formation 
exposed in the field is sandstone, conglomer- 



and faults exist in line parallel to those, and 
at either end ol the district one or another of 
them may become the chief fissure, yel 
apparently, so far as at present known, with- 
out especial accumulation of petroleum Of 
the overthrust nature of the main fold inter- 
esting evidence exists in the material that is 
brought up by the bailer In drilling — not only 
sands more or less saturated with oil, but 
pebbles characteristic of the San Pablo. Con- 
spicuous among the latter are those of sili- 
ceous shale of the Monterey type varying 
foraminiferal remains, fish scales, and pholas 
borings. A noteworthy feature of the line of 
disturbance for several miles both northwest 
and southeast of McKittrick, also, are the 
dikes of sandstone Impregnated with bitumen. 




Oil Flowing From Well of the Lion Oil Company, Sunset. 



the outermost line of hills is but a general 
elevation above the general valley. The 
developed oil field in the region of McKit- 
trick lies along the interior ridge, separated 
from the outer ridge by a valley one and one- 
half miles wide. The length of this district 
is about twenty-five miles. 

"The formations involved in the occurrence 
of oil are the Monterey, and the San Pablo, 
an unconformity existing between the two. 
The Monterey consists principally of siliceous 
shales, with their chalky, earthy, or more 
argillaceous modifications. Gypsiferous clays, 
limestones and sandstones are but slightly 
developed, except in the northwestern por- 
tion of the field, where certain beds have a 
general aspect of the lower division of the 
Miocene. The siliceous shales within a zone 



atic in layers, the pebbles of which are gran- 
ite, siliceous shale, .quartzite, and occasionally 
a pyritic rock that has been derived, from 
some beed of much earlier age. This sand- 
stone and conglomerate is generally exposed 
in close proximity to the fault referred to 
above and is also stained with bitumen. 

"The structure of the McKittrick is that of 
a sharp anticline, en echelon with adjacent 
anticlines of the range. Along its axis is 
developed the fault mentioned, which locally 
is of the nature of an overthrust, the siliceous 
shale of the Monterey west of the plain being 
pushed up well over the sand, conglomerate, 
and clays of the San Pablo. While this frac- 
ture and fold, along which most of the pro- 
ducing wells of the district are located, are 
the most important of the region, other folds 



These vary in length from a few feet to a 
half mile or more, and in width up to 10 or 15 
feet; their depth, or course, is unknown. 
Gash veins of high-grade asphalt also occur. 

"The productive oil wells of this district for 
its entire length lie within a zone less than a 
quarter of a mile wide, and in places less than 
200 feet wide. Their depth varies from 200 
to 1,500 feet. The shallower hole being in 
the center of the field opposite McKittrick. 
The yield is from a few up to 700 barrels, the 
latter exceptional. In gravity the oil varies 
between ii° and 17 . While the narrow, pro- 
ductive zone is persistent in the general 
directness of its trend— about N. 6o° W. it 
is, nevertheless, somewhat undulating accord- 
ing to the axis of crumbling or faulting 
varies." 



PACIFIC Oil, REPORTER 



Barlow & Hill. 



This firm is one of the pioneers of the 
Kern county oil fields and their tireless 
efforts have been of incalculable in- 
fluence in the development of that field. 
One thing this firm claims and that is 
absolute reliability. In the early his- 
tory of Kern county oil fields when wild- 
cat companies were predominating Bar- 
low & Hill issued a complete set of maps 
which did more to kill wild-catting in 
California than perhaps all other things 
put together. These maps were com- 




Hon. C. A. BARLOW. 



plete in every detail, showing water 
wells and dusters wherever they oc- 
curred and oil wells only when they were 
truly such. There was a wailing on 
every side and numerous companies who 
had been showing derricks and dusters 
as "oil wells" were compelled to go out 
of the business. 

Mr. Barlow is largely interested in the 
Sunset-Midway oil field, being one of 
the principal owners of the Altoona- 
Midway and the Croesus Oil companies 
and also a large amount of individual 
land which all lies within the thoroughly 
proven belt. Mr. Hill is also largely in- 
terested in these oil lands with Mr. Bar- 
low. He is at the present time largely 
interested in mining and is secretary of 
the Peute Gold Mining company. The 
firm still continue to issue maps on the 
various Kern county oil fields, which are 
models of reliability. 

Messrs. Barlow & Hill occupy a justly 
honorable position in Kern county oil 
development. 



UNION 
PACIFIC 

Suggests 

Speed 
and 
Comfort 

S. F. Booth, Gen. Agent. 
1 Montgomery St., 8. F. 

Phone, Exchange 300. 



M. L. Woy. 



M. L. Woy, of Fresno, was among the 
very first to go into the Midway oil field. 
With others he secured nearly 3,000 
acres in the very heart of the field, of 
which 2,240 acres have been leased to 
the Midway Oil company of Portland, 
Oregon. The M idway Oil company has 
prosecuted development work with most 
gratifying results on this large tract. 
Mr. Woy sold to the Producers' Guar- 
anteed Oil company a section of land 
which has a number of fine wells on'.it. 




M. L. WOY. 



He is a heavy stockholder and one of 
the directors of the Producers' company. 
Mr. Woy is also heavily interested in 
the Coalinga field, being one of the or- 
ganizers of the Commercial Petroleum 
company and is at present owner of 
about one-sixth of the stock of that com- 
pany, of which he is a director and 
also treasurer. He is also interested in 
several other enterprises in different 
fields in the state. 



613 Market St., San Francisco. 



4\ 

Santa Fe 

% ¥ 



ALL THE WAY 

CHICAGO 
In 3 Days 



Trains leave Union Ferry Depot, San Fran- 
cisco, as follows: 

7 Aft A. M.— *BAKERSFIRI,D T.OCAI,; Due 
*ti\) Stockton 10:40 a. m., Fresno 3:40 p. m., 
• uv Bakersfield7:i5p. m. Stops at all points 
in San Joaquin Valley. Corresponding 
train arrives 8:55 a. m. 

9jja A. M.— §"THE CALIFORNIA I.IMIT- 
«lll BD i" Due Stockton 12:01 p. m., Fresno 
mvv 3:20 p. m., Bakersfield 6:00 p. m., Kansas 
City 3rd day 2:35 a. m,, Chicago 3rd day 
2:15 p. m. Palace Sleepers and Dining 
Car through to Chicago. No second class 
tickets honored on this train. Corres- 
ponding train arrives °ii:io p. m. 
93A A. M.-*VAIAEY LIMITED; Due 
All Stockton 12:01 p. m., Fresno 3:20 p. m, 
■" v Bakersfield 6:00 p. m. The fastest train 
in the Valley. Carries Composite and 
Reclining Chair Car. No second class 
tickets honored on this train. Corres- 
ponding train arrives 11:10 p. m. 
4.AA P - M._* STOCKTON LOCAI, ; Due 
■III Stockton 7:10 p. m. Corresponding train 
• vv arrives 11:10 a. m. 

!.AA P I M.-*OVERI,AND EXPRESS ; Due 
».UU Stiicfctop 11:15 P. m„ Fresno 3:13 a.m. 
'• vw Bakersfield 7:35 a. m„ Kansas City 4th 
day 7:00 a. m., Chicago 4th day 8:47 p. m. 
Palace and Tourist Sleepers and free Re- 
clining Chair Cars through to Chicago 
Also Palace Sleeper which cuts oot at 
Fresno. Corresponding train arrives 
4:25 p. m. 
Da "y I Mondays and Thursdays 

Tuesdays and Fridays. 
Personally Conducted Parties for Kansas 
City, Chicago and East leave on Overland Express 
Monday, Thursday and Saturday at 8:00 p. m. 
Ticket Offices, 641 Market Street and in Ferry 
Depot, San Francisco ; and 1112 Broadway 
Oakland. * 



J. 8. EWEN 

STOCKBROKER 

318 PINE STREET, Room 5 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAI<. 

Member California Stock and Oil Ex- 
change, and San Francisco and Tonopah 
Mining Fxchange. 

Telephone Main 1552. 



Notice to Creditors. 



Estate of William B. Winn, deceased. 

Notice is hereby given by the under- 
signed, executrix of the estate of William 
B. Winn, deceased, to the creditors of, 
and all persons having claims against, 
the said deceased, to exhibit them, with 
the necessary vouchers, within four 
months after the first publication of this 
notice to the said executrix at the office 
of William H. Waste, attorney-at-law, 
906 Broadway, Oakland, Cal., which said 
office the undersigned selects as her 
place of business in all matters connected 
with the said estate of William B. Winn, 
deceased. 

MARIA ROSA WINN, 
Executrix of the last will and testament 
of Wiliani B. Winn, deceased. 

Dated Oakland, September 28, 1903. 

William H. Waste, attornery for 
estate, Oakland, Cal. 



Wyoming OH Companies 

We can furnish you nice folders 
with the map of Uinta county oi 
fields on one side, and on the 
other whatever advertising matter 
you may desire. 

We have half-tone cuts of the 
field which can be used in the 
folder free of charge. On the 
map your property will be shown 
in colors. 

Price per thousand $40. When 
a large number are desired a sub- 
stantial reduction per thousand 
is made. 

Orders filled promptly, 
Pacific Oii, Reporter, 
318 Pine street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Have You Securities 

that pay no dividends and you want 
some that do? If you want to buy, sell 
or exchange investment stocks, or if you 
want gilt-edge shares in operating com- 
panies, address the Debenture Surety 
Company, Rialto Bldg., San Francisco, 
which also incorporates, finances and 
operates good enterprises. 



Under-Reamers Fop Sale. 

We have for sale one or two each, of 
the different size Plotts Under-reamers 
in first-class condition. It will pay yon 
to get our prices on these tools if you are 
in the market for under-reamers. Also 
we have one each of 5)6 and 7^ Lei- 
decker Under-Reamers for sale. 
THE I/OMA OIL COMPANY, 
401 Conservative Life Building 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



W. A. BBOPHY, 

914 Mutual Savings Bank Bldg- 

708 Market St., San Francisco. 

Telephone, Green 816. 



Petroleum Lands Examined and Re- 
ported on in all Parts of the United 
States. California a Specialty. 



Companies Incorporated 

under the lienient laws of 
ARIZONA 

which has the broadest laws of any state. 
Companies can be organized to do busiuess any- 
where No personal liability. No limit on capi- 
talization. No State examination of books. No 
franchise tax. Stock can be made non-assessable 
and can be issued for services. 

Write for information and blanks to 
HUGH M. CREIGHTON & CO. 
Phoenix, Arizona. 



Stock, Bond and Investment Syndicate 

(Incorporated) 
Money Loaned on Stocks. 

Listed and Unlisted Oil and Mining Stocks 
R. L. CHENEY, Secretary 
514-515 Examiner Building 

San Francisco, California 



THE NATIONAL SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

Oil Well Supplies 
Drilling and 
Fishing Tools 

Fitter Cables-best in tbe world 

We carry In stock heavy 7fHn., 5^-in. and 
4^-in. Boston Casing, in addition to all the 
standard sizes and weights. 6-in., 8-in. and 
10-in. Boston Drive Pipe always on hand. 

Pacific Coast Headquarters 

117 North Main Street 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Branches: 

Bakersfield and McKIttrlck, Cal. 



PACIFIC OIL RBPOKTBft 



33 




Pacific States Mining 
and Investment Co. 



This Company a** beca eatabtiahed eleven 
tear* and has «ceat« broken or own office* 
In the pitndpai dlies of America mid Europe. 

Entire atock laauea taken over (or aale. 
Companies Incorporated under the laws of 
any Slate. Stock Issues underwritten and 
m uaranleed by fold bonds. Reports on .nines 
furnished tn French, German' Spanish or any 
Buropcan language. Special facilities for 
preparing maps for publication In prospect- 
aaea, newspapers, etc. We do our own 
wo-k. 

Money loaned and interest- bearing or divi- 
dend-paring Investments furnished. Strict* 
est confidence observed. Inquiries attended 
to. Bank References. Prospectuses of a 
superior and attractive kind prepared without 
Charge for the literary work to companies 
placing their stock sale* with us. 

Mining, industrial and agricultural pro- 
jects wanted. Prompt attention to all corre- 
spondence. Send for sample copy of the 
"Pacific State* Investor," an up-to-date fi- 
nancial paper, with rapidly Increasing cir- 
culation In the United States, Canada, Mexi- 
co and all parts of Europe. 

Pacific States Mining 
and Investment Co., 

328 Post St., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



MAPS OF THE 

KERN RIVER and COALINGA 

OIL FIELDS 

These maps are just out and 
show all the holdings of these 
fields, wells drilled, wells drilling, 
tanks, pipe lines, names of prop- 
erty holders, etc. They are the 
only correct maps of these fields 
published. For sale in San Fran- 
cisco only by the 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Price, $1.50 each 



PATENT S — Unlted States and 
•^ — Foreign. Trade 

Marks Registered. J. M. NE8 BIT, 

Attorney, 921 
Pittsburg, Pa. 



Park Building, 



KEEP POSTED ABOUT 

U. S. Steel 

Corporation 

The White & Kemble Atlas Map and Volume 
of Statistics should be in the hands of every stock- 
holder. Nowhere else is the same amount of in 
formation accessible to the public. This volume 
shows by a five-color map the location of plants, 
ore lands, railroad and steamship Hoes, and gives 
official statements of earnings, distribution of 
capital, division of securities, incorporation cer- 
tificate, full text of by-laws, complete legal digest 
of mortgages, etc., etc., corrected to October, 1903. 

Price $5 net, to accompany each order, 

FOR SALE ONLx" BY 

DOW, JONES & CO. 

44 Broad 8t., New York. 

The oldest news agency of Wall Street, and 
Publishers of the Wall Street Journal. 



INVESTORS READ THE 

WALL STRBET JOURNAL 



The Pacific Underwriting 
and Trust Company. 

Home office, Parrott Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

If Capital is desired for the pro- 
motion of any legitimate proposi- 
tion, Mining, Manufacturing, Irri- 
gation, Mercantile, Patents or 
Railroads, we can assist you. 

Companies incorporatbd un- 
der any State Laws desired. 

Stocks and Bonds under- 
written. 

Gold Bonds, Interest from two 
to four per cent, for sale. 

Address all communications to 
the Company at its Home Office. 



W. D. I. HOWARD, 1. E, 

Consulting Engineer and 
Expert on Oil Combustion 

Official Inspector of Oil-Burning Instit- 
utions on Steam Vessels ai author- 
ized by the Onited States 
Treasury Department. 

Mills liiliiig, Sai Francisco, Cal. 



A. ZELLERBACH & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

416, 418, 420, 422, 424, 426 

Sansome St., San Francisco 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
incidental to the trade. 

Wt carry the Larfcat stock. Oar prices are 
E^tU table. 

Tel. Mala, 1188. 



5 , *t*'<i*-*t* , *irft'fe#>'*i*'*S*tr«,fe* 1 'iSr»> 



We offer for sale the 
capital stock of the 

Southwestern Oil Refining Co. 



| 12 Per Cent 
| Per Annum 

1 

j 

5w 



It pay» 12 per cent per annum on the price 
asked, and will soon pay larger dividends. 
Wilte for literature, including endorse- 



ments of well-known Eastern capitalists 
who visited California and personally In- 
vestigated before investing. Address 

R. D. ROBINSON CO., Inc. 

Paid-up Capital, $100,000 
355 Broadway. Los Anftelea, Cal. 



The American Fancier 
and Breeder 

Gives the best methods of Breedlngand 
Raising. 35c yer year. 

AMERICAN POULTRY FARM 

Prize-winning strains. 25 years experi- 
ence. Stock and eggs for sale. 

P. M. MUNGER & SONS. 

DeKalb, 111. 



Opportunities in a Lifetime 

ledqiarters Schttl, firenaeit and 

Oil Lands ii California. 

School lands may be taken from 160 to 640 acres. 
Land» abound in all counttea to State. They re- 
quire no condition* as to residence on land or 
cultivation, and carryall minerals and deposits, 
only fi.ij an acre. Kasy terms. Fortunes have 
been made in all the California oil districts. Now 
Is your opportunity. School lands are adapted to 
Farming, Ranching, Timber Lands and are the 
Safest and Cheapest Speculation in the United 
States. Send stamp for Land Book and Circulars. 
Fine proven oil lands to offer. Correspondence 
solicited. Established 1885. 

WISEMAN'S LAND BUREAU 

105 So. Broadway 
Los Angeles, California. 



GOLD! 



Always at Par. 



Hudson Gold Mining Co. 

Owns rich gold properties in Arizona; 
active work now in progress, to continue 
which stock is being sold at 



10 



CENTS Par Vaiuc J 1 - 00 

^ Full Paid, 

CHAPF Absolutely 

c "" ,nu Non-Assessable. 



When present block has been subscribed 
price will be advanced to ao cents per 
share. Send for particulars. Bank ref- 



W. G. Young & Co., Fiscal Agents, 

628-630 Laughlin Building, 

Los Angeles, Cal, 



Paul W. Prutzman 

US New Montgomery St. 



ANALYSIS AND REFINING 
TESTS OF PETROLEUM 
ANALYSIS OF ASPHALT & 
FAT & LUBRICATING OILS 



Tel. Mint 2791 San Francisco 



A. S. COOPER, C. L, M. £. 



219 Crocker Building 

SAN FRANCISCO 



SPHCIALTIBS 

Petroleum Oil, Asphaltum and 
kindred hydrocarbons 



OIL WELL 
Casing 

(BOSTON BRAND) 

Line Pipe 
Steam Pumps 
Valves and Fittings 
Belting 

Qrane co. 

H. T. LALLY, Manager 



23-25 FIRST ST. 
24 FREMONT ST. 



1 



San Francisco, Cal 



CONTRACT 



Drilling deep wells for 

Oil or Water 
Furnish Complete 

Plants Tor Drilling 
Prices Reasonable 




WANTED 



Good Second hand Rigs 
Oil Well Tools 
Oil Well Casing and Pipe 
Engines and Boilers 
Fishing Tools 



PHONE PINE 191. 



\y # E # YOULE i5i Brockhorst St., Oakland, Cal. 



Warehouse: Third Street, between Franklin and Broadway. 



The Star Drilling Machine 



Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame of machin 
or oil and gas works. It is usually advisable to 
ave boiler mounted upon trucks separate. 




Descriptive catalogue ms.ltd 'ree. 



The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of operating for oil or gas. 

Its tests range from shallow water wells to a limit of 2825 feet in depth, but it is especially 
ecommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 1000 feet of casing. 
r 

One No. 4 Machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

made In Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machines made that are absolutely without annoying springs. They are slmp'e, 
powerful aud efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. Used in every State and Territi 
and In many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand Pumps. Spuds etc 

STAB DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

AKRON, OHIO 

Harron, Rlckard & McCone, Cal. Ag'ts, San Francisco 



24 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 







UNION OIL TOOL 



— 



— 



. ^ ~^ ^ 




INCORPORATFD 





Manufacturers of 



Up=to=Date Drilling 






AND 



Fishing Tools 



F0R6INQ AND MACHINE WORK 



FISHING TOOLS, BITS AND JARS A SPECIALTY 



mi ^^^# AA*AAggA &&A&& 



547 MATEO STREET, 

Phone South 26 Los Angeles, Cal. 

— -«i 



MAPS OF THE OIL FIELDS 



Showing all of the Companies, Wells, Tanks, 
.Etc., in the Kern River, Sunset, Midway, McKit- 
trick and Coalinga Fields. 

These Maps are brought up to date and are ab- 
solutely corrert. They are the only maps that 
show the condition of these fields as they exist 
to-day. 

These maps are Copyrighted by the publishers, 
Barlow & Hill, and can only be used by them and 
their authorized agent in San Francisco, Thb 
Pacific Oij, Rbportbr. 



PRICE LIST OF MAPS. 

Large Blue Prints, 25x25, single map . $1.50 
Large Blue Prints, 25x25, per doz. . . 15.00 

Small Maps, single map 25 

Small Maps, per doz 1.50 

Small Maps, per lOO 10.00 

Small Maps, per 1,000 30.00 

Small Maps, each additional 100 . . . 15.00 

Maps in colors, printed to order, showing in red 
the holdings of any particular company. Folders 
and Prospectuses printed giving maps and show- 
ing location of company's property, with proper 
descriptive matter. 

The above can be obtained oni,y from 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine Street San Francisco, Cal. 



Saw" ;WaY\e\sc/o C.o\. 




JReftned 






/PAPER COVERING 

VARNISHES 

FLUX 

PAVING 

.PIPE DIPPING 

\RESERV01R LINING 



A.OS ASA&t\_t^> 



7HS.SN0 



SUHSET 



0\_tW\ 



fllFW. WW 

METAL COVERING\ 

INSULATING 

PAINT5 

ROOFING 

GROUTING 

WOOD PRESERVING) 







PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 5. No. a. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 14. 1903. 



Prick, Ten Cunts. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Publish.* Wnkli 

Tkc OO Authority of the Pacific Co.it 

Esdsessd Br C.IUor.l. P.troJ..- MIhh' Association 



MRS. MARIA ROSA WINN, Proprietor. 

E. S. EASTMAN, 
Editor and Business Manager 

OFVKB AMD BDlTOaiAL ROOMS 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco, California 

Telephone. Bush 176. 

TERMS 

On y*a. I150 

Six ktoirrtu I SO 

Twin Mouths 1 00 

Shol» conns. ioc 

8TRICTLV IN ADVANCE 

Moitkt ahould be aent by Postal Order, Draft n Registered 
Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil Reporter, 318 Pine street, 8an 
Francisco, rooms 31 -3»-S3. Communications must be accompanied by 
writer's name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
aa a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered in the Poatofflce at San Francisco, California, as second- 
class matter. 

FULTON FOUND DEEP SAND. 

For the past three years and since the 
opening up of the Sunset district, there has 
been a great difference of opinion regarding 
the oil sands that have been discovered or 
may be discovered in future wells. The Ful- 
ton Oil company, in drilling its well No 4 has 
set aside all opinions, having gone through 
the first sand, or the one in which other wells 
in the district are finished ic amounting to 
about 100 feet, and continuing down through 
the clay strata has entered into another and 
richer oil sand having already penetrated it 
over 100 feet and still going down in the best 
sand yet discovered in the district. They 
now have over 225 feet of rich oil bearing 
sand. Tdis places the district at the head of 
those In the country and with transportation 
at hand this district will stand second to none. 

HIGHER PRICES FOR OIL. 



The recent advances in the price of crude 
oil at the wells, and the willingness of the 
Standard Oil company to make long time con- 
tracts at from ten to fifteen cents per barrel 
higher than the present pi ice offered by them 
for immediate delivery, has still further stimu- 
lated development operations in all the Cali- 
fornia fields and the sharp demand for terri- 
tory has caused owners of land in and near 
the proven areas td place high values on their 
holdings. While the search for oil has been 
extended In every direction, there is very 
little hope of materially increasing the produc- 
tion, as most of the wells in the newly devel- 
oped fields are small producers. Operators 
are now confident that fuel oil will soon go to 
50 and 60 cents. 

KERN FIELD ACTIVE. 



The Kern oil field is more active at present 
than at any time during the past three or 
four years. New rigs are going up every- 
where and dozens of wells are going down 
while wells are being pumped to their full 
capacity. Indications are that the field is to 
have the greatest prosperity in Its history. 
Companies have abandoned the practice of 
putting down wells at random and the result 
it that nearly every well is a good producer. 



Many companies follow the practice of put- 
ting a string of wells along the edge of their 
property and when successfully operated on, 
adjoining properties follow the same plan and 
the results are more satisfactory than the old 
haphazard manner of locating wells. 

Coalinga has a daily capacity of about 
12,000 barrels, which is about one-fourth the 
present production of the Kern River field. 



The Exposure of the Ship Trust. 



The proceedings in the ship trust trial 
make the public wish that it could be equally 
well acquainted with the secret history of the 
other trusts. It would be best for the public 
that the entire festering mass should be ex- 
posed at once, In order that the rotten tissue 
may be utterly scraped out and the financial 
organs have a chance to heal. The water Is 
being squeezed out of trusts generally by 
natural processes, but there is evidently a very 
nasty residuum whose removal demands the 
surgery of the courts. One does not wonder 
that "financiers" oppose 'Roosevelt for Presi 
dent on the ground that he favors "publicity.'' 

The course of the cross-examination of 
Lewis Nixon indicates that Schwab's defense 
will be that the Ishlpl trust never had the 
ghost of a chance to live. That theory — 
which Is probably correct — accounts for 
Schwab's and Morgan's insistence that they 
should be allowed to unload their stock first 
and quick, but it does not explain why those 
men should have allowed their names to be 
connected with what .they knew was a rank 
swindle. At least, it does not suggest any 
explanation which those promoters would 
presumably be willing to accept. A multitude 
of trusts have been born. Very few have 
survived. Happy are those who died 
in Infancy. They will be assumed to 
have died Innocent of anything but evl 
intent, and If not now in the paradise of 
departed trusts, to at least be only In purga- 
tory. As for the ship trust and those like it, 
and all who contrived, engineered and pro- 
moted them, their doom can be best described 
and foreshadowed by the most orthodox clergy 
of the sternest denominations. For one thing 
we may be thankful: The "trust issue'' will 
no longer vex American politics except in so 
far as a righteous, non-partisan public senti- 
ment may require a revision of the statutes 
against common swindling. — San Francisco 
Chronicle. 



Standard's New Rule. 



A dispatch says that the fiat will soon be 
promulgated ftom all the offices and auxiliaries 
of the Standard Oil company that drunkards, 
gamblers and cigarette fiends shall be dis- 
charged This has been determined upon by 
the officials of the giant corporation and in the 
future young men who apply for positions 
will be required to present a clean bill of 
health before their applications will be con- 
sidered. At Wilkesbarre, Pa., this rule was 
effective Friday in a branch of the Standard 
Oil company. It was a revelation to the bee 
guzzlers and cigarette fiends, and there was 
a general shaking up of the dry bones. 

The Pacific Oil Reporter $ 2.50 per year. 



Litigati on R enewed* 

Another chapter was added to the famous 
litigation against the Kern Oil company, 
brought by C. A Phelps and compromised by 
the payment of $1,000 to him for his interests, 
when Attorney H. L. Packard obtained per- 
mission this week to file a complaint in Inter- 
vention, by which he claims a one-sixteenth 
interest in the property involved in the suit. 

Phelps, while still a minor, together with 
eight others, located the property now owned 
by the Kern Oil company, and subsequently 
transferred his interest to that corporation at 
the same time as the other locators. 

Later he laid claim to the property on the 
ground that he was a minor at the time he 
signed the deed, and that It was therefore il- 
legal and that he had not been fully advised 
of his rights. He was twenty years old at the 
time and filed suit against the company to re- 
cover royalty for the oil sold by It. Laird & 
Packard were employed as attorneys in the 
case, and Mr. Packard in his complaint filed, 
as mentioned above, alleges that Phelps, after 
becoming of age, deeded to him in return for 
his legal services, one-half of his Interest in 
the property, amounting to one-sixteenth of 
the value of the same. 

Later, Phelps, without, it is alleged, consult- 
ing his attorneys, but allowing them to find it 
out as best they might, signed a deed to the 
company conveying to it his interests for 
$1,000. The suit was for $30,000. Mr. Pack- 
ard desired an accounting for the value of the 
oil taken from the property, judgment for one- 
sixteenth of its value and for any damages 
found to have been done to the property and 
that he be adjudged the owner of a one-six- 
teenth interest therein. 

The Associated Oil company, as the holder 
of a portion of the property under lease from 
the Kern, and the Union Trust company of 
San Francisco, trustee in the case, are to be 
made parties to the suit if the complaint Is 
sustained by the court. 

The original case was one that attracted 
wide-spread attention all over the state as in- 
volving a question of much Importance to oil 
men. 

Hunsaker & Britt and LMrd & Packard are 
the attorneys for the Interventor. — Califor- 
nian. 

Oil fo r Sm elting. 

The uses of oil for fuel are rapidly expand- 
ing, and the fact that it is now being em- 
ployed in smelting is a matter of some interest 
to producers. Commenting on this innova- 
tion the Los Angeles Herald says : 

"If oil is available for the smelting of cop- 
per ore, as demonstrated in Arizona, why may 
it not be utilized in the smelting of iron ? 
That is a question, however, on which only 
experts can give an intelligent opinion, and 
which probably would require practical tests 
before a final decis : on. But if there is no ma- 
terial distinction between copper and iron 
smelting the discovery noted may prove to be 
of great Importance in Los Angeles. Iron ore 
will be one of the products brought to this 
city over the Salt Lake railway, and if the 
cheap local oil can be utilized in its reduction 
the bottom of economic iron making may be 
reached. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



New Oil Fields. 



The new Musgrove oil field, situated nine 
mile northeast of Conroe, Texas, is beginning 
to attract a lot of attention, although there 
seems to have been a special effort made by 
the people interested there to avoid all publi- 
city. Situated as it is, in the heart of the Big 
Thicket, where few people live and none from 
the outside, except an o. casional hunter or 
timber cruiser, ever go, there rises up from 
the level plain a lidge more than fifty feet in 
height, a mile in length and about three- 
quarters of a mile in width. At one end of 
the ridge and extending along the whole end 
of it there is a vast amount of black marl, or 
clay, much resembling and commonly called 
asphalt, which, however, is a misnomer, but 
it was probably at one time saturated with 
oil. Along the whole ridge there are oil indi- 
cations, and near the westerly end of it the 
oil is constantly running out of the ground, 
and an examination of this oil shows it to be a 
paraffine base of an excellent quality. It is 
said to be fully up to the standard of the 



a timber buyer. Day 'after day he went out 
as if looking for timber and attracted no atten- 
tion, but, as it afterward turned out, his trips 
were always to the self-same oil spring and 
the lands within a radius of two miles of it. 

After spending nearly a week in this quiet 
examination he went to Beaumont, where he 
tried to buy the whole property from its re- 
cent purchaser, but it was of no avail, and It 
was only after several days' work that he suc- 
ceeded in getting Mr. Beatty to name a price 
for a half Interest, but as soon as the offer was 
made it was accepted. Speaking of it after- 
ward Mr. Dabney said, that if the price had 
been several times as much it would have 
been accepted just as readily. Up to this time 
Mr. Dabney was thought of simply as a timber 
buyer and it was not until several days after 
the purchase was consummated that it dawned 
upon Mr. Beatty that "Mr. Dabney," and 
Joseph B. Dabney of New York, one of the 
best known oil producers in the United States, 
was one and the same. Mr. Dabney's atten- 
tion had been called to the property by Col- 
onel T. J. Anderson, to whom a sample of the 



small, and thus far there has not been much 
expense from the pumping outfit viewpoint. 
The oil commands a good price, and with con- 
ditions better regulated by a more stable mar- 
ket throughout the entire field, the producer 
will be well satisfied. The quotation at pre- 
sent is made at $1.26 in Neodesha, $1.06 in 
Chanute and $1.04 in Bartlesville. There Is a 
slight difference in other portions of the field, 
due to transportation charges, but the Neo- 
desha price may be taken as the basis of com- 
putation in figuring the average for the field. 
The quotation is equal to that of oil in the 
North Lima district. 



Another Oil Field Found in Texas. 



A special dispatch to the Los Angeles 
Times from Alvin, Texas, says : 

" There is considerable excitement here 
over the oil find in : Wyant No. 2 well on 
Chocolate bayou. Some of the oil is on exhi- 
bition here. It is seemingly a fine quality of 
crude oil. The well is "still disabled from a 
broken pipe fast in the hole, and the work on 
it has been temporarily abandoned while 




Refinery and Tanks of the Standard Oil Company, Point Richmond. 



Corsicana oil, which is now selling at $1.22 at 
the wells. 

It was by accident that knowledge of this 
field came to the outside. About three 
months ago while a timber cruiser was exa- 
mining! the land upon which the spring 
is situated he found it and when 
he told the owner of the land about it he was 
not a little surprised to hear that he had 
known of it for years but never thought of It 
having any value. The cruiser as quickly as 
possible got an option on the land and inter- 
ested Walter Montgomery of Conroe with him. 
They entered into correspondence with D. R. 
Beatty of Beaumont, who went up and after 
spending several days in examining it he 
was so thoroughly convinced that an oil field 
had been discovered that he Immediately 
bought all the land constituting the heart of 
the oil field, amounting to nearly 1,000 acres, 
and paid cash for it. 

The next day after Mr. Beatty had closed 
up his deal for the land there appeared in 
Conroe a very quiet, unassuming man who 
registered from Houston and pretended to be 



oil had been sent from Conroe, Mr. Dabney 
being here at that time making an examina- 
tion of the Beamont, Sour Lake and other 
fields. He is a man of wide practical experi- 
ence in oil producing in both the eastern and 
the California fields and is recognized as a 
very successful man. 

The work of drilling the first well com- 
menced today and is In charge of Claude Mon- 
roe, who has the reputation of being one of 
the best drillers in Beaumont. A good many 
Beaumont, Sour Lake and Corsicana oil men 
have visited the field lately and all speak in 
the highest terms of it, and it is predicted 
they will be here in large numbers and that 
Conroe will soon become quite an oil center. 



Cheap Oil Wells. 



In the Kansas oil field north of Independ- 
ence a well can be put down 800 feet and fully 
equipped and put to pumping for about $1,200. 
In the Independence and southern districts, 
the wells are drilled to about 1,050 to 1,100 
feet, and the actual expense of drilling is a 
little heavier than in the north. The shot is 



Wyant No 3 is being bored. At 1360 feet oil 
sand was found, 140 feet through. A gate 
valve was put on the well during the suspen- 
sion of working. Several days since the well 
was opened and a strong flow of gas followed 
with the smell of crude oil. A small bucket 
was lowered by wire and at the depth of 1300 
feet encountered oil and was drawn out nearly 
full of pure oil. Since then oil continues to 
rise. 

"Frank Draden, an English oil expert, who 
is general manager of English oil wells in Ger- 
many and Austria, has been here to investi- 
gate the oil fields of Texas. He visited the 
Wyant wells and expressed himself as satis- 
fied that a fine strike had been made which 
would develop another oil field. W. Wyant, 
manager of the Amsterdam Oil company, bor- 
ing on Chocolate bayou, in an Interview says: 
' We are beyond the experimental stage now, 
and know just what to look for. Oil is oozing 
out of our No. 2 well, and can be drawn out 
by the bucketful.' " 



The subscription price of the Pacific Oil 
Reporter Is $2.50 per year. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Oil For metallurgical Operations. 



Metallurgical operations naturally stand 
fint for consideration among the miscellaneous 
applications of oil fnel, as they offer every 
inducement for the satisfactory working of 
a medium possessing such valuable heat gen- 
erating properties. As is well known, of the 
heat produced in fnrnaces for melting metal 
the proportion Imparted to and usefully 
employed in reducing the material is com- 
paratively small and disappointing. To rem- 
edy the excessive consumption of fuel and 
economize in the absorption ot heat by unre- 
munerative construction many ingenious 
arrangements of furnace have been devised; 
but although the more wasteful features have 
been eliminated and unceasing efforts have 
been made to stcure the greatest economy, 
the losses inherent to furnaces designed for 
the utilization of solid fuel remain. 

With oil fuel the conditions of working are 
so modified that many of the disadvantages 
and losses In coal furnace heating are no 
longer present, and an economy results which 
guarantees to the liquid a value satisfactory 
as compared to its solid rivals. The price of 
hard or furnace coke has reached a very high 
figure in many places, and, in fact, in all 
those parts of the country remote from the 
coal fields, whereas the cost of fuel oil is at its 
lowest In many of those localities. Apart, 
however, from any direct pecuniary advantage 
due to cost of fuel required for similar work, 
the prospect of greatly Increasing the output 
by substituting oil fuel for coal or coke in 
many industrial operations offers a substantial 
inducement. This Increased production is 
secured by the easy and exact regulation ob- 
tainable, the uniformity of the heat generated 
and their concentration of the operative's 
attention and labor to the work in hand. 

The possibility of obtaining a satisfactory 
liquid fuel in bulk at a price commensurate 
with its heating value has naturally led to 
many improvements in the methods of its 
utilization for industrial purposes. For steam 
raising more ingenuity has been devoted to 
the design of "burners" perhaps than to the 
construction of the furnaces, although the lat- 
ter is as important as the former. For heat- 
ing and melting metals and for various manu- 
facturing operations attention has necessarily 
been concentrated more on the furnaces 
required, and some very satisfactory arrange- 
ments have been evolved and put into oper- 
ation. Accepting the heavy Texas oil as the 
fuel to be used, this possesses a calorific value 
of about 19,500 B. T. U. per pound, and, owing 
to its character, is best used with the "spray" 
method of burning, air being employed as the 
disintegrating medium when an Intense and 
concentrated heat is required, and ste?m 
where a soft and more diffused high tempera- 
ture is desirable. 

For scrap welding or bloom heating, oil fuel 
is well adapted. The melting and reducing 
of metals to which oil fuel has been largely 
applied possess pecuniary promising features, 
and the results obtained are convincing of its 
efficiency for the purpose. In brass foundries 
a considerable item of expense exists in the 
provision of the crucibles or "pots" for holding 
the metal, none of which can well be made 
available for more than 35 heats, whereas if 
oil fuel is taken advantage of, the metal can 
be reduced direct in bulk without the employ- 
ment of crucibles. Where large castings are 
required and one peculiar mixture of metal is 
desired, this is of great importance. — Cassier's 
Magazine. 



Kern Oil Has Invaded the South. 



That the producers of the Kern county oil 
fields are branching out in all directions and 
invading the territory of other producers Is 
shown by the following which appeared in the 
Los Angeles Times of the 4th : 

" Kern oil in considerable quantities is find- 
ing its way into the tanks of local consumers 
of liquid fuel. Althongh efforts have been 
made to cover up their tracks, the fact is 
known that both the Standard and the Asso- 
ciated companies are bringing in the northern 
oil and have already closed several important 
contracts far long time delivery. 

" When an effort was made several weeks 
ago by local jobbers to force the price of crude 
a little In advance of what the market would 
stand, the big jobbers of the state took advan- 
tage of the opening and invaded the territory. 
The result is they have captured contracts 
that local jobbers were after. Not the least of 
these is a three-year contract with the Los 
Angeles Lighting company. It is reported 
that the Associated OH company has just got 
this plum and that the agreement provides for 
a price between 71 and 75 cents a barrel. 

" Seven carloads of northern oil were re- 
ceived here last week, which is the largest 
single shipment on record. Much of this oil 
is obtained in the Sunset and Kern River dis- 
tricts and the price paid between 70 and 75 
cents a barrel. As the Sunset product aver- 
ages close to 17 gravity, it is in great demand 
and probably large quantities could be placed 
at that figure. 

"Jobbers in local oil quote the product at 75 
cents a barrel and report that there is little 
prospect for a rise until after the fall rains. 
There is a good demand for the home oil, how- 
ever, in spite of the large influx of northern 
product." 



Oil Well Pumping System in Canada. 

The average output of all the oil wells in 
Canada does not exceed one-half barrel per 
day, yet thousands are operated and with very 
few exceptions all are pumped. After put- 
ting down the wells the operators establish 
the engine plant at some convenient location, 
and by a system of suspended rods, transmit 
the power to the wells. At each stroke of the 
engine a large wheel turns forward and back 
giving a reciprocating horizontal motion to the 
rods and a vertical motion to the connected 
pump rods. The mixed oil and water is forced 
up into tanks having holes for the water to 
flow out while the oil remains behind. Every 
day the man in charge drives around with his 
tank cart and draws off the collected oil. 

No other system could fill the requirements 
of the case as well as this one, as the wells 
being small producers a separate engine is out 
of the question, and no water power is at 
hand. In one field one engine operates 
nearly 100 wells and all the labor required is 
the one man who attends the engine and 
boiler (oil is used as fuel) and keeps the appa- 
ratus in working order. It will be easily seen 
that repairs must be very slight. 

Favors Oil on Lobos Avenue. 



Petroleum Prices and Production 



City Engineer Grunsky has reported to the 
Board of Public Works on the petition of the 
Point Lobos Improvement Club for permission 
to oil Point Lobos avenue from Central to 
Twenty-fourth avenues. He said that the 
mere application of oil would lay the dust and 
cost only $700, but he recommended that the 
macadam be shoothed down and a coating of 
oil and ground rock be applied at a cost of 
$25,000. — Chronicle. 



Eastern petroleum markets are decidedly 
bullish, and prices are advancing weekly. 
The successive higher bids have brought out 
a good deal of oil that was held In tanks or on 
certificates of pipe-line companies, but the 
expectation of still higher prices influences 
many producers to continue to hold their oil. 
If offerings are not freely made to the pur- 
chasing agencies at present figures, thete is 
likely to be a fall in prices soon. The advance 
was made to Induce holders to sell their oil, 
and the usual policy in the past has been to 
shake out tardy sellers by suddenly dropping 
the bids a few cents, which has been found 
quite as effective in stimulating sales as would 
be a corresponding advance in prices. It 
would not be surprising, therefore, to see 
lower prices named for crude, because so long 
as holders have reason to expect continutd 
advances they are encouraged to keep theit 
oil rather than sell it; and the object of the 
higher bids is to bring out more oil. 

That the oil trade generally expects higher 
prices is evidenced from the fact that oil cer- 
tificates have been selling as high as 9 cents 
per barrel above the spot oil. That is, oil in 
tanks is considered a profitable property to 
held, in view of the probability that prices 
will soon be much higher. Trading in certi- 
ficates is not what it was in the old days 
when the oil exchanges were very active. 
Then it was not uncommon for speculators to 
bull or bear the market by large purchases of 
sales daily, and the actual spot price of oil 
was largely influenced by speculation 1c cer- 
tificates. Of late years the exchanges have 
lost their importance, and most of the business 
of buying and selling oil has been confined to 
the purchasing agencies. 1 hey make the 
price, by bidding high or low as suits their 
purpose in calling out the reserves. But it 
has been pointed out recently that speculators 
could easily corner the certificate market now 
if they would work in unison, and by so doing 
might advance the price of oil to a very high 
figure. That this is not likely to be done is 
due to the fact that no one large interest 
desires it. 

The effort to secure a greater production cf 
oil will be redoubled in the eastern fields 
under the stimulus of high prices, but the 
fact remains t 1 at similar efforts put forth con- 
tinuously during the past year have not met 
with signal success. There has not been a 
dull month in the year just passed, yet the 
production has steadily declined. In the 
absence of new discoveries the best that can 
be done is to make the old wells produce a 
little more and to drill wells where test wells 
have been drilled and oil found in small 
quantities but not operated on account of a 
low market. The amount of new work that 
will be started at old wells under this stimu- 
lus will be considerable. New derricks will 
be erected over many abandoned wells, and 
they will be cleaned out and, if possib'e, reju- 
venated. Their production, while small indi- 
vidually, will be considerable in the aggre- 
gate. Even half-barrel wells will be worth 
working under economical conditions. Arid 
while we may not expect to see much new 
production of Pennsylvania and other high 
grade oils, there will be a marked improve- 
ment in the situation due to larger results 
from present territory.— Paint, Oil and Drug 
Review. 



The subscription price of the Pacific Oil 
Rkportkr is $2.50 per year. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



yy&irffl gfffl M ff Pj ft ' 



NEWS FROM TDE FIELD 



I 



Supplied by our Regular Correspondents 



:&££sssa£Sifisa: 



Coalings Letter. 




COAI.INGA, NOV. 9, I903. 

The El Zuma company is busy, rigging up 
on No. 4. 

The drillers are busy rigging up on the 
Stockholders' company's No. 2. 

The Blue Diamond well is 1,320 feet deep, 
with 5^-inch casing in the hole. 

The lumber for the Section Seven Oil com- 
pany's water well is on the ground. 
&The Hanford Oil company's No. 5 is 1,050 
feet deep, and through the first sand. 

The rig-builders are now at work on No. 3 
derrick of the New San Francisco Crude. 

The El Capitan' No. 3 is a Httle over 300 
feet dtep, with n^-inch casing in the hole. 

R. C. Baker, on the St. Paul lease, No. 2, is 
about 250 feet deep, with 220 feet of g$i inch 
casing in the hole. 

Confidence OH company will commence 
operations on south sixty acres of their lease 
in the near future. 

A string of stove pipe casing is being put in 
the Keystone company's No. 1 well, to shut 
out the running sand. 

K. C, No. 4 is making hole again on this 
well, after a few days' trouble with the casing. 
It is about 550 feet deep. 

The Esperanza company is grading for a 
20,000- barrel iron tank, to be erected on their 
property in the uear future. 

Chicago Limited company is at work, pull- 
ing the casing from its No. 1 well, and will 
start No. 2 in the near future. 

Thomas O'Donnell's No. 1 well on section 7 
is 900 feet deep with 10 inch pipe. Number 
2 is 875 feet deep, with 8-inch pipe. 

Westmoreland-Coalinga Oil company, on 
section 34-19-15, is down about 300 feet in 
their No. 1 well, with a 16-inch hole. 

Cmbon's No. 3 is 1125 feet deep, with mo 
feet of 55^-inch casing in the hole. It is 
through the first sand and in a clay formation. 

The Pacific Coast Oil company has just 
completed a four-inch line to the Wabash Oil 
company and within a few days will be re- 
ceiving oil from there. 

A crew of men is busy erecting a derrick on 
the SW^ of section 26-19-15. We understand 
that the work of drilling iwill be started as 
soon as things are in shape. 

The Mercantile Crude company's No. 3 is 
through the sand at a depth of 960 feet and 
is now being finished. A string of 5f£-inch 
casing was used to go through the sand. 

The eighty acres of land situated on sec- 
tion 30, 20-15, known as the Perry Phillip's 
land, was recently purchased by H. C. Kerr 
for other parties. The price was $12,000. 

The Twenty-eight Oil company has finished 
deepening its No. 8 well to a depth of 1 475 
feet, going through the main sand which was 
not penetrated in drilling the other wells. 

Mr. N. L. Palmer of Fresno has opened up 
a real estate and insurance office in town. 
Mr. Palmer owns section 16, 20-14 which, 
together with other oil lands he offers for sale. 

Commercial Petroleum company's No. 3 is 
about 700 feet deep, with ten-inch pipe. No. 
4 Is 450 feet deep, with a thirteen-lnch hole. 
Ten-inch drive pipe will be used for the first 
String. 

The Independence company's No. 8 well 



has developed a quantity of gas and was put 
on the pump again Monday after a few days' 
fighting. It is producing in fine shape at 
present. 

Canfield & Corey lost a joint of casing in 
their well this week. The casing was pulled 
and the lost joint recovered. The drillers are 
making hole again, having replaced the nsj 
string of casing. 

The Stockholder's Oil company's second rig, 
on section 28, is ready and drilling will begin 
by the end of the week at the latest. No. 1 
well of this company is producing at the rate 
of 300 barrels per day. 

Pennsylvania Operating, Mining and De- 
veloping company, located on section 12, 20-14, 
is about 150 feet deep. The well was started 
with 1 4-inch tools, and a string of i3j£-inch 
casing is now being put in. 

Section Seven Oil company's No 3 is 325 
feet deep, with a 13-inch hole. A string of 
io-inch pipe will be used for the first string. 
Number 2 well has not been put In working 
order. Number 1 is still flowing. 

Roberts Oil company of Coalinga has fin- 
ished its No. r well, at a depth of 820 feet, and 
is now baling. The well was finished with a 
string of 5^-inch casing. From all indica- 
tions the well will be a good one. 

The Oil City Petroleum company has added 
another r,2oo-barrel storage tank which gives 
this company a total storage capacity of 3.500 
barrels, to care for its production from seven 
producing wells. Its eighth well is in the oil 
sand. 

The school house recently purchased by 
Mrs. A. Bennett will be moved to town this 
week. Additions will be made to it, and 
when completed it will contain thirty rooms 
and will be used by Mrs. Bennett as a lodging 
house. 

The Maine State No. 6 is 740 feet deep with 
12-inch drive pipe in the hole. Number 4 is 
producing in fine style. It is on the pump, 
which seems only to agitate things at the bot- 
tom of the well, as the oil is flowing without 
regard to the stroke of the pump. 

The tank builders for the Pacific Coast Oil 
company are now building the second tank, 
located on section 27. After completing 
this tank they will proceed to replace the 
roofs for the two 35,000-barrel tanks which 
were blown off during a windstorm. 

B. R. Phillips, of Fresno, who represents 
the Continental Building and Loan Associa- 
tion, of San Francisco, spent several days in 
town recently. Mr. Phillips states that his 
company is one of the largest in the United 
States, and the most solid on this coast. 

A company bearing the name of the Cali- 
fornia Coast Oil company has purchased the 
E^ and the NWX of section 20, and the Ej£ 
and the NW3^ of section 30, 21-15. This land 
was formerly owned by the Colonial Oil com- 
pany and the transfer was made through Mr. 
E- W. Babcock. 

The Esperanza Oil company has com- 
pleted the installation of an electric plant to 
obviate the danger incurred from touches and 
lamps. The entire lease will be Illumined 
with from twenty- five to thirty lights. The 
company is making good progress on its No. 
4 well which was spudded in last Monday 
week. 

Pleasant Valley Farming company's No. 1 
is through the first pay sand at a depth of 
about 1,200 feet, and is being drilled deeper 
to prospect the territory. This is a fine hole, 
being drilled in with only two strings of cas- 
ing — one string of io-inch drive and one string 
of 75^-inch casing. Number 2 is 500 feet deep, 
with a string of io-inch line pipe in the hole. 



The Genesee Oil company, a newly organ- 
ized company, is having the lumber for its 
first rig hauled to its lease in the SW# of 
section 31, i9-rs, where work will begin in the 
near future. This company is to operate on 
positively proven territory, being surrounded 
by the El Capitan on the north, Maine State 
on the east, and Mercantile Crude and York- 
Coalinga on the south. Messrs. Murdock, 
Ingels, and Miles we understand are the pro- 
moters. 

The Union Oil company of California's No. 
2 well is about 700 feet deep with one string 
of io-inch line pipe to that depth. Number 3 
is something over 300 feet deep and has been 
shut down for a few days on account of a lack 
of water. A three-inch line has been laid 
from the Union lease to the Wabash, where 
the water for the Union is obtained, and the 
work of making hole on No. 3 resnmed. This 
company has just erected two 1200 barrel 
tanks on its property. 

Another new oil company, the Kaweah Oil 
company, is having a rig built on section 14, 
19-15. This land was in dispute as to the 
rightful locators but was amiably settled by 
all claimants combining and drilling a well to 
prove the territory. Just at present there is 
considerable attention directed to that por- 
tion of the field. At first the Octave Oil com- 
pany came to section 22, a short time ago the 
Peerless purchased a quarter section in 22, 
and now the Kaweah is locating on section 14 
adjoining 22. 

R. M. D. 



A Million Barrel Oil Fire. 



The full offect of the great fire late in Sep- 
tember in the Bibi Eibat oil field of Russia is 
just now becoming known. At Nobels 'prop- 
erty there were 17 derricks destroyed, in ad- 
dition to steam engines, reservoirs, wharf, 
pump-house, dwelling-house, 60,000 poods of 
crude oil and about 1,000,000 poods of crude 
oil from the Ogulovitch spouter. On one of 
the plots of the Baku Russian Petroleum com- 
pany five derricks were destroyed, while at 
the Baku Naphtha company four pumping 
derricks and five drilling ones and 700,000 
poods of crude oil met a similar fate. The 
damage of the Caspian and Black Sea society's 
property was also great, and included 15 der- 
ricks, three tanks, a building containing air 
compressors, 35 000 poods of crude and about 
2,500,000 poods of spouter oil from the Ognle- 
vitch property, and on group 20, belonging to 
Zoubaloff, six pumping derricks and five drill- 
ing ones, an open reservoir, and about 3,000,- 
000 poods of oil from the Ogulevitch spouter 
were destroyed. With regard to the Schiba- 
leff company, three pumping derricks, two 
tanks, office, boiler bouse, wharf, 60,000 poods 
of crude and 200,000 poods of oil from the 
Ogulevitch spouter were burned, while the 
properties of Miloff and Ogulevitch also have 
severe losses, which include over 500,000 
poods of crude oil, this being in addition to 
the heavy oil losses Ogulevitch has sustained 
as recorded above. 

This makes a total loss of over 8,000,000 
poods, which at eight poods to the barrel, is 
equivalent to 1,000,000 barrels. 



FOR SALE 

A complete oil well drilling 
outfit near Huntington, Ore- 
gon. Inventory and price 
on application to 

H. V. GATES, Hillsboro, Oregon. 



PACIFIC OIL RBPORTBR 



The Chanute Oil Field. 



Although the discovery of oil in Chanute. 
Kan«as dates back a number of years, the 
field is new In point of development. Only 
about a year and a half ago did the people 
become alive to the situation, since which 
time there has been a steady Influx of capital 
and development work has progressed at a 
rate that has opened many producing wells 
and put the field on a basis of permanency 
that cannot be questioned. 

In June 1901, a company composed of Kan- 
sas City and eastern capitalists entered the 
field. The first wall was drilled on the 
Rosenthal tract northeast of Chanute and 
proved to be a splendid gusher. Since that 
time companies galore have been formed and 
the work of testing outlying territory is being 
carried on with most gratifying results. Al- 
ready the proven field has assumed propor- 
tions which make the limited area of Beau- 
mont'sink into insignificance. Indeed, one 
must come in touch with the field and become 
familiar with its workings to realize Its dimen- 
sions or to attempt to estimate its probable 
value. 

The belt is known to extend from Neosho 
Falls, Kansas to Red Fork, Indian territory, 
ninety miles away, with a general width of 
approximately fifty miles. The drills have 
demonstrated that there Is a tract running in 
a direct air-line northwest to southeast vary- 
ing from three-fourths of a mile to a mile and 
one-half in width, and a known distance over 
six miles in length within which every hole 
sunk Is certain to find oil in paying quantities. 

At the present time there are three defined 
oil trends with Intervening gas trends, prov- 
ing up the territory for a distance of fifteen 
miles from north to south and eight miles 
from east to west. Over this region are scat- 
tered between 400 and 500 producing wells, 
together with about half that number of gas 
wells. Because of the publicity which has 
been given to the oil business, the Chanute 
section Is generally spoken of by outsiders as 
nothing but an oil field; this is a decided mis- 
take, as Chanute and the contiguous territory 
have as large a supply of natural gas as any 
other section of the Kansas-Indian territory 
belt. These gas interests are being fast de 
veloped at the present time, and are attract- 
ing much deserved attention. 

The Standard's Opportunity. 



Eastern Oil Exhaustion. 



Reports indicating rapid exhaustion of the 
natural oil supply in the eastern stifles have 
been current at times In recent years. Facts 
are now disclosed by the Standard Oil com- 
pany which leave no doubt about the correct- 
ness of such statements. The Pennsylvania 
and Ohio oil fields appear to be nearly ex- 
hausted, and those of West Virginia are fail- 
ing rapidly. Indiana still shows a consider- 
able output, but there is evident diminution 
in the supply. No new fields appear to be 
discoverable, as the Standard Oil company 
has prospected every promising section in the 
eastern states. As a consequence of the 
shortness of supply and the gloomy outlook, 
the Standard has notified Independent refiners 
that it can no longer furnish them with crude 
oil. Some of the refiners have already sus- 
pended business and quite a general suspen- 
sion is expected. 

California and Texas are now regarded as 
the American oil producing states of the 
future. The Texas product is uncertain, as 
experience has proved, and no reliable esti- 
mate can be made of it as an industry of the 
future. The California oil deposits, however, 
have been worked In places for many years 
without any evidence of exhaustion In the 
general field It is from California that the 
oil supply of the future must largely come, 
and the Industry must expand in this state in 
proportion to the natural increase in demand 
and the decrease in supply from the oil fields 
in the east. — Los Angeles Herald. 



Deepest Oil Well. 

The deepest oil well In the state is at Olinda 
and is owned by the Santa Fe. It is well No 
38, which has been put to a depth of 2,846 
feet, and is carrying a seven-Inch pipe. The 
well is not producing at present, the company 
desiring to run it as far below the surface as 
possible before pumping. There are expecta- 
tions that a gusher will be developed In the 
well which will eclipse any so far struck in 
this state. Well No. 34 is the next deepest 
being down 2,810 feet and a big producer. 

Mention this paper when writing to our ad- 
vertisers. 



We Want to Purchase 

Superior Stock 
Monarch Stock 
Lion Stock 

STOCK, BOND & INVES. SYNDICATE, 
515 Examiner Bldg., San Francisco. 



We manufacture the best 

lubricating oils for oil 

drillers 

KING KEYSTONE OIL CO., 

116 Front St., San Erancisco. 



Three months ago the Russian government 
sold at auction extensive petroleum fields in 
the Caucasus. The French, Austrian and 
German branches of the Rothschilds bought 
the property, whereupon rival bidders ob- 
jected to the sale on the grounds that Jews 
were not permitted tc acquire property in the 
Caucasus. 

The Rothschilds claimed that their firm was 
impersonal, being neither Jews and Gentiles. 
The case was carried through all the Russian 
courts to the Senate, which has now decided 
against the Rothschilds on the ground that 
they are Hebrews. 

The fields will shortly be placed on sale 
again and it is expected that the Standard 
Oil company will bid against the German 
syndicate. 

The margin of profit is so much in favor of 
the refiner and against the producer that 
there is little encouragement to drill. It Is a 
.•shell" game" and the Standard manipulate 
the shells.— Sun. 



We Make 
Tanks 




k W < \. « 



4, ^ — »-—»<■ — V » 



>. v v v «. 



"^""" e. co 4 *■ 




Pacific Oit Reporter is $2.50 per year 



We Build Galvanized Iron Tanks 

For oil, water and fuel purposes. Estimates cheerfully given on any kind of tank. 
Being situated near the Coalinga fields, we are in a position to make extremely low prices 
We have supplied nearly every galvanized iron tank now in use at the Coalinga oil fields. 

KUTNER, GOLDSTEIN CO. 

HANFORD 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Oiled Roads. 



California was the first state to make use of 
crude petroleum in improving roads. The 
experiment was first tried in 1898, when six 
miles of very dusty road were oiled under the 
direction of the board of supervisors of Los 
Angeles county. That the use of oil for this 
purpose was highly practicable was soon 
demonstrated by the condi.ion of the road 
which had been sprinkled. The original 
motive was to lay the dust, which had become 
a serious hindrance to travel and had made 
life a burden to all those dwelling along the 
highway. In addition, considerable areas of 
vegetation on both sides of the road had been 
totally or practically destroyed by the settling 
dust. 

There are now at least twenty-fiVe counties 
In California which have used crude petroleum 
upon their roads, while experiments have 
been made in Colorado, Texas, Indiana, Penn- 
sylvania and the District of Columbia. From 
the Mexican border of San Diego county to 
Butte county, about 500 miles to the north in 
a straight line, in soils of various consistencies 
and through regions of widely different cli- 



James W. Abbott of the office of public road 
inquiries, department of agriculture, has 
thoroughly investigated the benefits from the 
use of oil on roads. Mr. Abbott writes In the 
year book as follows: 

"Tn California It was soon learned that, 
Incalculably valuable as it was, the laying cf 
dust was not the only or even the most extra- 
ordinary result obtained. It was found that 
when oil was applied it immediately began to 
bind together the loose particles constituting 
tne road surface, whelher clay, sandy loam, 
loose snd, gravel or the fine material on top 
of the macadam. A tough stratum formed, 
resembling an asphalt pavement. Roads 
built on drifting sand or clayey dust, no mat- 
ter how deep, where trotting with a buggy 
was impossible and for a pair of strong horses 
to pull a ton was a very laborious process, 
became indurated, resilient and firm, so that 
driving teams could trot with ease and the 
same pair of horses pull two and a half tons 
more comfortab.y than they formerly did the 
one ton. Of course, these results were not 
fully obtained, immediately, but they never 
failed to follow persistent treatment with oil. 

"At first, while this oiled surface stratum 



road of about the same grade which was so 
badly washed that it could not be used until 
it was repaired — a road that was not oiled. 
Between Pomona and Freeman a great quan- 
tity of water came from a canyon and struck 
the oiled road at right angles at one point. It 
came from the west, and on the east side of 
taat road theie was a margin of six to eight 
inches of the surfacing material that the oil 
had tot touched. The rain passed over 
the oiled surface, and when it came to that 
which was not oiled it cut it right out. Upon 
the same road within the city limits of Pomona 
the road was surfaced with decomposed gran- 
ite, packed down hard, and a very nice road 
during the summer, but it had not been oiled. 
The same storm cut it all to pieces. On one 
stretch of a quarter of a mile the road material 
was fairly washed out into the fields along- 
side of the road." 

One of the chief objections to oil is after 
the roads have been first treated, the oil has a 
tendency to clot up and fly about when 
driven over by a rapidly moving vehicle. 
But as soon as the oil becomes thoroughly 
diffused, the ground becomes coated with a 
hard firm crust which does not become mater- 




Oil City, First Part of Coalinga to be Devoloped. 



matic conditions, mineral oil has been used 
upon country roads and city streets, until 
there are, it is estia ated, more than 950 miles 
of oiled roads iu California. Oil has been 
used upon the driveways in Golden Gate 
Park, San Francisco. The mountain stage 
road into the Yosemite National Park has 
been oiled for a distance of thirty miles, while 
in San Bernardino county, running south 
from the railroad track in the town of Chino, 
is a piece of oiled road over which every sea- 
son nearly 40,000 tons of sugar beets are 
hauled on their way to the factory, often aver- 
aging 750 tons a day. The foundation of this 
road is a loese sand and before oil was applied 
loaded wagons were often stalled and had to 
be dug out. The road was surfaced with a 
material containing some clay. Now, after 
being subjected to oil for three seasons, it is 
as easy to drive over as a good city street, 
and although the majority of wagons used 
upon it have narrow tires, it effectually sus- 
tains the heavy travel. The utility of the 
oil was noticeable after its first application, 
but the surface stratum grew constantly 
thicker and firmer, until the road is practi- 
cally perfect. 



was thin, it was often broken through, espe- 
cially in wet weather, but proper repairs and 
subsequent applications of oil thickened and 
strengthened it until it would at all times 
effectually withstand the heaviest and most 
continuous travel." 

Oiled roads seem to have a capacity to re- 
sist washouts and rains. Theodore F. White, 
a civil engineer of Chino, San Bernardino 
county, who has made a special study of the 
use of mineral oil on roads, has the following 
to say of the resistant power of the road when 
so treated. Ten and one-half inches of rain 
fell in the storm Mr. White mentions, six 
inches of it falling in a single night. He 
says: 

"The whole country was flooded and it 
gave us a good test of our oiled roads. There 
is a road running into San Bernardino on a 
grade of about 6 per cent, about 300 or 400 
fe^t from a bench down into a creek bottom. 
The road had been oiled a second season and 
there was a good oiled surface. The water 
rushed down the middle of that road, because 
the ditches could not carry such a great vol- 
ume of it, and it did not make a scratch on 
the road, but a half mile south there was a 



lally softened by the heat of the sun. The 
odor, too, disappears. 

Good roads mean more to the farmer than 
to the city man. They mean better access to 
market, to schools, to churches, and to neigh- 
bors. They lighten the work of the farmer 
and of his stock. They mean easier communi- 
cation with the outside world. The weather 
in California does not tend to make the roads 
so disagreable as in some of the eastern states 
in spring and fall. The use of oil does away 
with dusty and heavy roads and many per- 
sons regard it as the most important discovery 
ever made in road-making. 

Oil has been found successful upon roads 
without regard to its variety. An important 
point is in its distribution. In some tank 
wagons steam coils are used, while in others 
the heat of the sun is deemed sufficient. 

The cost of oiling roads is slight indeed 
compared with other methods of road treat- 
ment. For the first oiling of road from Wood- 
land to Capay, a distance of twenty, miles, the 
cost was $200. The road was gravelled but 
very dusty, and after some little travel became 
very good. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Drawing on Storage Oil. 



More Texas oil is Id storage at the present 
time than at any period in the history of the 
field. It is estimated by various operators, fa- 
miliar with the situation, that not less than 
13.000,000 barrels of the product of Sour Lake 
and Beaumont wells is above ground ami some 
place the figures as high as 14.000,000 barrels. 

In arriving at a grand total, the principal 
stocks are estimated as follows : 

J. M. Guffey Petroleum company — Sour 
Lake, Beaumont, Port Arthur, New Orleans 
and eastern stations, 4.500,000 barrels. 

Security Oil company (Burt Refinery)— 
Beaumont, Sour Lake and Sabine Pass, 3,000,- 
000 barrels. 

The Texascompany — Beaumont, Sour Lake, 
Port Arthur, Sabine Pass and New Orleans 
2,000,000 barrels. > 

Southern Pacific company — Texas and 
Louisiana points, 1,500.000 barrels. 

Higgins Oil and Fuel company — Beaumont 
and Sour Lake, 500,000 barrels. 

Sun company — Beaumont, Sun and eastern 
stations, 200,000 barrels. 

Santa Fe railroad — Various points on Gulf 
Division, 200,000 barrels. 

International and Great Northern railroad 
— Points in Texas, 100,000 barrels. 

Sour Lake and Beaumont miscellaneous 
storage — 1,500,000 barrels, including oil in 
storage at other points and in the east. 

On August 1 the amount of Texas oil in 
storage was put at 7,500,000 to 8,000,000 bar- 
rels. The great increase in stocks siDce that 
time may be attributed diiectly to the very 
large production at Sour Lake. For avhile 
the production there was easily 75,000 barrels 
a day, although it has now fallen to a figure 
that varies from 50,000 to 60,000 barrels dally. 

The pipe lines of the Guffey company and 
the Texas company are taking from 24.000 to 
26.000 barrels a day to Beaumont and Port 
Arthur, the Southern Pacific company from 
the 1st to the 12th of October, averaged 86 
cars a day, including all shipments. Most of 
these cass are of 300 barrels capacity each, 
and it is a conservative estimate to make the 
average capacity 275 barrels. 

Other shipments briDg the output to a fig- 
ure greater than the capacity of the wells and 
the day is not far distant when the great re- 
serve in storage will be exhausted and then, 
unless some new field comes in that Is now 
unheard of, California, with its great and in- 
exhaustible supply, will be called on to fill 
the deficiency. Is it a wonder, then, that our 
railway companies had rather buy their oil at 
the present prices than produce it themselves 
from their vast tracts of oil land, preferring to 
hold this in reserve for the day when oil shall 
go above a dollar a barrel. 



•nother Power in the Oil Field. 



The Associated Oil company would have 
done well to have entered as principal into 
the deal between its allied corporations and 
the Southern Pacific — either that or have 
pooled the stock which it so liberally distri- 
buted in payment to the different corporations 
whose shares were absorbed by the association. 
It took a long period of negotiations to con- 
solidate all these interests in this association, 
wich its millions of dollars capital, and a 
thankless job it seems to have baen. In con- 
solidating these various companies only those 
of the first magnitude as producers were of 
course selected, and it must be heart-rending 
for the parent corporation to have the South- 
ern Pacific quietly gobbling up all the choice 



plums by the very business-like method of 
buying up the associated stock which they 
hold at a certificate tf their allegiance to the 
big company which had evidently not ex- 
pected such a move on the part of a rival 
orgati/atlon. I iming the week the railroad 
company, which needs oil ia Its extensive 
business, paid $2,400,000 for the holdings of 
the Reed Crude and the San Joaquin Oil com- 
pany In Associated stock, of which the former 
received 51,560,000 and the latter $840,000. 
Not long ago the Bear Flag company, also 
allied with Associated Oil company, parted 
with Its holding to the same Luyers, and it is 
now said the big Kern Oil company has 
decided to distribute its stock in the Asso- 
ciated Oil company among its individual 
stockholders, who will then be in a position to 
do as they please with it, and it is easy to 
understand what that means. The railroad 
people ought soon to have stock enough to 
control the Associated Oil company, the old 
management of which seems to have been so 
blind to their own interest. — News Letter. 



New Petroleum Bi-Product. 



Oil of sandalwood, which is one of the most 
valuable substances known to the perfumer, 
affording an exceedingly delicate and delicious 
scent, has at last been made by synthesis. It 
was purely an accident. Dr. David T. Day 
of the United States Geological Survey was 
making some small chemical experiments the 
other day on the mantel shelf of his office in 
Washington. He had some crude petroleum 
from a Texas well, and was putting it through 
various processes, more for amusement than 
anything else, when he noticed that the liquid 
resulting from a certain "reaction" had a 
powerful odor. It was too strong to be agree- 
able to the nostrils, but he moistened a bit of 
paper with the fluid, and, waving it in front 
of his nose, perceived immediately that the 
smell was that of sandalwood oil. He had 
obtained, quite by chance, an artificial oil of 
sandalwood — impure.it is true, but easily sus- 
ceptible of purification by refining. 

The discovery is believed to be of great 
value commercially, but Dr. Day has too much 
scientific business on hand to bother with ex- 
ploiting a synthetic perfume, and makes the 
world welcome to his lucky "find." Inasmuch 
as the oil can be got from petroleum in end- 
less quantities at a very cheap rate, it is likely 
to drive the ordinary sandalwood oil, which is 
obtained by distillation from the wood, out of 
the market. The destructive white ant of 
India and China, which devours nearly every, 
thing save metals, will not touch sandalwood, 
and that is one reason why so much of it is 
made up into caskets, boxes and similar 
articles that come from Asia. Most people 
are familiar with the agreeable perfume of 
boxes made of this material. — Saturday Even- 
ing Post. 

makes Big Contract. 

The Southern Pa: c railroad has made a 
deal of some magnitude for Saratoga Texas 
oil. A contract was closed with the Beau- 
mont, Texas, Petroleum Fluid and Liquid 
Fuel company (the McFaddin syndicate) to 
take the output of its four Saratoga wells for 
a period of sixty days. The output of the 
four McFaddin wells is estimated at not less 
than 5,000 barrels per day, which will give 
the Southern Pacific 300,000 barrels at the end 
of the term. 



When writing to advertisers always men- 
ion the Pacific Oil Rkportbr. 



Sues Oil Exchange. 

W. E. DeGroot and E. Sutro have com- 
menced a suit against the Bakersfield Oil and 
Stock Exchange, John A. Bunting, Solomon 
Jewett H. A. Blodget, G. A. Hare and Clar- 
ence J. Berry to compel the defendants (ex- 
cept the corporation defendant) to return and 
turn over to the corporation all of the stock 
obtained by the defendants from the corpora- 
tion, either individually or collectively, by 
reason and virtue of resolutions passed, by 
and through which the defendants took to 
themselves certain shares of stock of the cor- 
poration, or in lieu theieof, if such stock can- 
not be returned, to pay the corporation for 
the use and benefit of the stockholders the 
value of each and every share of stock origin- 
ally held or taken by the defendants at the 
rate of $1 per share in accordance with the 
subscriptian of the defendants. 

Everts & Ewlng, Emmons & Irwin and C. 
E. Young are the attorneys for the plaintiffs. 

Plaintiffs allege that the defendants men- 
tioned (except the corporation defendant) on 
May 10, 1903, at a meeting of the dlrectois 
(the defendants in this action) passed a reso- 
lution Instructing the secietary of the corpo- 
ration (C. E. Young) to issue to each of the 
defendants 15,000 shares of the capital stock 
of the corporation, and that the act was car- 
ried out. 

The plaintiffs allege that the defendants 
never paid to the corporation anything of 
value whatever for the 15,000 shares of stock 
so transferred to each of them ; that by taking 
to themselves 15,000 shares of stock each the 
board of directors obtained an interest in and 
to the property of the corporation dispropor- 
tionate in value to that obtained by other 
stockholders who were compelled to and did 
purchase their shares of stock and pay for the 
same In cash at its par value, $1 per share. 

The plaintiffs allege that no stockholder of 
the corporation ever obtained any stock for 
less than its par value except the defendants 
named herein. After the formation of the 
corporation the directors thereof loaned to the 
corporation the aggregate sum of #13,800, for 
which the corporation gave to the directors 
its promissory note ; that at a subsequent 
meeting the directors passed a resolution 
under and by virtue of which the directors 
distributed to themselves in lieu of moneys 
due to them under the promissory note all of 
the remaining treasury stock, except about 
8,000 shares, which stock so distributed to 
themselves aggregated about 38,000 shares of 
stock. 

The plaintiffs allege that the board of direc- 
tors was never authorized by the stockholders 
to issue such promissory note to themselves or 
to disttibute the shares of stock to themselves 
in lieu of money due to them under the prom- 
issory note. — Echo. 

New Oil-Burner Ship Launched. 

The oil-burning steamboat Shasta launched 
at Hoquiam shipyard will be the largest 
wooden oil-burner on the Pacific coast. It has 
been built for a stock company of San Fran- 
cisco men and will be managed by the E. K. 
Wood Lumber company. It is 209 feet long, 
30 feet beam and 14 feet depth of hold with a 
capacity of 900,000 feet of lumber. About 
1,500 spectators gathered to witness the. 
launching, Mrs. George Kellogg christening 
her with a bottle of water. The Shasta will 
make eleven knots an hour. After being 
fitted for sailing and loaded with lumber it 
will be taken to San Francisco for the instal- 
lation of its machinery. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



THE LATEST OIL NEWS. 



Recent Developments Which Have Made Oil One of the 
Greatest Industries in the Far West. 



Kern. 

The Copper Consolidated expects to 
perforate its well No. I today. 

At Temblor the Bishop Oil company's 
well on 13-29-20 is reported to be in oil at 
700 feet. 

The United Crude on the same sec- 
tion has just started its second well, the 
first having been completed for some 
time and producing satisfactorily. 

The dividend of $2. 25 per share just 
declared by the San Joaquin out of the 
funds received for its associated hold- 
ings, was payable on the 12th of the 
month. 

The Imperial and Thirty-three Oij 
companies of Kern River have declared 
dividends of 20 and 10 per cent respect- 
fully. These amount to $20,000 and 
1 1 0,000. 

The Transport, the new company 
backed by Midland Pacific people, lo- 
cated on a, 11-24 at Sunset, has just 
completed its first well, getting oil at 
about 900 feel. 

The Lion and the Maricopa oil com- 
panies resumed the shipping of oil 
again last week. The Lion has been pro- 
ducing about 1200 barrels a month, 
which is pretty good, considering they 
pump only every second or third day. 

A new company of San Francisco capi- 
talists has j ust entered the McKittrick 
field and acquired property on 17-30-22, 
about half a mile north of the station, 
where a well is to be drilled at once. Ma- 
terial for the rig is already on the 
ground. 

Judging from the long trains that are 
coming and going over this little spur of 
the road tri-weekly, between Sunset and 
Bakersfield, and the extreme difficulty 
with which these are being moved at 
present, it looks as if a daily train would 
not only be a great accommodation, but 
has really become a necessity. 

George Reynolds and party of friends 
interested with him in the property re- 
cently purchased from the Acme, paid 
the fields a hurried visit Saturday. 
They propose resuming work in the near 
future. This is good news, for having 
so many of these fine properties closed 
down so long has had a depressing effect 
on the fields and the industry in general. 

The Associated and the Southern Pa- 
cific are doing most of the work now at 
McKittrick and large quantities of oil 
are being taken out. Work is going on 
at the Shamrock property, although the 
litigation has not been dismissed as was 
popularly reported when the combine 
resumed operations, and the Shamrock 
people insist that it will not be dismissed. 

Cy Cooper met with a serious accident 
Tuesday while at work at the refinery. 
He was working over a fuel supply tank 
when he was overcome by gas and fell. 
He was found and, picked up by C. E. 
Harness and conveyed to his quarters, 
where he recovered sufficiently to be 
about the next day, but is still feeling 
the bad results of inhaling the noxious 
gas. 

For several days the work of leveling 
ground on the hillside adjoining the 
Jewett & Blodget refinery has been go- 
ing on, preparatory to setting up several 
large distillate tanks. This, together 
with other improvements about the re- 
finery, looks as if something would 
surely be doing there soon. The reopen- 
ing of the refinery would mean much to 
all interested in the southern part of 
Sunset district particularly, and to all 
west side producers in general. 



Eighteen carloads of the pipe for the 
California Consolidated Oil Fields com- 
pany's pipe line has been received to 
date and as each train brings in from 
three to five cars of the pipe it will be 
but a short time till the entire consign- 
ment will have reached Sunset. Surely 
the doubting Thomases need no further 
proof of the early fulfillment of this 
company's promises to come to the pro- 
ducers' assistance in marketing their 
oil. 

A fine new well was brought in on the 
Teck property Friday. This is one of 
the Crocker- Woolworth purchases, for- 
merly known by the name of the Clarke- 
Bryan-Wilson. The new owners have 
cleaned out well No. 1 and put it in first- 
class condition and now at a depth of 
only 500 feet have secured this second 
well, which gives promise of becoming a 
splendid producer when the additional 
sands that are encountered in all the 
wells in that vicinity shall have been 
reached. 

E. D. Burge, superintendent of the 
Midway, of Oregon, was a visitor in 
Maricopa recently. He brings flattering 
reports of work in that section. He is 
establishing a new camp for his com- 
pany not far from the old one, but the 
new location has many advantages over 
the spot he is abondoning. This com- 
pany continues to develop in spite of the 
lack of transportation. They go on the 
plan of accumulating the oil in such 
quantities that sometime somebody will 
see a production worth going after and 
go after it. 

Frank Drader, the European oil expert 
who has been visiting this city for sev- 
eral days past, left this morning for the 
west side fields where he will spend two 
days inspecting the various properties of 
Sunset, Midway and McKittrick. Mr. 
Drader spent two days in the Kern 
River field with Manager Bowen of the 
R. H. Herron company and expressed 
his astonishment at the extent of the 
field which was the largest he has seen 
in this country. After seeing the fields 
on the west side Mr. Drader will leave 
for San Francisco and later will return to 
Europe after having seen practically all 
the large oil districts of the United 
States. 

The Sunset Diamond Oil company, 
the pioneer company to develop on the 
flat at Sunset, has two wells on the 
pump, and these are making a record 
for steady work. Superintendent T. 
Miller reports no cessation except for 
slight repairs to the machinery. A 
packer was used in well No. 1 with most 
satisfactory results, and while both are 
on the beam at present, will undoubt- 
edly be fitted up with the latest design 
packers soon, it having been proven that 
a well yields from twenty to thirty bar- 
rels more per day when improved 
packers are instituted. The Diamond'* 
oil, which is of light gravity, is being 
shipped to the Pacific Oil Transportation 
company of San Francisco, who in turn 
send it in their immense tank steamers 
to Honolulu, where it is conaumed as 
fuel on the vast sugar plantations on the 
Islands. 

F. M. Carlock, J. W. Crosland and 
Joseph Redlick, as a committee of di- 
rectors of the Superior Oil company, 
are endeavoring to make arrangements 
for giving the Santa Fe the desired 
right of way across the company's land 
for its extension through the field. The 
Superior has been almost the only com- 
pany that has made any opposition to 



the plans of the railroad and this, it is 
said, is due to a misunderstanding and 
to the fact that the route desired by the 
road will necessitate the removal of cer- 
tain buildings of the company. A few 
days ago Right of Way Agent Hender- 
son of the Santa Fe was in the city in 
conference with representatives of the 
company and it is believed that an ad- 
justment will be arrived at soon The 
committee will endeavor to arrange for 
granting the privilege asked by the 
railroad. 

Ph'l Rogers, a pumper employed at 
the Monte Cristo. was found dead by 
the road near Kern river with a bullet 
hole through the brain. By h's side was 
a small empty bottle marked poison and 
in h's left hand he tightly clutched a 
pistol with fur emp'.y shells. No cause 
is known for the act. The deceased 
was about forty-five years of age and a 
married man with two children, all liv- 
ing at the oil fields. 

Santa Barbara. 

The Eloitt company is waiting for the 
Standard rig which is to arrive at al- 
most any time. The site for the new 
well has been selected. 

At Port Harford the Pacific Oil and 
Transportation company is putting up a 
35,000-barrel tank. The necessary p : pe 
is on the ground which will connect the 
tank with the steamers. 

Work on th- big tank of the Union 
company is nearing completion, the 
rreccanics are puttitg on the 'op tier of 
shet iron. The pipe line is progressing 
and should be complete! short'y. 

The dri lers on the Brookshire well 
have struck the blue shale which has 
been encountered by all of the preced- 
ing successful wells. The outlook is 
fine. Well No. 1 is now supplying 
water to v rious companies. 

Wm. Logan has now assumed charge 



of the field work of the Western Union 
and is getting things gradually in first 
class working order. A number of new 
wells will be started shortly. Well No. 
17, which is down 2,050 feet, is one of 
the best on the property. 

The Pinal we'l No. 4, which was 
brought in last week, is going to prove 
one of the best wells brought in yet. 
The oil is constantly rising and the in- 
dications are that it will be flow'ng in 
day or two. Well No. 1 is now flowing, 
as is also No. 3. No. 1 is being pumped. 

Due to the fact that the first hole is 
put down by the Mulhoiland company 
on the Pezzoni ranch south of town be- 
came crooked because of alternate hard 
and soft strata, it was abandoned and a 
new well was started Sunday night. 
The first hole was down about 400 feet 
and several strata of oil sand had been 
passed through, but the depth was not 
great enough for any definite indica- 
tions. The new hole is only about fif- 
teen feet from the old one and at pre- 
sent is down about 100 feet. 

Ventura. 

Slocutn & Co. have started work on a 
new well. 

On account of recent purchases of oil 
by the Pacific Coast Oil company (Stand- 
ard) in the county, it is expected there 
will be considerable activity in the oil 
fields of the county. 

A party of San Francisco capitalists 
have purchased a piece of oil property 
of C. J. Millard and G. E. Webb, adjoin- 
ing the Kentuck wells, and will soon be- 
gin development work. 

After a shutdown of several months 
the Sulphur Mountain Oil company 
has begun operations. They have 
just completed a water well which 
was made necessary for their future 
operations, and they will immediately 
begin drilling on No. 2. 



THE NATIONA SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

Oil Well Supplies 
Drilling and 
Fishing Tools 

Fitter Cables-best in the world 

We carry In stock heavy 7fHn., 55-s-ln. and 
4^-ln. Boston Casing, In addition to all the 
standard sizes and weights. 6-ln., 8-ln. and 
10-in. Boston Drive Pipe always on hand. 

Pacific Coast Headquarters 

117 North Main Street 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Branches: 

Bakersfield and McKittrick, Cal. 



PACIFIC OIL RBPORTBR 



R. M. Boyer has secured • lose from 
the Union Oil company in Saltmarah 
canyon, and in partnership with K. O. 
McDonald and T. Arandell, of Fillmore, 
will begin sinking a well at once. The 
machinery is already on the ground. 

The Paci6c Coast Oil company is now 
taking the product of the Modello Oil 
company of Piru. Capitol Crnde, Em- 
pire, Slocum & Co., and Stltmarsh Can- 
yon, and there is talk of their replacing 
their present three-inch line with a 
four-Inch one. 

John Plauger, a former Santa Paula 
oil man, now superintendent of a com- 
pany about to begin operations in San 
Benito county, has purchased the drill- 
ing outfit of Langdell, Newmark and 
Rowan, and will move the same to San 
Benito company. 

It has been definitely decided by the 
Union Oil company to move the Union 
Well Supply company plant from this 
place to Los Angeles. The change will 
take place about the first of the coming 
year. This change is made necessary 
by reason of the general growth of busi- 
ness of the Union over the Southern 
counties. A few years ago, wnen this 
locality was practically the chief field of 
operations, the Union had its offices 
here and the volume of business done 
here reached away up into the thonsands 
of dollars each month, but since the 
field of operations has been extended it 
has been found that Los Angeles is bet- 
ter situated, as being more central as a 
base of general control for the large in- 
terests of the company. Two years ago 
the Union offices were moved to Los 
Angeles, leaving a local office under the 
management of F. C. Richardson, who 
has most capably managed the interests 
of the company here ever since. And, 
by the way, this change will remove 
from Santa Paula a young man whose 
moral and business worth has been early 
recognized by our citizens, Mr. F. C. 
Richardson, will continue this work 
for the Union in the Lot Angeles offices. 
Mr. Richardson came to Santa Paula in 
1897, securing a position as stenographer 
for the Union. His diligence and ap- 
plication to duty earned him the confi- 
dence and respect of his employers so 
that when a local manager was needed, 
Mr. Richardson was the man chosen for 
the place, and he has justified the 
responsibility put upon him. Three 
years ago the Union Oil Well Supply 
company was organized as a feeder or 
branch of the Union OH company, and 
Mr. Richardson was elected secretary of 
the new concern, which position he still 
holds. He is also personally interested 
in the California Tool company of this 
place. Mr. Richardson has always 
taken an active part in religious and re- 
form work in this town; he was at one 
time a trustee and treasurer of the Pres- 
byteriau church, and is now superin- 
tendent of the Sunday School of that 
church. In church work he will be 
badly missed, as will also his wife, and 
the latter's mother, Mrs. Wilson, both 
ladies being active in missionary work 
and other lines of activity. TheUnionUil 
Supply company will still maintain a 
supply department here under the man- 
agement of the Santa Paula HarJware 
company. — Free Press. 

Santa Maria. 

Well No. 1 of the Los Alamos Oil and 
Development company is expected to 
come in at almost any hour, as the dril 
is now believed to be down to about the 
necessary depth. 

Word has just been received from 
Santa Maria that well No. 4 of the Piua'. 
company, which is operating a short dis- 
tance from the wells of the Western 
Union Oil company, has come in acd 
that it has been spouting great volumes 
of oil from the moment the drill struck 
the oil strata. The company has been 
drilling on this well for several weeks 



past and the managers are highly elated 
over the result The gravity of the oil 
is practically identical with that of well 
No. 3 which came in several weeks ago 
and persisted in Hooding the country in 
that neighborhood before it could be 
copped. 

Wyoming. 

C. G. Andrews returned on Tuesday 
from a visit 1 1 the Green River oil fields 
in Utah. He says that the piospects in 
Uinta county are far ahead of anything 
he saw in that state and that our oil is of 
a much higher grade. 

C. A. Djrn, western representative for 
the Oil Wei Supply coxpaoy, with 
lieadqiartrrs in Salt Lake City, will 
shortly reuove bis family to this city. 
Mr. Dm has opened an office in the 
Oil Hxchange, where he will be pleased 
to serve all intending purchasers of oil 
we'l supples. 

J. H. Chanslor, who has heavy inter- 
ests in our oil fields, passed through 
Evanston on Thursday, enroute to New 
Yo k city. He says that his company 
is perfectly satisfied with the heavy 
ex e-ditnre they hive trade in our field 
and predicts that their judgment will 
more than return them dollar for dollar. 

C. O. Richardson, the oil man, was in 
the city Thursday. Mr. Richardson 
has aim :st recovered from the gun-shot 
wound wh'ch he accidentally received 
about a month ago. He has a corps of 
abl? drillers at work on his property 
near Ls Ro' and says that his drill has 
already penetrated a well-soaked oil- 
sand. 

Capitalists of the east arc commencing 
to find an interest in the Wyoming oil 
fields, and parties have visited Washing 
ton to get the titles to certain desert lai.ds 
in Wyoming. They state that easterners 
are commencing to invest money in 
largesums in the oil land of the vicinity. 
The reports in the east of Mr. Gailey, of 
Pittsburg, and others directed the atten- 
tion of easterners to the opportunities for 
investment. 

Attorney Hamm received word yes- 
terday to the effect that drillers at work 
on the property of the Kansas- Wyoming 
company in Humboldt county, Missouii 
had encountered a splendid gas well at a 
shallow depth. This concern is meet- 
ing with success in their outside oper- 
ations and it is hoped that when they 
invade Uinta county next year that their 
success will make the "natives smile." 

As assessment work proceeds in the 
Uinta county eil fields, many encourag- 
ing indications of promising territory 
are revealed. While workmen were en- 
gaged in doing assessment work near 
Aspen last week a fine allowing of pe- 
troleum was made at a depth of eighty 
feet. Word was received here this week 
that John Fitzsimmons had discovered 
oil in fair quantity on section 30, 18-20. 



All of these discoveries are looked upon 
as very encouraging by the experienced 
oil man, and already there is talk of 
many rigs goiig up next spring in these 

C. H. Jackson, field manager for the 
Dixon Oil company, one of the leading 
oil producers of the south, stepped over 
in Evanaton yesterday while on his way 
to Salt Lake City. While here he 
closed a deal with Mr. and Mrs. John G. 
Piero for 3,000 acres of prom'sing oil 
territory near Smithville, Tenu. This 
land his been held by the above named 
partifs for several yea~s, and it now ap- 
peara that they are to make a fortune 
out of the barren waste. Mr. Jakson 
examined our oil carefully and was 
greatly impressed with its high quality, 
predicting that it was only a matter of 
time until tank cars were seen going 
over the railroads from this county to 
market. 



./ant More Light Oil 

The demand for light gravity 
oil is increasing every day and 
the reports [from the south indi- 
cate that the Los Angeles, Fuller- 
to and other fields can not nearly 
su pply what is needed, although 
dr lling is being pushed very 
vigorously in all of them. At 
Fdllerton it is said that the oil is 
bringing over $1 a barrel, but the 
field Is not increasing its produc- 
tion very rapidly in spite of the 
work being done. 

A new company is being formed 
composed of Los Angeles and 
Ventura capitalists to prospect 
and exploit the hitherto unde- 
veloped lands of Ventura county, 
where the indications are excel- 
lent and where hundreds of loca- 
tions were filed during the boom. 

Some of these lands lie near the 
Kern county border and in the 
Cuyama district, where some de- 
velopment work is already being 
done. 

The demand for light oil is con- 
sidered certain to prove a great 
boon to the west side fields, 
where this is produced as soon as 
transportation is provided which 
will enable producers to get their 
product to market. It is said that 
many of the eastern fields are 
falling off in their production 
greatly and therefore the Stand- 
ard is giving more and more atten- 
tion to the California districts. 



Recent Patents. 

The following recently granted j 
relating to oil and gas are reported ex- 
pressly for the Pacific Oil Rkporibr 
by J. M. Nesbit, Patent Attorney, Park 
Buildiug, Pittsburg, Pa., from whom 
printed copies may be procured for 15 
cents each: 

Well drill, M. M. Long, Canton, III.; 
No. 741.150. 

Standing valve, W. L. Belts, Petroleum 
Center, Pa.; No. 741,217. 

Hydraulic indica'or for oil wells, F. 
W.Jones, Santa Paula, Cal„ 741,2,8. 

Casing head, C. A. Ott, Warren, Pa.; 
No. 74 I,3f4- 

Water Snpply device fcr well drilling, 
W. H. I.adley, Maricopa, Cal.; No. 742,- 
45' 

Automatic ccupling for pump-rods, 
Thomas Costello, Jr., and V. B. Post, 
Spencerville, O; No. 742,5 3. 

Deep-well pump, F. C. Kleinstiver, 
Port Huron, Mich.; No. 742/76. 



Land Frauds in Oregon. 

The inquiry of the , Federal 
Grand Jury into the matter of land 
frauds in this state resulted in the 
indictment of six persons, and the 
statement is made that false entry 
has been made on an aggregate of 
about 1,000,000 acres of land. 



U. M. THOMAS 

318 Pine Street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



OIL LANDS 

Successor to the Land De- 
partment of the 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Buy and sell oil land in 
all the proven oil belts 
of California. 



Coalinga Lands a Specialty 



■THE- 



Large! Dome, Two Sheet 
Boiler 



SAVES MONEY 



Consumes Less Fuel than any other. 

Dry Steam always assured. 

Fitted for 



Oil Well or Stationary Work 



Write for Prices 



R. H. HERRON CO. 

509 Mission Street, Sao Francisco, Cal. 




12 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTBK 



Petroleum Supply and De- 
mand. 

" The net decrease in the stocks 
of Pennsylvania and Trenton rock 
oils during September amounted 
to 138,033 barrels, or about 
4,600 barrels a day," said a 
prominent operator. " The de- 
crease during August amounted to 
249,262 barrels, which was at the 
rate of over 8,000 barrels a day. 
Since the first of the year there 
has been a decrease in the stocks 
of Pennsylvania and Buckeye oils 
of 1,881,449 barrels. Loss of stocks 
in other fields greatly increases 
this total. 

" Stocks were not large at the 
beginning of the year; on the 
contrary, there was an enormous 
decrease during 1902. At the 
close of 1902 the stocks of Penn- 
sylvnnia oil were 5,699,127 barrels 
and the Buckeye stocks were 17,- 
306,426 barrels, a total of 23,005,- 
553 barrels. The reduction of 
stocks during the year was 4,175,- 
174 barrels ; so that since the first 
of last year the production of 
Pennsylvania and Ohio oils has 
been 6,005,623 barrels less than 
the consumption. Stocks are lower 
today than they have been in ten 
years, and it can be easily seen 
that if the rapid reduction is to be 
continued there will be no stock 
at all in a very few years. 

" In the oil fields the bringing 
in of a good-sized well has become 
a rarity, the general run being 
small pumpers or "dusters," as 
dry wells are called. The new 
Kentucky fields have not turned 
out as it was hoped they would, 
and the new fields of Kansas and 
Indian Territory have not yet ar- 
rived at the stage of development 
to make them of importance in fig- 
uring total production. That the 
situation is a grave one everybody 
in tha oil business is willing to ad- 
mit, but while the Standard Oil 
company is searching everywhere 
for oil, those who control produc- 
ing wells will profit by the short- 
age. — Oil, Paint and Drug Review. 

The Plotts Process. 



One feature of this method is to 
remove all of the casing except 
the smallest string from the well 
at its completion. The operator 
may even insert a string of three- 



inch tubing, perforated at the 
proper place, and leave it in, pull- 
ing everything else, and the well 
will flow much more readily than 
through a larger tube, and right 
here I will say • that California 
wells of moderate size will nearly 
all flow through a packer when 
they are young, if the water is all 
shut off. 

Leave each string of casing 
hanging on clamps, and if it should 
get hopelessly stuck, cut it before 
inserting the next. 

Let the water stand at its natu- 
ral level, and when the well is 
completed as to depth, a string of 
casing in addition to the one that 
is to remain -in the well, should 
extend at least as far as the place 
where it is desired to shut off the 
water, which place should be close 
to the oil, in order to exclude all 
the water. 

When ready to tamp, pull this 
casing up to the proper place, 
mount it on a jigger of timbers 
having a connection with the 
walking beam, giving it a vertical 
motion of several inches, or as 
much as the weight of the casing 
will admit of. This will soon work 
down loose shale or other material 
that will form a bridge. 

Have on hand a lot of sand or 
other similar material that has 
been passed through a screen hav- 
ing a mesh of about one-fourth 
inch, (a wagon load is not too 
much). Insert this sand slowly! 
between the moving casing and 
the inner one, along with a small 
stream of water. 1 

This process should take five or 
six hours, and after the sand is all 
administered, the water and mo- 
tion should be continued several 
hours more if the well is a deep 
one, to prevent the two casings 
from getting stuck together. 

To further guard against this, the 
casing should be carefully mount- 
ed and care taken to prevent any 
accident, as any considerable stop- 
page of the motion would endang- 
er the recovery of the casing) as 
well as the successful exclusion of 
the water. 

Any person is at liberty to use 
the above-described process with- 
out fear of infringement. 

WILLIAM PLOTTS. 

Subscribe for the Pacific Oil 
Reporter. 







MAY BE HAD AS FOLLOWS: 

Prom Nov, 1, 1899, to Nov. i, 1900 $6.00 

From Nov. x, igoo, to Nov. 1, tool...... 6.00 

! Prom Nov. 1, 1901, to Nov. 1, 1902... ... 5.00 




Bound Volumes 

of the 

Pacific 

Oil 

Reporter 




These volumes are strongly and 
artistically bound, and contain 
the only full and correct informa- 
tion as to the development of the 
j oil industry on the Pacific coast. 




Editorial and Publishing Office 
318 Pine Street 
1 San Francisco, - Cal. 









THE 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



is the only 
OIL JOURNAL 
Published on the 
Pacific Coast. 

It gives full, fresh and authentic oil news from 
all tbe oil districts, new and old. It exposes 
fraudulent oil companies. It gives the latest 
information on oil stocks and dividends. It 
describes the latest method of drilling wells, 
pumping, piping and storing oil; use of oil for 
road making, etc. 

It is the only paper which advocates the belief 
that California's refined asphalt is the equal 
of Trinidad asphalt for paving and other pur- 
poses, and is in every way superior to bitumi- 
nous rock, the use of which has given San 
Francisco, Oakland and other California cities 
so many poor streets. 

The subscription price is $2.50 a year. If you 
are interested in any way in California oil, cut 
out the following coupon, fill in the blank lines, 
and send it, accompanied by check, money 
order or express order to the 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine St. San Francisco 



for- 



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318 Pine Street, San Francisco. 

Please enter my subscription to the Pacific Orr, Rsportbr 

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ANNOUNCEMENT 



9\ 

m 
m 



On January first, 1904, the PACIFIC OIL REPORTER jg 

will issue a Special New Year's Edition, covering the !J} 

progress made in all of the California oil fields during <¥> 

the year 1903, and the outlook for the coming year, -Jj 

together with reliable figures on the output, etc. /{j 

This edition will be superbly illustrated and will W 

contain articles by those most prominent in the oil JJ{ 

industry. From 25,000 to 30,000 copies will be circu= ji 

m 
lated. Secure your advertising space at once, as it is W 

Q\ 

already being rapidly taken. JJ} 

m 



I< 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



Dominion Oil Co. Winds up 
Affairs. 



The Dominion Oil company of Chat- 
hnui, Ontario, has gone the way of nu- 
merous other "enterprises" of the same 
sort, and passed cut of existence, with a 
large number of deluded stockholders 
left behind to do the mourning. It was 
organized at the time of the oil excite- 
ment in Ra'eigh last January, and its 
glowiug advertisements were scattered 
broadcast over Canada, England and 
the United States. Stories of big oil 
strikes were presented in an alluring 
way, and upon the strength of them, 
people were induced to take stock in a 
company which, it s now admitted, is 
practical}- without any essets. 

At a meeting of sharehclders, held 
early in the month, the promoters of the 
company were accused of fraud, and it 
was decided to wind up its affairs. The 
subscribers to the stork learned too late 
that the company was formed upon de- 
ceit, and had been doing business on a 
false basis. Another co*rp ny became 
inTolved in the purchase of the shares, 
but the present officers discla'med all 
knowledge of it- affairs when they as- 
sumed office, and declared that the 
managemert had been practically 
dumped upon them. Nearly 400.000 
shares of stocks were represented at th"s 
meeting and and tte following motion 
was adopted. 

"Resolved, That in view of the pros- 
pectus going about, published by the 
Colonial Securities company, represent- 
ing itself as the fiscal agents of the Do- 
minion Oil company, Limited, we, the 
shareholders of the company, repudiate 
the said prospectus and contents thereof, 
and state for the benefit of the public 
that the prospectus is untrue, and that 
the substance of this resolution be re- 
ported in the Monetary Times, Toronto; 
the Times, London, England, and the 
New York Herald.'' 

The oil promo'or is not exclusively a 
Yankee production. He is known 
abroad as well as in Canada and the 
United States. 



California Stock and Oil 
Exchange. 

The following were the stock sales in 
the California Stock and Oil Exchange 
in the formal sessions held for the week 
ending Wednesday, November nth. 

ASSOCIATED OIL CO. 

I.oooat 21 $ j 10 00 

CALIFORNIA STANDARD. 

400 at 10 4000 

CARIBOO. 

300 at 105 31500 

FULTON. 

5Dat 450 22500 

HANFORD. 

I at 131 00 (S 90) 131 00 

1 at 132 00 (S 90) 132 00 

5 at 135 00 (S 70) 67500 

HOME OIL. 

looat 90 (S 30) 9000 

100 at 92VJ (S 90) 92 50 

; at 92)4 1,133 12 

tooat 9J (B 5) 9500 

looat 95 ( B .0) 9500 

asoat 95 23750 

500 at 1 00 (B 9^1 50000 

INDEPENDENCE. 

1,000 at 17 17000 

JUNCTION. 

Sooat 19 9500 

KERN. 

50 at 500 25000 

MONARCH. 

looat 50 5000 

300 at 49 14700 

MONTE CRISTO. 

icoat 85 S5 00 

OCCIDENTAL OIX. 

4,125 at is 741 50 

'500 at 18 (Bi^ 27000 

500 at 19 (B 30) g5 00 



SOVEREIGN. 

looat 38 J8 00 

STERLING. 

loat 275 55 co 

SUPERIOR. 
S.85oat c6 531 00 



613 Market St., San Francisco. 



•25 
.80 
.11 



23,277 Shares Amount I6.S79.62 

FISHER R. THEATRE CO. 

100 at 2 23(S93) 22500 

NORTH SHORE R. R. CO. 
105 at 600 63000 

205 Shares Amount, J855 

The monthly record of sales since 
January I, 1903, is as follows: 

Shares. Va'ue. 

Januarv 267,019 $255,202 

February 3">443 219.358 

March 199,908 151,982 

April 236,26s 115,571 

May 401,454 154.386 

June 154.720 117,928 

July 74,594 71,890 

Vugust 181,478 119,231 

September 146, 123 74.455 

Stock Quotations. 

Following are the latest quotations for 
stocks of oil companies listed on the Cal- 
ifornia Stock and Oil Exchange: 

Oil Stocks. Bid. Asked. 

Alma 1.35 

Apollo. _ 42 

Asso. Oil Co Stk. Tr. 

Certificates 

Aztec 75 

Bav City 

Bear Flag 

California Standard 

Caribou 

Central Point Con 65 

Chicago Crude .19 

Clairemont .la 

Esperanza 

Fauna 

Four ,67 

Fulton 437K 

Giant 

Hanford 133.03 13900 

Home 9;'- 97 1 , 

Homestake 

Imperial ..„ 

Independence 16 .17 

Junction „ 18 2 

Rem 500 5 12 Ja 

Kern River 1 ,o> 13. CO 

Lion .04 

Monarch of Arizona ... ,48 

Maricopa ?-' ; 

McKittrick ,30' 

Monte Cristo .87 

Nevada 45 

Occidental of West Va .18 10 

Oil City Petroleum 27 .2S 

Peerless 14.25 

Petroleum Center 

Piedmont 

Pittsburg .20 

Reed Crude 

S.F.& McKittrick.... 2.75 

San Joaquin O. & D 

Senator .75 

Shamrock 

Sovereign 37 

Sterling 2.90 

Superior .04 

Thirty -three 

Toltec 21 

Twenty- eight 3.S0 4 30 

Union 

United Petroleum 

West Shore 2.0 

Western Petroleum 

Wolverine 25 45 



1. 05 

.20 

160 

.32 



2,000 at 19 (B 60). 



M 



Oil Companies 

WE 

DO 

JOB 

PRINTING 

Pacific Oil Reporter 

818 Pine Street 



4 ■*. 

Santa Fe 

% w 



ALL THE WAY 

CHICAGO 
In 3 Days 



Trains leave Union Feny Depot, San Fran- 
cisco, as follows: 

7AA A. M.— *BAKERSFIRLD LOCAJL,;Dne 
•-ill Stockton 10:40 a. m., Fresno 2:40 p. m., 
• uw Bakersfield 7:15 p. m. Stops at all points 
In San Joaquin Valley. Corresponding 
train arrives 855 a- m - 
a 4A A - M.— g'THK CALIFORNIA LIMIT- 
•Till ED;" Due Stockton 12:01 p. m., Fresno 
7»vw y70 p m t Bakersfield 6:00 p. m., Kansas 
City 3rd day 2:35 a. m., Chicago 3rd day 
2:15 p. m. Palace Sleepers and Dining 
Car through to Chicago. No second class 
tickets honored on this train. Corres- 
ponding train arrives °i 1 : »o p. m. 
a * a A. M.-*YAIXBY LIMITED ; Due 
V*lW Stockton 12:01 p. m.. Fresno 3:20 p. m 
7»W Bakersfield 6:00 p. m. The fastest train 
in the Valley. Carries Composite and 
Reclining Chair Car. No second class 
tickets honored on this train. Corres- 
ponding train arrives 11:10 p. m. 
4n A p M.— 'STOCKTON LOCAL: Due 
•Itll Stockton 7:10 p. m. Corresponding train 
•*" arrives 11:10 a. m. 
8aa P. M-«OYERLAND EXPRESS; Due 
'llll Stockton 11:15 P- m., Fresno 3:15 a. m. 
• ww Bakersfield 7:35 a. m , Kansas City 4th 
day 7:00 a. m. ( Chicago 4th day 8:47 p. m. 
Palace and Tourist Sleepers and free Re- 
clining Chair Cars through to Chicago. 
Also Palace Sleeper which cuts oat at 
Fresno. Corresponding train arrives 
6:2s, p. m. 
• Daily I Mondays and Thursdays 

Tuesdays and Fridays. 
Personally Conducted Parties for Kansas 
City, Chicago and East leave on Overland Express 
Monday, Thursday and Saturday at 8:00 p. m. 
Ticket Offices, 641 Market Street and In Ferry 
Depot, San Francisco; and 1112 Broadway 
Oakland. 



UNION 
PACIFIC 

Suggests 

Speed 
and 
Comfort 

S. F. Booth, Gen. Agent. 

1 .Montgomery St., S F. 
Phone. Exchange 300. 



Have You Securities 

that pay no dividends and yon want 
some that do? If you want to buy, sell 
or exchange investment stocks, or if you 
want gilt-edge shares in operating com- 
panies, address the Debenture Surety 
Company, Rialto Bldg., San Francisco, 
which also incorporates, finances and 
operates good enterprises. 



AMERICAN CONSOLIDATED 
Oil Company 

A. B. Butler, J. A. Chanslop, 

President Vice President 



13.750 shares of stock for sale at 
S cents per share — par value $1.00 



P. W. SPAULD1NG 

ATTOR N LY- AT-LA W 

Evanston - Wyoming 



TO THE EAST 



SDNSET RODTE 

Means a Trip Taken 

IN COMFORT 

Oiled Track=-No Dust 
Oil-Burning Engines 
No Cinders 
No Frost— No Snow 

SDNSET LIMITED 

San Francisco to New Orleans 

EVEBY DAY 

Dining car, meals a la carte 

Observation Car 

Vestibuled Pullman Sleepers 
Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, 

El Paso, San Antonio, 

Houston, Beaumont and 

Texas Oil Fields. 



Southern Pacific 



W. A. BROPHY, 

914 mutual Savings Bank Bldj£., 

708 Market St., San Francisco. 
Telephone, Green 816. 



Petrolenm Lands Examined and Re- 
ported on in all Parts of the United 
States. California a Specialty. 



Companies Incorporated 

under the lienient laws of 
ARIZONA 

which has the broadest laws of any state. 
Companies can be organized to do business any 
where No personal liability. No limit on cftpl 
talixation. No State examination of books. No 
franchise tax. Stock can be made non-assessable 
and can be issued for services. 

Write for information and blanks to 
HUGH M. CREIGHTON & CO. 
Phoenix, Arizona . 



Stock, Bold and Iiresuieit Syndicate 

(Incorporated) 
Money Loaned on Stocks. 

Listed and Unlisted Oil and Mining Stock! 
R. L. CHENET, Secretary 
514-515 E xam i n er Building 

San Francisco, California 

Notice to Creditors. 



Estate of William B. Winn, deceased. 

Notice is hereby given by the under- 
signed, executrix of the estate of William 
B. Winn, deceased, to the creditors of, 
and all persons having claims against, 
the said deceased, to exhibit them, with 
the necessary vouchers, within four 
months after the first publication of this 
notice to the said executrix at the office 
of William H. Waste, attomey-at-law, 
906 Broadway, Oakland, Cal , which said 
office the undersigned selects as her 
place of business in all matters connected 
with the said estate of William B. Winn, 
deceased. 

MARIA ROSA WINN, 
Executrix of the last will and testament 
of Wiliani B. Winn, deceased. 

Dated Oakland, September aS, 1903. 

William H. Waste, attornery for 
estate, Oakland, Cal. 



J. S. EWEN 

STOCKBROKBR 

318 PINE STREET, Room 5 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Member California Stock and Oil Ex- 
change, and San Francisco and Tonopah 
Mining Fxchange. 

Tblefhosk Mais ijjj. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



K a 



Vol. 5. No. 3 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 21. iqo3- 



Prick,. Tkn Crnts. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Ea 



Publl.hed Waakljr 
The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coaul 
By California PatroUaaj Mlnera' Aaaoclatloo 



MRS. MARIA ROSA WINN, Proprietor. 

E. S. EASTMAN, 
Editor and Busincu Manager 

OpriCS AND KDITORIAL ROOMS 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco, California 

Telephone, Bnah 176. 



TERMS 
On Tkak USO 

SIX MOKTMS I SO 

T^BBE MOUTHS I OO 

SltOLK COPIKS. IOC 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 



Monxt should be sent by Postal Order, Draft jr RejrUtered 
Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil Reporter, 318 Pine street, San 
Francisco, rooms Jija-Jj. Communications must be accompanied by 
writer's name and address, not necessarily Tor publication, but 
as a truarantee of (rood faith. 



Entered in the Postoffice at San Francisco, California, is second- 
class matter. 



MAKES MILLIONS RAISING PRICE. 



With a boost of half a cent a gallon in the 
price of kerosene oil last week, which makes 
an advance of 2 cents a gallon in less than a 
month, statisticians have done some figuring, 
the figures being based on an annual output 
of 1,500,000,000 gallons, with this result: 

The latest squeeze means $7,500,000 added 
annual profits for the trust. 

This month's squeeze means $30,000,000 
added annual profits. 

John D. Rockefeller is said to get 65 per 
cent of the total profits, and 2 cents advance 
will add $19,500,000 to his bank roll by the 
end of the year. 

The consumer will pay 16 cents a gallon for 
kerosene at retail, with a prospect of having 
this increased when Rockefeller gives the 
word. Rockefeller says that the natural sup- 
ply of Pennsylvania oil is being exhausted. 

CALIFORNIA MINERS' ASSOCIA= 
TION. 



sibllity of higher prices in fight there is a 
tendency on the part of land holders in Cali- 
fornia to increase their output to its fullest 
capacity, thereby keeping down the price by 
over-production, and, when the higher prices 
do come, their property will have been ex- 
hausted. 



The Alaska Field. 



A complete Standard drilling rig was 
shipped last Monday by the Union Oil Tool 
company of Los Angeles to the Douglas Lacy 
Oil company to be used in developing their 
property in the Kayak Oil district, Alaska 
Glowing reports come from this field and the 
men intrusted there, together with the suc- 
cess already attained, would indicate there 
will be something doing by early spring. Al- 
ready there are twenty rigs at work and two 
fine wells have been brought in at a shallow 
depth (one 200 and the other 365 feet) which 
are flowing and gassing. Among those shown 
as having oil property there is the Cudahey 
people, Chanslor & Canfield, J. B. Treadwell, 
Viggc-Grandel company of Vancouver, Doug- 
las, Lacey & Co., New York, and many others 
prominent as pioneer oil operators. 



Attention is called to the able article, 1 he 
Oil Industry in California, read by Dr. C. T. 
Deane, secretary of the California Petroleum 
Miners' Association, before the California 
Miners' Association, assembled in San Francisco 
this week, in which he shows the remarkable 
growth of the oil industry in California and 
rating California next to Southern Russia as 
the greatest oil field in the world. He pre- 
dicts specific improvements along the line of 
supplanting coal by the use of oil. 

KEEP DOWN THE PRODUCTION. 



The placing of oil wells close to lines, and 
but 200 to 300 feet apart as practiced in some 
districts in this state is likely to cause a rapid 
decline in the production within the next two 
or three years, while the placing of several 
wells on every acre of land will lead to a 
steady decline of the property from the scarf. 
In Pennsylvania one well to every five acres 
was deemed sufficient, and yet the wells 
would not produce always as is shown by the 
rapid falling off in that state, and the several 
wells drilled between the old ones have, in 
most cases, proven that the oil has been com- 
pletely extracted from the sand. With a pos- 



Standard at Point Hanford. 



Shipments by steamer are being made regu- 
larly from the Alcatraz landing of oil pumped 
over the mountains from the Los Alamos dis- 
trict. That the Standard Oil company is look- 
ing to Santa Barbara county field for its high 
gravity oil is evident from the fact that it is 
constructing a large reservoir and tanks at 
Port Hanford from which to load ships. 

The Standard Oil company is connecting an 
eight-inch pipe from a tank located about 400 
yards from the wharf at Port Harford for the 
purpose of conveying oil from the cars to the 
cistern and thence to the oil steamers. The 
company will run oil from the cars to a large 
cistern from which it will be pumped into a 
tank to be constructed at an early date. The 
tank will be built about 200 feet above the 
cistern, and by this method the pressure will 
be sufficient to force the oil from the tank to 
the ships that come into port. The oil indus- 
try is increasing to a considerable degree. 



Good For Wyoming. 



The Boston Journal for Investors says: 
"When it comes to oil, Wyoming certainly 
bids fair to illuminate and lubricate the works 
of man for generations. The eighteen oil 
fields known in this state present a greater 
variety of product than any similar known 
area, as it varies from the highest grade of 
lubricating oils without a trace of illuminating 
constituents to an equally high-grade of 
illuminating oil totally free from lubricants 
and with a range of intermediate oils and 
products that is a revelation to oil men. The 
development of these fields will be a gigantic 
task, as each present conditions of formation 
and depth, peculiar to itself, and It is only 
by a careful study of each, with an equally 
carefuly location of the wells and accurate 
logs of each well drilled, that success will 
crown the old man's efforts in Wyoming.' 



Gas From Fir Trees. 

Discovery of a new gas which can compete 
with any coal gas for Illuminating purposes, 
the detection of processes by which a new 
turpentine of limitless quantity and of prop- 
erties permitting the general use in the manu- 
factures and the arts, can be produced from a 
material formerly thought worthless, and the 
solution of the problem of utilizing the by- 
products of the great Douglas fir forests of 
which cover thousands of square miles of the 
Pacific northwest, is announced by Prof. 
George P. Frankforter, dean of the school of 
chemistry of the University of Minnesota. 

The Douglas fir is one of the best of the 
western timber trees, and is much sought for 
building purposes. Its lower portions are 
filled with a resinous pitch, and the portions 
containing the pitch deposit have been value- 
less for lumber because of the impossibility of 
forcing the saws through the pitch-soaked 
fibers of the log. For this reason the lumber- 
men have cut trees, frequently eight to ten 
feet in diameter, at a height of twenty feet 
from the ground. This left the pitch-soaked 
stump standing to be burned or allowed to rot 
away. 

Announcing the results of his discoveries, 
Professor Frankforter said: 

It has long been known that the pitch in 
the abandoned stumps had a commercial 
value, but means of extracting it have not 
been at hand. It was to provide these means 
that I spent months experimenting. 

I have been astounded to find, by exact 
scientific methods, that 40 per cent of the 
abandoned stumps is valuable pitch. This 
pitch properly treated produces a turpentine 
inestimably superior to that obtained from the 
touthern forests, the supply of which Is 
decreasing year by year. 

To give tersely the results, I will say that 
each stump contains 40 per cent of its bulk in 
pitch. It contains five or six cords of wood. 
Of the pitch in the stump 20 per cent can 
easily be resolved into turpentine, 30 per cent 
into tar oil, and 50 per cent into common tar. 
The tar is an excellent product and can find 
ready sale. The minor product is pyrolign- 
eous acid, containing acetic acid. 

All the products of the fir stumps can be 
removed by what is technically known as 
destructive distillation. 

One of the most marvelous features is that 
during the distillation process the fir gives out 
a gas of strong heating and illuminating 
powers, sufficient to maintain the process and 
furnish the means of extracting the products 
desired for commercial purposes. The dis- 
tillation pays for Itself and leaves the products 
of the pitch practically clear profit. 

After all the products have been extracted 
— turpentine, tar oil, tar, acids, gas — there is 
still left a charcoal, the superior of which is 
hard to find. The wonderful value of these 
stumps may be summed up in the single fact 
that not a shread is without actual commercial 
use. 

Regarding the gas given off, it is a strong 
illuminant, and without reduction operations 
carried on on a large scale it would be pro- 
uced in volume sufficient to conduct exten- 
sive gas lighting operations. — Paint, Oil and 
Drug Review. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



<K>00000<>0<X><KMK>000<>00000<>000<»00<>0000<XK>00<><>00<)000000«00<>0<HK)<><)<» 

The California Oil Industry. 

5 By Dr. C. T. Deane, Secretary California Petroleum 
| Miners' Association.—Bulletin No; 4. jjj 

0OO0OO0OOO0O0«O<>O<)O0<XKHX>0OO<>0O0O0O<»0OO0OO<K»0<X>0OO0O<>0<><H><>O<><>OC0«<H^ 

the time. There have been some fields dis- 



Me. President and Gentlemen: 

When I appeared before you two years ago 
I prophesied a very large increase in the con- 
sumption of crude oil. In 1900 we consumed 
4,000,000 barrels, 1901, 8,000,000 barrels. 
When I read my paper here last year I said 
we would use 12,000,000 barrels and I was 
over a ml'lion and a half barrels short, as the 
real figures were 13,692,514 and I estimated 
for this year, 1903, 20.000,000, it will be over 
23,000,000. I can now see no reason why in 
1904 we should not consume 30,000,000 bar- 
rels. My reasons for this increase in con- 
sumption are as follows: The railroads are al- 
most ready with tankage and changing loco- 
motives to use oil exclusively, there are over 
150 marine boilers using oil and there is an 
average of two permits a week granted by 
the treasury department. As a business pro 
position all vessels will have to use liquid 
fuel, as competition will compel them to do 
so, no company can afford to pay $t,ooo for 
fuel when their competitors pay $500, and 
that's just where they are. The cost of fuel 
for the round trip between San Francisco and 
the Orient can be cut in half by the use of 
oil. The difference between what the Pacific 
Mall Steamship company pays for coal and 
the cost, if they should substitute oil, would 
make a very handsome dividend to their stock- 
holders. Why would it not be a good busi 
ness proposition to have a supply of oil in the 
Straits of Magellan for the use of steamers 
between the Atlantic and Pacific cceans. I 
am sure this will eventually be done. 

Another very large increase in 1904 will be 
road sprinkling. This mode of making "good 
roads" is so much more economical, quicker 
and more permanent, that it is no longer an 
experiment, and all the counties in California 
and all suburban cities are now using, or get- 
ting ready to use oil. Another and recent 
application for the use of crude oil is sprink- 
ling the levees; oiled levees not only pre- 
serves them from mud and dust, but also from 
all vermin in the form of squirrel and gopher 
holes, which sometimes become very serious 
during the rainy season. It is estimated that 
the annual cost of keeping the state levees in 
repair can be reduced over 33 per cent by 
using oil, well sprinkled over them, not only 
on the top, but also where the water comes 
in contact with them, the oil having the 
effect of preventing washing. 

The manufacture of kerosene from Cali- 
fornia oil is no longer a laboratory process, 
but a number of refineries In the state are 
making it successfully, notably the great 
Standard refinery at Point Richmond on the 
bay of San Francisco. 

It might be profitable here to discuss Cali- 
fornia's future position in the world's output 
of oil. It Is well known that the Eastern 
fields, Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, 
Indiana and the other producing states are 
lessening their production very materially 
from year to year, so much so, that the price 
of oil Is rapidly mounting from week to week. 
There has not been for ten years such a 
small amount in storage as there is today and 
this while the consumption is increasing all 



covered in Texas and Louisiana, but experts 
doubt their permanency as large producers. 

There are two great oil fields in the world, 
Baku in Russia and the Kern River field In 
California. We have several other good oil 
fields in this state, Sunset, Midway, McKlt- 
trick, Coalinga, Fullerton, Santa Maria, and 
several districts in Los Angeles county, but 
on this occasion I desire simply to confine my 
remarks to a comparison of the two greatest 



forty refineries continually at work and 
others being established they certainly are 
doing the things ignorant outsiders say they 
cannot do. The superintedent of a large re- 
finery tells me he is making as good kerosene 
from California oil as any eastern refinery, 
and the Standard Oil company has certainly 
not spent millions of dollars in pipe lines and 
refineries, if they had no use for them. 
Therefore, I say that inside of five years the 
great oil fields of the world will be Baku and 
California. The time is not very far off when 
we will be exporting kerosene to the Atlantic 
states instead of Importing it from there. The 
only danger I see in the future of the fuel oil 
problem is, that our crude will be too valuable 
to burn, until the kerosene and lubricant 
properties are first abstracted. Last year 
California was the second state in the Union 
in the production of oil and I imagine that 
she will stand No. 1 in 1903. 




Dr. C. T. Deane. 



oil fields, in my estimation, in the world to- 
day. 

In Kern River we have over 4,000 acres of 
absolutely proven land, with oil sand running 
from 100 to 600 feet thick. More than half 
the amount of oil produced so far, for the past 
three years, has come from there, and the only 
limit of production is the number of wells. 
While in Baku the wells deteriorate about 
10 per cent a year; those oil men best in- 
formed, contend that the Kern River wells 
are producing more oil at the present time, 
than the same wells pumped two years ago. 
Of course there is a limit to this, but there is 
no doubt that experience will show that our 
heavy oils will come to the surface slower and 
therefore last longer than they do at Baku. 
It is also a mistake to say that the asphaltum- 
base California oil cannot be refined for kero- 
sene, lubricants, and indeed any other thing 
that the eastern oil produces, for with nearly 



Probably a better idea of the cost of produc- 
ing oil in Baku and Kern River can be had 
by quoting from our Consul, James C. Cham- 
bers, to our government; in May last he says: 
"The cost of drilling wells in Baku is over 
$30,000. This will seem an impossible figure 
to American producers who have not followed 
the reports of this consulate for some years, 
or who know nothing about the drilling 
methods at Baku, but the explanation makes 
it seem a reasonable estimate. To start with, 
the Baku man's machinery and rig ready for 
drilling costs much more than the average 
American well completed; then comes the 
expense for pipe, which is insignificant in the 
United States. In the Baku fields, to get to 
a depth of 1,500 feet, they start with not less 
than a 26-inch hole, and In deeper territory 
with even larger holes, up to 32 Iches in 
diameter. The pipe used is J4-Inch 
iron riveted, 4-foot joints, which are joined by 



riveting. They drill ahead of the pipe and 
then drive It, and they continue driving the 
pipe until it collapses or for some reason will 
go no farther; then they start another string 
of a diameter which will go Inside the first, 
generally two Inches less, and when this can 
no longer be driven, then another string 
inside It, and so on nntil they strike the oil. 
In deep wells, there is sometimes more than 
$10,000 worth of pipe. Then the cost of drill- 
ing (contract) is very great as the contract is 
generally madeiat about $5 per foot up to 700 
feet, and the price increasing about 75 cents 
per foot for the next 70 feet, $1.50 for the 
next 70 feet, and so on till after 900 feet the 
price Is about $7.50 per foot. Thus, a 1,500- 
foot well vill cost nearly $10,000 for drilling. 
And whea the oil is struck the well is by no 
means finished, for then comes the process 
which is called "exploitation", really meaning 
cleaning out the sand until the well com- 
mences flowing or yielding nearly pure oil by 
pumping. This work lasts sometimes months, 
and generally not less than two or three 
months, and adds materially to the cost of the 
well." 

Wells can be drilled in the Kern River dis- 
trict for $3,000 apiece and can be put on the 
pump for less than $4,000. I saw a contract 
a few weeks ago to put down twelve wells, 
with pipe line to railroad, and complete in 
every detail for pumping, for $75,000, and we 
must assume that the contractor was making 
some money. The wells in the Kern River 
district are about 1,000 feet in depth and they 
will average over 100 barrels a day each, but 
the experience is that they do better after the 
first year. The amount of oil produced this 
year in that district will be over 14,000,000 
barrels ; there is tankage for the storage of 
over $7,000,000 barrels. 

The great Standard pipe line is working 
better than the most sanguine supposed 
would be the case. Tney are handling from 
10,000 to 15,000 barrels a day (this is not offi- 
cial). It would not be surprising If a second 
pipe line were built ; such a project is being 
considered. 

At the Richmond refinery they are making 
large quantities of coke and the demand is 
greater than the supply. This coke sells for 
about $7,00 a ton in carload lots. For domes- 
tic purposes this coke is preferable to coal. 

There Is no first-class land for sale in the 
Kern River district, but good oil land can be 
procured in several of the other districts for 
from $1,000 to $2,000 per acre, and can be 
leased on a 20 to 25 per cent royalty. On 
proven lands owners prefer royalties to sell- 
ing, as they eventually get more money and at 
the same time retain title. There is one large 
firm who absolutely decline to sell at any 
price, but are very anxious to lease on the 
above royalties. In the Atlantic states nearly 
all oil lands are worked in this wey ; also in 
Russia the government never sells oil land, but 
leases on either oil or money royalty. 

The importation of coal is becoming more 
difficult from year to year, to owners of coal 
properties. They begin to see the " writing 
on the wall " and are gradually abandoning 
this market as " no good." When we take 
into consideration the immense displacement 
of coal by the substitution last year of over 
13,000,000 barrels of oil and the present year 
of over 23,000,000, it Is not astonishing that 
they are becoming disheartened. But as 
about all the coal used in this state comes from 
outside Its limits, and that our local railroads, 
steamers and manufactories are getting a bet- 
ter fuel at fifty per cent less cost, why I sup- 



PACIFIC OIL RBPORTBR 

pose we will have to philosophically try and 
stand it. It is only a question of time when 
the coal Importations of this pott will be sokly 
for domestic purposes, for as I said above, all 
marine boilers will be compelled to use oil for 
self protection. As far as the question of 
safety is concerned, the best answer to that Is, 
that for the past four years numbers of ferry 
boats, coast and deep sea vessels have been 
using oil without a single accident, while the 
boat was In commission. The only accident 
that has occurred was on the steamer Progreso, 
which was being fitted up as an oil burner 
and the oil tank was filled with a high gravity 
oil, while open forges were working all over 
the ship, and it is supposed that the gas from 
this tank came In contact with one of these 
open fires and caused an explosion. While 
the loss of life resulting from this accident was 
most unfortunate, it taught a lesson which will 
not easily be forgotten and such carelessness 
will hardly ever occur again. 

Mr. J. W. Harrison, the coal expert, fur- 
nishes me the following figures : 

Arrival of coal by water from January I, 1903 to No- 
vember I, 1903. 

January 59,546 tons 

February 77,797 " 

March 76.604 " 

April 76,961 " 

May 48,786 " 

June 77,043 " 

July 93,224 " 

August 125,976 " 

September 113,946 " 

October 123,823 " 

Total 873 706 " 

The above is about 165,000 tons less than 
for the same period last year. At $6.25 per 
ton this shows that we retained over a mil- 
lion dollars in the state which would other- 
wise have gone abroad. 

This oil subject is the one, of greatest im- 
portance to our beautiful state, as an eco- 
nomic factor in its development, it surpasses 
any other. If California can become the fuel 
depot of 'even the Pacific Coast there is no 
limit to our wildest imaginings as to our future, 
but this is too large a question to tag onto the 
end of a paper far too long already, and one 
the writer of this monograph hardly feels com- 
petent to do full justice to. 

The ghost of the " scrip oil land " thieves 
has, I believe, finally been laid. The Califor- 
nia Petroleum Miners' Association, with the 
assistance of our sister association, the Cali- 
fornia Miners' Association, and the personal 
efforts of your worthy president, Senator Bel- 
shaw, has fully convinced them that any 
future effort in that direction will be futile. 
They have been beaten, as they deserve to be, 
in every court, before the Commissioner of the 
General Land Office, and by the decision of 
the highest authority, the Honorable Secretary 
of the Interior, Mr. Ethan Allen Hitchcock. 

The California Petroleum Miners' Associa- 
tion in this bulletin deals exclusively with 
the Kern River district. In future bulletins, 
which are now being prepared, we will take 
up the other great districts of the state. All 
figures in our bulletin are absolutely reliable 
as we do not intend to exaggerate conditions 
for the sake of private ownership, our facts 
are all obtained from absolutely reliable 
sources and from our own experts spread over 
all districts. 

This association exists for the benefit of the 
oil interest, without regard to location, it is 
supported by voluntary contributions and is 
entirely independent of all monopolies or any 
private Interests whatever. 

Mention this paper when writing to cur ad- 
vertisers. 



October Eastern Development 

Development operations In the principal 
petroleum-producing states continued to be 
prosecuted with unabated vigor during the 
month of October, but the results have been 
much less satisfactory than during September; 
in fact, the results have been highly discourag- 
ing, the percentage of failures to find oil hav- 
ing been larger and the average dal'y produc- 
tion of the new wells the smallest of which we 
have a record — the average having fallen be- 
low ten barrels per well. This, of course, is 
the average for the total number of wells 
completed, but the average of the producing 
wells was also very small, being only about 
twelve barrels per well, showing that the best 
that can be expected is a small pumper which, 
at the present prices, is regarded as a paying 
investment, though at prices formerly pre- 
vailing, with an average production of less 
than ten barrels per well the business would 
have been highly unprofitable, Notwith- 
standing the unsatisfactory results which have 
of late attended development operations there 
is an active inquiry lor territory, and sections 
distant from known productive areas have 
been taken under lease, so that it may be said 
that no territory is available even for wildcat 
operations. The high prices prevailing stimu- 
lates the search for oil in all sections, and the 
larger percentage ot dry holes is a result of 
pushing development work far in advance of 
defined limits. There is ever the hope, how- 
ever, that the driller may discover a new pool 
and thus enrich himself. The value of pro- 
ductive areas is, of course, steadily advancing, 
and recent sales of producing wells has shown 
by the prices paid that operators have faith 
that not only present prices will be main- 
tained, but that they will go much higher. 
There is now no hope that the production in 
the older fields can be increased, and the be- 
lief is that there will be a steady decrease. 
Consequently the attention of those interested 
in the supply of oil is directed to other sec- 
tions of the country, and the state giving the 
greater promise of becoming an important fac- 
tor in the future supply is Kansas, where ope- 
rations are increasing at a rapid rate, nearly 
two hundrld wells having been completed 
during October, and the results have been 
highly satisfactory, though reports as to the 
average production of these wells vary 
greatly. 

The number of wells completed during the 
month of October in the older producing 
states, which include New York, Pennsyl- 
vania, West Virginia, Ohio and Indiana, was 
1,645, showing an increase of thirty-three as 
compared with the number completed during 
September. Of these wells 306 were destitute 
of oil, the increase in dry holes being thirty- 
nine. The daily production of the October 
wells was 16,099 barrels, showing a decrease 
of 1,955 barrels. The average production of 
the October wells was but little more than 
nine and three-quarter barrels, and of the pro- 
ducing wells twelve barrls. This shows a de- 
crease in average production of two and one- 
eighth barrels per well. There was very little 
change in the amount of new work underway 
at the close of the month, the active search 
for oil continuing unchecked, there being 1523 
wells drilling and 687 rigs in course of con- 
struction, making the total amount of new 
work under way 2210 wells. This is a de- 
crease of only nine wells. 

In the Kansas field an increase to thirty-one 
completed wells is reported, while at the close 
of the month the amount of new work under 
way was 161 wells drilling and rigs building 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



I 



NEWS FROM TBE FIELD 



Supplied by our Regular Correspondents jj 



Wyoming Letter. 

'Evanston, Wyo., Nov. 14, 1903. 

This is beautiful weather for assessment 
work. Not quite as pleasant as July, how- 
ever. 

Jos. Acocks, while doing assessment work 
on section 30, 14-118 in the Aspen district 
owned by I. Kastor, struck oil at twenty- 
three feet. The oil is of a high grade, a. 
bottle of which is on exhibit at the Oil 
Exchange. 

Messrs. Hardia and Price of the Jager Oil 
company, arrived in Evanston last Friday 
evening from the west. They intend doing 
assessment work on theit holdings In the oil 
field here and will arrange business matters 
so as to begin drilling operations very exten- 
sively next spring. 

C. A. Dorn, manager for the Oil Well Sup- 
ply company, arrived from Fossil on Monday 
and left for Salt Lake City on business. This 
company have a branch store at Spring Val- 
ley over which this gentleman is superin- 
tendent. He will shortly return, making 
Evanston his headquarters and will occupy 
an office in the Beckwith bank building. 

R. V. Ellis, president of the Atlantic and 
Pacific Oil company, returned from Kansas 
Tuesday where he is Interested with J. C. 
Hamm in the Wyoming- Kansas Oil and Gas 
company around Humboldt. Mr. Ellis went 
on to San Francisco the same day and will re- 
turn to Evanston in about two weeks to again 
look after his large interests in this field. 

John Fitzsimmons has returned from the 
oil field, having completed his contracts for 
assessment work. He reports having struck 
an excellent showing of oil last week on sec- 
tion 30, 18-120 at a depth of seventy feet, 
while doing assessment work on the holdings 
of William Lauder, also a fine showing at a 
depth of twenty feet in shale on section 
32, 18-120. These lands are located in the 
narrows down Bear river thus showing that 
we have a very extensive oil field in this sec- 
tion of Uinta county. 

"Something is doing" in the oil fields of 
Wyoming. That is the impression which 
prevails among the several hundred Omahans 
who own oil lands or are interested in the 
companies already operating in the fields. 

The cause for the expressed belief is the 
absolute silence which prevails regarding the 
Wyoming oil districts. So far as the public 
has been' concerned the past few weeks 
Wyoming might have returned to the state of 
savagery and absence of signs of civilization 
of a century ago. Appeals sent out to repre- 
sentatives of the press and of operating com- 
panies in Wyoming, for information about 
what is going on have met with no response. 
Even the Wyoming press appears actuated 
by the same spirit of silence, as none of the 
papers of that state contain anything more 
than an occasional ten liner about oil develop- 
ment. Conjecture is rife in Omaha as to the 
cause of this unseemly action in the suppres- 
sion of news regarding an Important oil dis- 
trict. The common impression is that the 
Standard Oil company has passed the word 
along the line to "keep mum" about what is 
going on. This impression arises from the 
well known conditions of the Pennsylvania 
oil fields, now reaching a state of practical 



exhaustion, and from the further well known 
fact that the Standard Oil company is buying 
outputs wherever it can force down the price 
sufficiently to warrant it further profit. Its 
immense deal with the Dabney Oil company 
of California, closed last June, is a sample of 
what the Standard is doing. Observance of 
daily oil reports indicates that the company is 
still buying and will continue to buy from 
producing companies, prior to going to ex- 
pense itself to develop new fields. 

These conditions being so apparent, lead 
many Omahans to believe, possibly with good 
foundation now that the Standard is engaged 
in securing all the available oil lands it can 
and that operations are now being conducted 
in the state of Wyoming. This alone would 
account for the silence of Wyoming people, 
according to those expressing such a belief. 
Further credence is given to this belief be- 
cause of the significant replies received from 
Omaha representatives in Wyoming. All 
answers to queries are something like this: 
"Can't say anything just at the present time, 
but don't let go your stock (or land, as the 
case may be) at any price." 

The Omaha-Wyoming company controls 
the largest body of oil fillings of any company 
organized in this city. Its officers have re- 
ceived this same kind of reply to letters to its 
representatives in Wyoming. 

This company's land is yet being worked 
by the lessees with results which have been 
published from time to time in the Omaha 
Commercial. Four wells have been sunk and 
have reached the productive stage. 



Coalinga Letter. 



COAUNGA, NOV. 16, I903. 

The Southern Pacific Railroad company is 
building the largest and most is proved load- 
ing rack iu use in this field. It will have 
thirty-two spouts which will enable them to 
load a like number of cars. With its two 
55,000-barrel storage tanks at Ora station, 
connected to the large loading rack, and its 
six-inch pipe iine into the field would indicate 
that this company intends to receive con- 
siderable oil from Coalinga. 

A company by the name of the New En- 
gland-Coalinga Oil company has purchased 
the NWJ( of section 24, 19-15 from the Rhode 
Island and California Oil company. It is 
understood that development work will soon 
begin. 

The Elmore Oil company will be drilling 
within a couple of days on section 6, 20-14. 
It is now considering bids from contractors 
for drilling the well, everything else being 
ready for work to begin. 

The Elzumo Puro company has levied an- 
othai assessment of 2 cents per share at its 
meeting on the 7th inst. The company is 
under expenses of drilling its fourth well and 
fitting up a new camp. Three wells are being 
steadily pumped producing over 4,030 barrels 
per month. This amount will be Increased 
since one of the wells have been put to pump- 
ing on the beam instead of a jack. Every- 
thing about its lease looks very promising and 
in good condition with its wells in good work- 
ing order. 

Messrs. E. L. & W. S. Herring, contractors 
for oil well drilling, have returned to the 
field. The first work that they will do is to 
deepen No. 3 of the Fresno-San Francisco 
Oil company's well thirty feet into the oil 
sand. Messrs. Herring have also been 
awarded the contract for drilling well No. 3 
for the New San Francisco Crude Oil com- 
pany. Work on this well will begin imme- 



diately after the completion of deepening the 
Fresno-San Francisco well. 

Work on the first rig for the Genesee Oil 
company on section 31 is progressing rapidly 
and will be completed within another week. 
Mr. Guthries has taken the contract for drill- 
ing the well agreeing to furnish everything 
including the casing and rig. Mr. Guthries 
has also taken the contract for drilling the 
three wells of the Maine State, one' of which 
is now being drilled, another rig is under con- 
struction, and the lumber for the third is on 
the ground. 

There are very few wells in this state like 
the one of the Wabash Oil company. It 
stands unique in the list of extraordinary 
wells from the fact that it is really several 
wells in one. Last Sunday a packer was put 
in, and the well is now flowing at the rate of at 
at least 200 barrels. Between the casings 
comes up a steady flow of good water which 
is being utilized for boiler purposes and sold 
to neighboring companies, and the gas of the 
well is being used in the houses of the com- 
pany. Thus the well is producing an abun- 
dance of oil, water, and gas without any 
effort of machinery. The land on which it is 
located was within a year ago merely a located 
claim. The present company realizes the 
value of its property and will begin 'rigging 
up for another well at once. The Standard 
has contracted to take the oil, the first de- 
livery being made on the 14th inst. 

The Commercial Petroleum company is 
hauling the lumber for two additional rigs to 
be erected shortly in order to begin drilling as 
soon as No. 3 and 4 will be finished. Its No. 
2 is now being cleaned out to make it flow 
again, as it did after being finished. Thetwo 
wells of the Commercial have been producing 
at the rate of nearly 500 barrels per day. 

The Corfidence Oil company is contracting 
to have a well drilled on the SE^ of the SW# 
of section 31, near the Maine State's No. 6. 

With the approaching cold weather, the 
operators have had considerable trouble in 
reducing sediment in the oil down to the per- 
centage accepted by the Pacific Coast Oil 
company. Most of the operators on the west 
side have installed heaters to heat the oil to a 
temperature that will allow the sediment to 
settle more readily. As a good many c m- 
panies have limited storage facilities and were 
not prepared to heat the oil, the Pacific Coast 
Oil company is accepting oil of a higher per- 
centage of sediments to facilitate the shipping 
of oil from the field and thereby feleaving 
the operators. 

The scarcity of teams in this field has been 
somewhat remedied by the arrival of fourteen 
teams from McKlttrick, but in spite of this 
new addition to the number it is difficult to 
get any hauling done at short notice. The 
present activities in the field warrant re- 
numerative work for more teams. 

The Pleasant Valley Stock company had 
its well perforated on the i6th, after going to 
a depth of 1,210 feet, penetrating over sixty 
feet of good oil sand. A good sized reservoir 
has been dug for the reception of the oil as 
soon as the well Is put to producing. From 
the amount of escaping gas and the behavior 
of the well during bailing it promises to equal 
if not excel some of its neighbors. 

After considerable work the Esperanza has 
finally succeeded in cleaning out its No. 3 so 
that it is flowing at the rate of 250 barrels per 
day. This brings the daily production of the 
Esperarjza to 1,000 barrels. Work on No. 4 
has been somewhat retarded on account of 
being unable to get an underreamer, but now 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



better progress is assured and the work is 
going well. 

The Union Oil company's No. 2 well got 
into the oil sand at a depth of 900 feet. No. 
1 well has been put to pumping after flowing 
for several weeks. The oil produced on this 
lease Is of 17 gravity. 

York -Coalings has finished cleaning out its 
No. 2 and now will begin the same operation 
on No. 1. 

J. D. Pillsbury has purchased the SWtf of 
section 2, 21-15, '>'' D K southeast of the town. 

The Mercantile Crude are in the oil sand at 
1,000 feet after successfully removing the 
parted casing. Everything has been put into 
readiness, tank, pump, etc. for receiving the 
oil. By the end of the week the well will 
very likely be completed. 

The Pacific Coast Oil company are building 
boiler and pump houses at its three pumping 
stations in the field. Six-inch pipe has been 
strung to connect the Esperanza with the 
special line to the Section Seven Oil com- 
pany. 

Numerous fishing jobs have been reported 
the past week, among the unfortunates are 
the M. K. & T. losing the tools, the Blue Dia- 
mond separated its casing, Mercantile Crude 
separating its casing, Elzuma Puro losing bit, 
Esperanza losing tools. All of the above 
named are well under way again regaining 
the lost tools without much difficulty. 

Stockholders Oil company report good pro- 
gress after spudding in two weeks ago. 

R. M. D. 



Good Oil in Kansas. 

The Prairie Oil and Gas Company, the 
Standard Company in Kansas, is making 
rapid preparations to take the oil as rapidly 
as they can make the extensions and connec- 
tions to pipe lines. The producers in the 
Independence field are being taken care of 
and the line will shortly reach the Peru field. 
W. D. O'Neil, in the Derrick says: The 
official standard of oils has been arranged into 
three classifications, first, grade oil, being that 
which will regester 32 degrees or better, sec 
ond grade ranges from 27 degrees to 32 
degrees, while anything lower than 28 
degrees in specific gravity will be classed as 
third. The price now ranges at $1.30 for 
first grade, $1.10 for second grade, and 60 
cents for third grade oil. Upon this basis, the 
prices prevailing at present are: Neodesha, 
$1.30; Independence, $1 30; Chanute, $1.10; 
Cherryvale, $1.10; Peru, $1.00; Humboldt, 
60 ecnts; Bartlesville, (I. T.) $1.08; Red Fork, 
88 cents. 



Kansas Pipe Lines. 

The latest troublesome story of a line to 
pipe gas from the field where it is fonnd to 
some outside city comes via the Kansas Der- 
rick, and is to the effect that Wilson county 
gas is to feed the factories of Wichita. Frank 
B Casey, Henry Keiser and H. K. Houston, 
all of Bloomington, HI., who are interested in 
leases about Buffalo, are talking of a pipe line 
costing a million dollars which will furnish 
gas to Eldorado, Eureka, Wichita and in- 
tervening points. The cities In question talk 
very enthusiastically about granting liberal 
franchises, but Buffalo is kicklug like a bay 
steer. Her hope of commercial greatness 
from manufacturers dies the day a pipe line 
taps her field. 

Can Wilson county people prevent the 
piping away of the gas? The attorney- 
general has expressed the opinion that they 
can, declaring that the county commissioners 
have full control of highways and can prevent 
thier use for pipe lines, the supposition being 
that to buy or condemn a way over private 
property is too expensive to consider. 

But now comes W. F. Rightmire, an attorney 
of Topeka, and quotes the Kansas code on 
highways to prove that a county cannot pre- 
vent the piping away of gas. After the 
county commissioners establish a highway the 
township board takes absolute control. But 
the township has no vested rights in the 
highway, simply having its use for a highway, 
the real ownership lying in the adjacent prop- 
erty owners. 

Asked the direct question, " Can legal steps 
be taken to prevent a company from piping 
gas from a county ?" he replied: 

" No more than a producer of wheat or corn 
could be prohibited from shipping wheat or 
corn cut of the country. They are articles of 
commerce, and no state can control the com- 
merce in the same if an attempt should be 
made to market the same outside the limits of 
the state." 

The sure and safe way is for the farmer 
when leasing is to insert a clause providing 
for the canceling of the lease in case an 
attempt is made to pipe the gas from the 
county. This is a good idea for commercial 
clubs to take up, preach and help make a 
general provision of gas leases. — Journal for 
Investors. 



Gas in Wyoming. 

A natural gas discovery In the Erennlng 
basin, eleven miles west of Douglas, Wyo., 
has caused intense excitement. The strike 
was made by the La Prele Oil company, 
which now plans to pipe the gas to Douglas, 
Casper, Glenrock, Wheatland and Cheyenne 
for the lighting of those cities by natural gas. 
The flow was struck at a depth of 475 feet and 
was so great that it forced the heavy drill out 
of the well and threw gravel and dirt over the 
top of the derrick. The well has been cased 
and capped, and when the vent Is turned on 
the escaping gas creates a sound which can be 
heard for three miles. Four weeks previous 
another gas well was struck 100 feet from the 
present well. 

Oil in Michigan. 

Much excitement has been created in Delta 
county, Mich., as a result of the recent strike 
of oil at Rapid River, where for several 
months a Milwaukee company has been 
operating. Geologists have long maintained 
that the indications pointed to the existence 
of oil in that part of the country, and, although 
spasmotic attempts were made to find it for 
the last twenty years, work on a systematic 
scale was started only a comparatively short 
time ago. Now there is every reason to 
believe that the field is of consinerable extent 
and that Delta county will become an im- 
portant producer of oil. 



We manufacture the best 
lubricating oils for oil 
drillers 

KING KEYSTONE OIL CO., 

116 Front St., San Eranclsco. 



Pipe Line to Osage District. 



The installation of a pipe line In the Osage 
nation tract of the Indian territory is shortly 
to be undertaken by the Indian Territory Il- 
luminating Oil company. A line In the terri- 
tory has been badly needed, and now that 
there is some prospect of a more accessible 
market, operators are very anxious to know 
just what that portion of the field will do. 
Thus far the development has been almost 
entirely along the eastern border of the nation, 
though several wildcat wells have been 
drilled to the westward, and leases have been 
taken on large blocks lying quite distant from 
the present developed territory. The first 
well In this grant was drilled by Glenn & Co., 
in the year of 1896, and it is still pumping 
with a very good record of production. 

The subscription price of the Pacific Oil 
Rkportbr is $2.50 per year. 




We Build Galvanized Iron Tanks 

For oil, water and fuel purposes. Estimates cheerfully given on any kind of tank. 
Being situated near the Coalinga fields, we are in a position to make extremely low prices 
We have supplied nearly every galvanized iron tank now in use at the Coalinga oil fields. 

KUTNER, GOLDSTEIN CO. 

HANFORD 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



i<«k>o<><>o<>o<kk>o<k>o<><kk>oo«>oo<k)o<><>o<>o<><>o^ three cents a barrel, leaving a profit of over 



The Great Kansas Petroleum Field 

I The Remarkable Advancement of a Comparatively 
! New Oil Territory. 

0©0<>©<><X><>0<>©0<><><><>000000<>000<><>0<><>0<><>000<>0©©0^ oocooooooo* 

Chanute, Kansas, Nov. 14, i9°3- 
To Editor Pacific On. Reporter : 
Oil was not always on the Kansas market. 

There was a time, even though gas in small 

pockets had been found and utilized, and its 

existence in vast volume believed in by the 

most sanguine, when the idea of oil, had it 

been thought of seriously, would have been 

scouted by almost any Kansan. Kansas 

seemed primarily and essentially an agricult- 
ural state, barren of minerals and barren of oil 

and gas and asphaltum. But recent years and 

steady development have proven the fallacy 

of early theories, for the state is proving itself 

so rich in the materials that founded and per- 
petuate, the wealth of Pennsylvania, as to 

dazzle the eyes of the investor and put to 

shame the wildest dreams of the prospector. 

Kansas has added a field as rich and fertile in 

thousand feet of underlying tertiary wealth- 
producing as the heart of man could desire. 

It is the El Dorado of the Great West, the 

Mecca of the fortune seeker. Opportunities 

for money-making multiply with every strike, 

and Increase in valuation with every sunrise. 

Now is the golden opportunity, and the man 

who passes it by is robbing himself. 
It was in the spring and summer of 1892 

that Kansas oil first made its appearance to 

the prospector. Guffey & Galey the million- 
aire operators, gave it what was then con- 
sidered a sufficient test, wlld-cattlng this 

whole territory of southeastern Kansas with 

their drills. Hundreds of acres were leased, 

dozens of drilling rigs were brought from the 

east, and while strikes were made, they were 

spoiled in many and under estimated in 

others, a general condition of incompetence 

seeming to prevail in the work done. Guffey 

& Galey more nearly defined the trend at 

Neodesha than at any other place, and upon 

the showing made there, sold their find to the 

Standard Oil company and abandoned the 

field. 

For eight years it lay dormant except for 

the string of well around Neodesha which the 

Standard operated. A refinery was estab- 
lished there sufficient for the output and the 
Standard gradually widened its holdings, 
opening up a small field at Thayer and an- 
other at Buffalo. During all this time the na 
tives still pinned their faith to gas and be 
Ueved that time would discover it. 

Municipalities and gas companies commen- 
ced to prospect for it for light and fuel and 
even school districts sunk wells. Every well 
seemed to be successful and it was not long 
until here and there an oil well was uncapped 
and the crude mounted slowly to the top of 
the hole to run out on the ground and perme- 
ate the whole atmosphere with its odor. 
When these discoveries were noised abroad 
there came operators to inquire and before 
long men were quietly leasing again, forming 
independent companies and going into the 
business in a substantial way. East spring 
the Influx of capital was tremendous and the 
gain since has been so markedly steady and 
with such flattering results that an immense 
amount of work has been accomplished. Hun- 
dreds and hundreds of thousands of dollars 



have been spent in development and so far 
there is no reason to think that every dollar 
will not be returned many fold. The eternal 
pecking away of the drills day and night and 
the multiplying of Interests has not served to 
bring the field to a focus or limit its prospects. 
Bather it has served to widen it and lengthen 
it and provide safe investment for millions 
more. The development of the Kansas oil field 
is but in its infancy. Even the lines have not 
been established and there remain thousands 
of acres surrounded by oil wells, yet un- 
touched by the drill Capital is not idle. It is 
flowing into the channels provided by the 
prospector, but it will be years yet before the 
possibilities of the field can be approximately 
estimated or the limit of its life set. Every 
day some venturesome company, risking its 
money in one sense on a long shot, sinks a 
drill into oil sand in an altogether unlooked 
for corner and brings into the gradually widen- 
ing territory thousands of acres more of pros- 
pective oil land, upon which many other com- 
panies will operate later with almost equal 
success. Operators In the early days gave 
Chanute a little strip of territory two miles 
long by half a mile wide for its oil field, but 
today in no direction has the limit been defii- 
nltely set upon Its size. Prospecting con 
tinued steadily up the river for eight miles 
and is still going, and the same successful 
prospecting is true of the other directions, 
the percentage of dry holes (less than three 
per cent) being in no way increased by fur- 
ther development. The showing now is that 
the field will easily prove 125 miles in length 
by 50 miles wide, and we have no assurance 
whatever that this even is the limit. In 
this territory now there are over a hundred 
bona fide companies prospecting and operat- 
ing, and each one has a chance to pay divi- 
dends if properly managed. The field has 
been singularly free from wildcat companies, 
none but bona fide propositions having been 
offered the public for investment. 

The average daily production of all wells in 
this field is said to be about forty barrels each, 
although many wells have been struck that 
produce from one hundred to three hundred 
barrels daily. 

When the wells are completed, each is 
equipped with a complete pumping outfit and 
pipe-line to convey the oil to a centrally loca- 
ted field tank, from which it is gauged out to 
the Standard Oil company. 

The process of pumping the oil is very in- 
teresting. The shafts are iron tubes, five 
inches in diameter. Into this a two-inch tub- 
ing is lowered almost to the bottom, 300 to 800 
feet. The compressor supplies the air through 
a valve near the surface, sends it down the 
tube and under the long, heavy column of oil, 
which it forces through the casing into the 
tank. The wells are pumped one at a time 
and as rapidly as the field men can go from 
one well to the other and turn on the air. 

The expense in operating a fully developed 
oil field is probably the least in proportion to 
the business done of any industry known. 

If the total expense were figured on a very 
liberal basis, it would amount to less than 



one dollar on every barrel produced, even at 
the present low price. 

It is a recognized fact and certainly beyond 
dispute that investments in oil, when reason- 
ably successful, are the best there are. The 
returns are greater, surer and longer in dura- 
tion. Though the Kansas field has now been 
prospected practically but a year, and but a 
little part of it has reached the point of active 
producing and operation, many comfortable 
fortunes have been made. In every instance 
the lucky man has been one who invested a 
few hundred on the ground floor and took his 
chance with the rest. There are hundreds of 
cases in the field today, where a holding with 
a cash value of from $10,000 to $50,000 repre- 
sents an original investment of from $100 to 
$1,000. It is so remarkable that there have 
been very few losses. 

The proven oil territory in Kansas has al- 
ready assumed proportions beside which the 
limited area of the Beaumont field appears 
diminutive. 

Nearly two hundred drills are running 
night and day and the peaceful farms of the 
vicinity are-beginning to look like Pennsyl- 
vania oil regions in their palmiest days. 

Operations are carried on with such a rush 
and so little time is lost, that one must be con- 
stantly in the field and in touch with every 
company to estimate the full value and im- 
portance of the work accomplished. Data of 
today must be changed and increased to- 
morrow. 

The oil seems to He in valleys like a river 
bed, on the edges of which the wells go to 800 
feet, and from this depth to 600 or a little 
more in the center. Oil is found in one of 
three strata of sand, each stratum carrying 
in thickness from fifteen to thirty-five feet. 
Above the oil sand, the drill passes through 
gravel, sand and streaks of shale. Below is 
something like twenty-eight feet of salt water, 
underneath which lies a stratum of limestone, 
which so far has never been penetrated. 

Occasionally, oil is found in all three sands, 
and quite often in two. The formation of the 
earth here, and the nearness of the oil, makes 
drilling comparatively easy, and wells cheap. 
In fact, this Kansas field is believed to be one 
of the cheapest in the United States for the 
production of oil. The product has a specific 
gravity of from 30 to 33. It takes rank with 
the best Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Indiana 
product. 

The wells in the Kanas field produce from 
ten to one hundred and fifty barrels of oil per 
day each, according to the coarseness of the 
oil sand or rock. This rock varies in thick- 
ness from ten feet at the edges of the field to 
seventy-five at the center. 

The oil is found in a porous sandstone — 
"oil sand" — through which the oil percolates 
slowly, hence insuring permanence. The 
Kansas oil fields are a conservative, business 
proposition, not spectacular as in the case of 
Beaumont, where the oil actually existed in a 
pool — not in sand rock — which would in the 
nature of things be quickly exhausted. The 
oil sand in our fields varies in thickness from 
ten to sixty feet, and it will take from ten to 
fifteen years to pump out the product. 

Kansas oil has an asphaltum basis ranging 
from twenty-nine to thirty-four in specific 
gravity. It burns freely in a lamp without 
refining, although the flame Is rather yellow. 

K. D. WARD. 



When writing to advertisers always men- 
ion the Pacific Oil Reporter. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Section 26 Again. 

There was a wild time out in the oil fields 
io Coalings district, three weeks ago, accord- 
ing to a complaint filed by the Headlight De- 
velopment company yesterday in the superior 
court against W. P. Kerr, Scott, Blair, 
Rozalle, G. T. Thompson, E. Scott, Oscar 
Loftus. J. F. Forbes, H. M. Kerr and Cal Boyd. 

The Headlight Development company Is 
a concern in which the incorporators are J. D. 
Torreyson, T. R. Hofer and Ed. J. Walsh. Its 
agent in this matter Is Edwin C. Brown. It 
had employed men and on the SW' 4 of sec- 
tion 26, township 19 south, range 15 east, It 
had erected a fence and a tent and had the 
lumber ready to put up a substantial house. 

"While plaintiff was In actual and peace- 
able possession of said SW,' 4 of said section 
26," says the complaint in the stilted, yet in 
this case, graphic, language of legal docu- 
ments, "the defendants by force and violence 
and circumstances of terror, entered upon 
said SW# of said section 26 with horses and 
wagons, and with a number of men employed 
by siid defendants, and broke down and dug 
up a fence erected around said land by plain- 
tiff, and also tore down a tent placed thereon 
by plaintiff, and threw the fence material and 
said tent with a lot of lumber placed on said 
land by plaintiff, for a house about to be 
built thereon by plaintiff, off of said land, and 
by threats and menacing conduct turned the 
plaintiff and its agent and emplyees out of 
said land; that said defendants and their said 
employees carried and displayed pistols and 
rifles and threatened to shoot plaintiffs agent 
and employees if they interfered with or 
resisted defendant and their employees from 
making said forcible entry upon said land, 
and turning the plaintiff and its said agent 
and employees out of the possession of said 
land, and that said defendants thereby 
intimidated the plaintiffs said agent and 
employees and deterred them from holding or 
defending said plaintiff's possession of said 
land." 

Judgment is asked for $2,000 actual dam- 
ages and for punitive damages in thrice that 
sum, for possession of the land and for cost of 
suit. Frohman & Jacobs are the attorneys 
for the plaintiff. 

Acme OH Company Loses Its Lease. 



The state supreme court of California has 
handed down a decision in the case of the 
Acme Oil and Mining company against H. L. 
Williams and others, involving leasehold 
rights in the Summerland district near Santa 
Barbara, Cal., which has an Important bear- 
ing upon the oil industry throughout the 
state. It will go a long way toward effectually 
stopping wild-cattng, which evidently was 
the object the court had In view in making 
the decision. 

The important feature of the decision is the 
ruling which holds that parties obtaining 
leaseholds with royalties as a consideration 
must sink wells and do substantial develop- 
ment work during the life of the lease. The 
suit which brought forth the ruling com- 
menced in the superior court of Santa Bar- 
bara county about five years ago. 

The Acme company secured a lease, agree- 
ing to put down two wells within as many 
months, and ten more wells within a year, 
paying a royalty of 10 cents a barrel. Two 
shallow wells were put down, and royalties 
for the two months paid, after which oper- 
ations were discontinued, the company hold- 
ing it had until the end of the year on the 



contract before forfeiture could be claimed by 
Williams. 

Subsequently the drilling rigs, tanks and 
oil were sold under attachment, and Williams 
took possession of the premises, contending 
the conditions of the lease had not been ful 
filled. He then leased the land to other 
parties, who proceeded with development 
work. The Acme company brought suit for 
the recovery of the leasehold, which had also 
been sold, but lost its case In the superior 
court. This judgment has just been sus- 
tained by the supreme court, which says: 

"Covenants may be implied as well as ex- 
pressed, and In oil leases and others of that 
character, where the consideration for lease 
is solely the payment of royalties, there Is an 
implied covenant, not only that wells be sunk, 
but that oil be produced in paying quantities, 
and that the wells be diligently operated, for 
benefit of both parties to the contract." 



More Trouble Over Road Oiling. 

Stanislaus county may become involved In 
a suit for infringement of a patent in connec- 
tion with the oiling of county roads. Suit 
has been commenced against Sacramento 
county on the same ground, and the com- 
plaining company asserts that the action is a 
test case and that if the contention set up is 
decided to be valid all the counties of the 
state which have been using the road-oiling 
process will be prosecuted for damages. The 
suit was brought in a federal court. 

De Camp et al. are the complainants. The 
claim is that the application of oil to earth to 
prevent dust arising and to make hard road 
surfaces Is covered by letters patent, and that 
no one may make such application expect on 
payment of a royalty fee. 

The Sacramento district attorney told the 
board that patent law practice was a specialty. 
While he was willing to do all he could, it 
was the part of wisdom to engage a specialist 
— one who can be in attendance upon the 
court In which the case must be tried — and 
that they should at once engage such special 
counsel to see to it that no judgment is 
entered against the county without a contest. 

When the board adjourned it was well 
nerved up for the fight, and Chairman Dill 
man hastened to his office to prepare com- 
munications to be sent to all the valley coun- 
ties in the state and to the directorates of the 
two great railway lines, with a view of secur- 
ing a conference upon the subject and joint 
action in the matter. 

Special patent lawyers have advised Sacra- 
mento that the De Camp people have a good 
case. — Modesto Herald. 



Pearl Oil Company in Trouble. 

The Pearl Oil company, operating in the 
Newhall oil field, is being sued by J. E. Gray 
on a contract, alleged to have been made on 
December 4, 1900, and which was amended in 
June 1901. Gray alleges that he undertook 
to drill the first eight oil wells for the com- 
pany, but that he has been denied the right 
to begin work on the third well, and his drill- 
ing machinery is lying idle on the ground at 
Newhall. 

It is further alleged that the Pearl Oil com- 
pany entered into another contract this year 
with H. Clay Needham, who has been one of 
the officials connected with the corporation, 
giving him the right to drill oil wells. For 
breach of this alleged contract Gray demands 
$7,000 as damages. 

The Pacific Oil. Rbportbr $2.50 per year. 



Royalty Claimants Sue City. 

The following from the Vacaville Reporter 
of late date affords further insight to the claims 
of De Camp et al for royalty ($15 per mile) 
based on a patent for oiling roads : 

"Suit has been brought pgainst the town of 
Vacaville In the Circuit Court of the United 
States by the fitm of De Camp and Mosher to 
recover damages in the sum of $500 'and such 
additional amount as the court may see fit to 
adjudge and order, together with costs,' for 
the infringement of a patent in using oil on 
roads. 

" Such, in brief, is the subatance of the sum- 
mons which was served on President Corn of 
the board of trustees on last week, and the full 
text of which, filling eight closely-written 
pages of typewriter copy, was read at the 
regular meeting of the board Tuesday even- 
ing. The plaintiff claims the ownership of 
certain patents granted to Frederick W. Mat- 
tern, as the inventor of a certain process for 
the application and admixture of the earthy 
surface of roads with crude petroleum, which, 
stripped of all verbiage, means that the plain- 
tiffs cl-im to possess the sole right to apply 
oil to the surface of the earth, and any town 
or county using oil on their thoroughfares, 
with tne exception of the counties of Santa 
Barbara, Ventura, Los Angeles, Orange, San 
Diego, San Barnardino and Riverside (which 
are held by another company), must pay them 
royalty. The answer to this summons must be 
made within thirty days. 

" No action was taken In the matter other 
than to instruct the clerk to correspond with 
the board of supervisors and see what action 
they are going to take ; and also address a 
letter to H. A. Mason, editor of Pacific Muni- 
cipalities, and ascertain what other towns are 
going to do} It was the general impression 
that the best thing to do would be to join with 
other towns and counties In a test case." 



Standard Oil Pays Dividend. 



With kerosene oil retailing at the highest 
price in many years and John D. Rockefeller 
declaring that the natural supply of the best 
grades of oil is rapidly being exhausted, the 
Standard Oil company has declared a dividend 
of $12 on its stock for the quarter. This was 
the regular quarterly pay day for the stock- 
holders in the great trust, a total of $44 in 
dividends being paid to them on their shares 
this year. On February 1 6th, $20 was paid; 
May 15th, $7, and August 12th, $5. Last year 
the total dividend was $45. 

John D. Rockefeller collects dividends on 
65 per cent of the capital stock of $100,000,- 
000. This will make bis income from the oil 
trust $28,600,000 for the past year. His asso- 
ciates and stockholders will collect a total of 
$14,750,000. 

On the curb, where Standard stock is dealt 
In, the price jumped $5 a share as soon as the 
dividend was announced and there was a 
scramble to buy. At the opening of the trad- 
ing today Standard brought $655 a share. It 
leaped to $658 and then to $660. — Chronicle. 



FOR SALE 

A complete oil well drilling 
outfit near Huntington, Ore- 
gon. Inventory and price 
on application to 

H. V. GATES, Hillsboro, Oregon. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



THE LATEST OIL NEWS. 



Recent Developments Which Have Made Oil One of the 
Greatest Industries in the Far West- 



Colusa. 

The Williams well is down 900 feet 
and will be closed down for the winter 
soon, owing to the difficulty of hauling 
water and fuel. It is estimated that for 
$600 water can be piped to the well. 

Driller Hastings of the Washington- 
California company, after difficult work 
of wo weeks, has succeeded in getting 
the tools out of the big well. The 
work of casing will now be taken up, 
and after this has been accomplished, 
drilling will go forward with increased 
spirit. Mrs. Jenkins and everybody 
connected with the company's working 
force have unbounded confidence that 
oil will be struck. We all sincerely hope 
so. 

Superintendent., Duffield telephoned 
. from Sulphur Creek too, late for our last 
issue, that a large volume of gas had 
been encountered at 483 feet, blowing 
pieces of sandstone, accompanied by 
water and considerable oil, through the 
hole and against the derrick, doing 
some damage to the structure. Vice- 
president Buck, who imparted the in- 
formation to us Friday, was considerably 
agitated and remarked there was a very 
good prospect of striking a "gusher." 
A. J.Atran, a mechanic of this place, 
was hurriedly summoned to the well on 
Sunday night. It is not known what 
has occurred. 

Three oil wells are being pushed along 
in Colusa county. Some new life has 
been injected and the stockholders of 
the several companies went down in 
the'r trouser's pockets and dug up suffi- 
cient funds to carry on the work until 
they were satisfied as to whether oil 
was to be found at a reasonable depth. 
Experts from Kern and from the east all 
agree that the indications in Colusa and 
Glenn are well worth looking after. Our 
people who have allowed their claims to 
revert to the government or to be taken* 
up by others, may yet regret their in- 
difference and carelessness. 
Devil's Den. 

The Devil's Den Consolidated Oil 
Co. has levied another assessment and 
. will sink another well about a rr ile to 
the north and west of its present well. 

The Sanborn Oil Company, operat- 
ing in section 36-26-18, has several 
thousand dollars worth of tools, ma- 
chinery, etc., now en its lands ready 
to begin extensive operations. It is 
the intention of this company to drill 
several wells at once. 

A company is now in process of or- 
ganization to operate an automobile stage 
line from Wasco on the Santa Fe to 
Devil's Den, a distance of forty-five 
miles. This will be a great convenience 
to oil men, and may prove a good in- 
vestment for the stockholders. 

The Standard Oil Company has 
agreed to put in a pipe line connect- 
ing this district with their main line 
to Poirt Richmond. In the meantime 
the Standard will construct a suffi- 
cient number of steel tanks to hold 
the output, and will buy all oil offered 
them. 

The main drawback to the Devil's 
Den district has been the lack of trans- 
portation, but now that the Standard 
has taken the matter in hand and agreed 
to furnish storage and buy all oil pro- 
duced, there has become quite a demand 
for leases and the belief is that the dis- 
t ict will rapidly come to the front. 

The recent discoveries make the out- 
loc for this district very good inde;d 



Smith & Eryner, who are operating in 
section 22-25-17, have s'ruck a imall 
quantity of very light oil in the Eocene 
of the Tertiary, a p'ace where oil is 
never obtained in large quantities, and 
the general belief is that when they tap 
the Miocene formation they will tap a 
large flow of a very high grade oil. 
Kern. 

The Apollo is drilling its No. 5. 

The Columbian Oil company at the 
Kern River iield has commenced drill- 
ing its well No. 6. 

The Peerless is pumping 5,700 barrels 
per day from twenty-seven wells, an 
average of 211 barrels each. 

W. D. Young and T, V. Doub, .oil 
brokers, report numerous sales of Asso- 
ciated oil sock with a brisk demand. 

W. E. Knowles and A_ J. Samuels, 
president and secretary of the West 
Shore, visited the' company's property 
in the Kern River district yesterday. 

There was a church Social at the 
new hall of the Associated Oil company 
in Kern River oil fields, Thursday even- 
ing, November 19th. There was a 
general good time with literary musical 
numbers. 

A large oil burning furnace is being 
put into the Webster Iron Works at 
Maricopa. This is similar to the ones 
used in town by this company and the 
Bakersfield Iron Works, and when com- 
pleted will add greatly to the facilities of 
this well equipped shop. 

The dance given Saturday night at 
the San Jcaquin lease at Kern River was 
attended by a large number of pe pie 
from the field and also from Bakersfie d 
and Kern. The affair was a success, as 
have been all those given by the San 
Joaquin Social Club. 

Fulton stock yesterday reached the 
high price of $4.25 per share. This 
stock was first, sold at $2 per share, 20,- 
000 shares having been sold at this fig- 
ure. The next block went for f J. No 
sales " have been made since, but the 
price has been stiffening until yester- 
day the above bid was made. 

Anderson & Kaye report the sale of 
the Acme lease at Sunset to George A. 
Reynolds, superintendent of the York 
syndicate. The Acme lease was owned 
by professional men of I^os Angeles, San 
Bernardino and other southern Califor- 
nia towns. Mr. Reynolds and his asso- 
ciates will proceed with development 
work at once. 

The Junction on 9, 29-28, at Kern 
River, has five wells now completed and 
will commence work immediately on No. 
6. The company has all its product 
contracted for and is an excellent pay- 
ing property. John M. Keif-, founder 
and one of the principal owners cf the 
company, has j ust been inspecting the 
property at the field. G 

The residents of Maricopa were treated 
to a real spectacular show last week. 
The Fulton well No. 5 dropped into a 
po:ket of gas, shooting the bailer out 
through the crown block and throwing 
the sand and rocks to a height of 
twenty-five or thirty feet above the der- 
rick. The accompanying sounds were 
heard two miles away and the blow-out 
lasted several minutes. 

The general sentiment among McKit 
trick oil men has been that section 
16, 30-22 is outside the oil belt, but the 
Crocker-Woolworth people, who are 
preparing to develop it, have strong 
faith in the judgment of their experts 



and have the money to push the test to 
a conclusion. The- progress of the drill 
will be watched with interest. 

About 10 o'clock last night ■ fire 
started on the Imperial property on 
33, 28-28 at Kern River and destroyed 
two large wooden tanks and the pump 
house. The tanks were empty at the 
time. The wood burned readily, caus- 
ing a very large blaze that was plainly 
seen from the city. Theloss will amount 
to several hundred dollars. The cause 
of the fire cannot be learned, 

The Tulare Oil and Mining company 
has just filed with the county recorder 
its patent from the United States for the 
southeast quarter of section 19 and 
southwest quarter of the : southwest 
quarter of section 20, 30 22, located at 
MeKittrick near the railroad station. 
The property is now occupied by the 
Shamrock and Virginia companies. 

As a sample of how the west .side fields 
are shipping oil of late it is said that he 
heaviest train (hat has been run out of 
that field cama in 'ast week. There were 
twenty-eight cars loaded with oil in the 
train. Much heavier trains than this 
have been hauled from Kern River 
every day, but it is considered a large 
load to come from the west side fields. 

The sales of Monarch, one of the lead- 
ing west side companies, were quite heavy 
thisweek on the exchange. Stockof this 
company has been selling in small 
blocks for some months past at about 5 j 
and 52 cents. Yesterday afternoon 1,000 
shares in six blocks of fifty, 200 and 300 
were handled at 50 and 51 cents. No 
reason for the sudden activity is known. 

The San Francisco-McKittrick is 
about to drill two more wells on its 
property on the Ej^ of 14, 30-21 at Mc- 
Kittrick, where four wells are already 
finished and in operation and a fifth is 
in the sand nearly j completed. The 



company has a large storage tank on its 
property and is pumping oil into it day 
and night and has connections with the 
Southern Pacific tanks at Olig station. 
The wells are all good producers. 

It is reported that the new casing for 
the Webfoot has arrived and that com- 
pany is to resume drilling operations in 
the Cuyama district, where it has been 
at work for several months. Operations 
were suspended a short time ago. The 
company is giving out very little in- 
formation as to its doings and the isolated 
position of its property renders it diffi- 
cult to learn much about the progress of 
its work. 

The directors of the Superior at a 
meeting just held have decided to offer 
the Santa Fe a fifty foot right of way 
across the company's property at Sun- 
set. The committee which visited the 
scene a few days ago reported in favor 
of this concession, which is not as much 
as the railroad may desire. It is said 
that to grant this will require the mov- 
ing of several buildings and other 
changes in the company's plans. 

The Standard Oil company has ex- 
hausted its reservoir capacity tempor- 
arily and has stopped taking oil for a 
few days. The company is rushing work 
on its new reservoirs, however, and the 
present situation is not expected to eg 
tinue long. In the meantime many 
the companies supplying oil to the 
Standard have storage facilities Of their 
own and will be able to continue their 
production until the; Standard's big 
reservoirs are roofed and ready for the 
oil. . 

The directors of the Superior Oil com- 
pany met Tuesday night to consider ti e 
report of the committee appointed to 
look over the ground at Sunset 1 in con- 
nection with the Santa Fe's request for 
a right of way for their Maricopa ext >n- 



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PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ii 



sion In accord ince with the com- 
mittee's report the directors decided to 
offer • lifty-foot strip for the right of 
way sufficient for their needs, but the 
directors of the Superior say thst this 
is all they feel willing t > offer at the 
present time. 

The Driller is the name of a new pub- 
lication devoted to the oil industry 
which milt its first appearance in 
Bakersfield on the islh <of the month. 
The paper will be published semi- 
monthly by J. Porter Bender and Everett 
Tiller of this city and will give the news 
of the oil fields in full. The proprietors 
are both practical ne *spaper men of ex- 
perience. Mr Tiller at one time con- 
ducted an oil journal in the Kentucky 
fields and Mr. Bender has also hail ex- 
perience in oil and mining. 

The report comes that John M. 
Wright, president of the Peerless and 
Pulton Oil companies, has begun drill- 
ing a test well on property acquired 
west of the mountains in the new fields 
which have been attracting so much at- 
tention of late among oil men. The re- 
port, if correct, may mean much for 
that district as Mr. Wright always carries 
an enterprise of this kind once started 
through to the limit and if there is oil 
in the fields west of the mountains he is 
expected to find it. Moreover if any oil 
is found, he will undoubtedly push the 
work of development with his accus- 
tomed vigor. 

The Reed Crude Oil company yester- 
day declared a dividend of $4 per share 
on the capital stock of the company of 
iod.oX) shares. This dividend is equi- 
valent to 20 cents per share on the 
2,000,000 shares of the company as 
formerly capitalized. The stockholders 
are notified that it will be necessary for 
those who have converted their original 
shares into the new series to do so be- 
fore the dividend can be paid to them 
This dividend 'epresents half the 
amount received by the company from 
the sale of Associated stock. The other 
half will be paid March 2nd with inter- 
est from November 2nd at 5 per «ent 
per annum. At that time another divi- 
dend will be declared. 

The McCutchecn brothers have signed 
a deed to the Santa Fe railroad for a 
right-of-way across their property at 
Sunset justnorth gf the Superior. This 
settles everything except the route 
across the property of the latter com- 
pany, which has offered fifty feet in- 
stead of the 100 feet asked for. The di- 
rectors have also imposed the condition 
that the company build a 160 feet spur 
at such point as they may designate for 
handling the oil company's business. 
The granting of the right-of-way will 
require the removal of a number of 
buildings which are directly in the 
route. One used as a saloon by a man 
nau-ed Moore will have to be entirely 
removed and compensation made him as 
he has acquired title to his place. 

The office of the Sunset Telephone 
company at the Kern River field was 
burned out Monday night about nine 
o'clock by the unusual pressure of the 
natural gas used for heating the build- 



ing and the interior of the office was 
burned out. For a time telephonic com- 
munira'.ion with the oil fields was par- 
tially interrupted, but soon restored, and 
by n on the office was entirely refitted 
•nd doing business. The office is located 
at the San Joaquin lease of the Associa- 
ted. The office was closed for the night 
a short time befort the fire broke out. 
The pressure of th: gas, which comes 
direct from the wells, became greater 
than usual all over that part of the field. 
It is supposed that a ss all fire had been 
left burning In the burner when the 
office was closed and the fire started from 
this. The fire company was called out 
and did good work in extinguishing the 
blaze before any greater damage was 
done, as other buildings were endanger- 
ed. Manager Staples was at the field 
and stated that the loss would be less 
than |ioo. The telephone company 
owned the building. 

John M. Wright, president of the 
Peerless and Fulton says that the Ful- 
ton No. 4 was perforated and equipped 
with a packer so as to admit its flowing 
freely ard it is now giving about 250 
barrels, as estimated by conservative oil 
men who have seen it. It is thought 
thst this weil will pay 10 per cent on 
$150,000. The first and fourth well are 
ready to be perforated as soon as the 
necessary packers are received. The 
company is using packers with much 
success, as are a number of other com- 
panies in the Sunset field. It is the 
most inexpensive method of handling a 
well. The reservoirs are completed and 
the roofing is all that remains to be put 
on. A new bunk house and stable is to 
be put up on the property, The ma- 
terial for all these has been ordered. 
Some time ago it was announced 
thtthe company had 8,000 shares to 
sell at $5. It has disposed of $8,000 of 
these shares. . it is believed that it will 
be able to pay dividends by the first of 
the year br before. When the company 
was first launched it was stated that it 
was thought that dividends would be 
paid within a year. 

Half Moon Bay. 

The High Gravity Oil company, 
operating at Half Moon Bay are now 
down 1,400 feet with every indication 
that they have a fine well. The hole is 
kept full of water so that it is impossible 
to determine just what they have but 
the bailings come up soaked with the 
oil. Mr. Turner, the principal stock- 
holder of the company, is very much 
pleased at the outlook. 

Santa Barbara. 

Work is progressing favorably and the 
drillers are making good headway on 
the California Coast company's well. 

Operations on the Brookshire well had 
to be temporarily suspended again on 
account of the non-arrival of casing 
The well is over 400 feet deep and the 
indications are excellent that oil will be 
found. 

The Union company has completed 
its oil pipi line from Graciosa to the 
wells and is now awaiting the comple- 
tion of its big tank. Drilling continue: 



on well No. a, with the same prospects 
of getting another good well. 

On the Western I'nion lichl the der- 
rick is now being erected for well No. 
IS, on which drilling will begin shortly. 
The new wall will be located south of 
the office and will have exceptional ele- 
vation as compared with the other wells. 
Well No 17, in which oil was found at a 
depth of 1,987, has 26 feet of oil sand 
and is one of the best wells yet located. 
The company is waiting for perforated 
casing before completing this well. 

The Newloves have raised the price 
of their 3,000 acre tract on the Los 
Alamos anticline to $1,000,000, and if it 
is as good oil territory as it is supposed 
to be it is worth a $1,000 per acre, and 
the prediction is made that inside of one 
year it will bring that price. With oil 
on all sides of a high grade, no one ac- 
quainted with the nature of such de- 
posits doubts that it will be a veritable 
bonanza when the drills are set in mo- 
tion. It is said that eastern: capitalists 
are on the way to examine this property 
with a view to buying. 

Operations in the Pinal field are con- 
tinuing without any marked changes, 
excepting that the Pinal company is now 
arranging to sink a fifth well. On ac- 
count of all the storage capacity being 
filled it will be imposs'ble to <?o much 
by way of handling the product until 
the Standard Oil company's tank at Port 
Harford is completed. When this is 
dona the wells will be opened and the 
pipe line kept busy until the contract 
for 120,000 barrels is completed. For a 
time this week the company had 
three wells flowing and it more than 
kept the manager, Mr. Goodwin, busy 
finding storage room. 

The Columbian Oil Asphalt and Refin- 
ing company are making some changes in 
part of the refinery at Carpenteria, pre- 
liminary to introducing some additional 
machinery for working the distillates into 
lubricating oil. For some time they have 
been selling crude asphalt to the county 
supervisors for surfacing the new 
bridges and the approaches adjacent. 
The supervisors hope to have all this 
surfacing done before the heavy rains 
set in. They find that the natural as- 
phalt from Carpenteria makes a much 
better and durable roadbed than the 
refined asphalt obtained from distilling 
the oil. 



Sargent'*. 

The Twelfth w.-ll at Sargents of the 
Watsonville Oil company was perfected 
at • depth of 1,200 feet and the oil and 
gas were forced about eighty feet high. 
It will average about 150 barrels per day 
and is the second paying well they have 
struck. Another well will he drilled 
immediately. 

Wyoming. 

Those who are Interested In section 
30, 14-118, are highly elated over the 
discovery of oil on that section Joseph 
Acocks, who is doing assessment work 
on the land, reports • splendid showing 
of petroleum at a normal depth. He 
says that oil can be encountered on al- 
most any tract of land in the vicinity of 
old Aspen and predict > a wonderful fie'd 
in that locality next summer. 



U. M. THOMAS 

318 Pine Street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



OIL LANDS 



Successor to the Land De- 
partment of the 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Buy and sell oil land in 
all the proven oil belts 
of California. 



Coalinga Lands a Specialty 



Tw> at— 5. ft, a. tin, -to Qtroe, 




FOR SALE 

IN 

KERN RIVER, Cheap 

Section 2, 29-28. 

Shaded portion map shows 40 aires three-fourths mile east of 
DISCOVERY WELL. U. S. Patent 22 years. EASY TERMS. 
Cheapest in Kern River. Write at once. 

WESTERN R. 1. CO., 

Room 36 Chronicle Bldg., 

San Francisco. 




(IRON) 



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509 MISSION STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



PACIFIC OIL, REPORTttK 



That Electric Road. 



The directors of the Bakersfield- 
Ventura electric railway have pur- 
chased 600 tons of rails and are 
about to place the contract for 
15,000 tons more. This is import- 
ant and gratifying news for the 
San Joaquin valley, if true, and 
there is no reason to doubt the 
correctness of the statement. As 
has before been pointed out, Ba- 
kersfield and the Kern valley can 
never become really prosperous in 
the sense that other communities 
are until there is a material reduc- 
tion in freight rates, and time has 
demonstrated that so far as the 
transcontinental railways are con- 
cerned there is no such thing as 
competition when rates of trans- 
portation are to be fixed. So long 
as it continues to cost as much to 
transport freight from tide water 
to Bakersfield as it does to haul it 
across the continent, just so long 
will this section of the state be 
sadly handicapped. 

With the construction of a road 
across the mountains direct to the 
sea, a distance of a little more 
than 100 miles, Bakersfield is al- 
most certain to become a terminal 
point, with all the advantages 
that the term implies. With such 
increased facilities, there is every 
reason to believe that Bakersfield 
will rapidly forge to the front as a 
manufacturing center. It has the 
raw material at hand and the 
greatest fuel supply on the coast 
is at her very door. But one thing 
is needed to make her a manufact- 
uring city and that is cheaper 
freights. A haul of 115 miles in- 
stead of 315 cannot fail to bring 
about this much desired result and 
every movement of the projectors 
of the electric road will be 
watched with the keehest interest. 



cific to obtain control of the Asso- 
ciated. Subsequent efforts on the 
part of the company seem to give 
weight to this report. Besides ac- 
quiring the holdings of the Reed 
Crude company the Southern Pa- 
cific has taken over those of the 
San Joaquin and Bear Flag, and 
has made offers for other large 
blocks. It is said to have a stand- 
ing offer of 50 cents a share for 
Associated." 



Declining Pipe Line Runs. 



Harriman *fter Associated 



The interest among oil men in 
the great deal between the Asso- 
ciated and the Southern Pacific 
continues as great as ever. 

In the course of an article on 
the efforts of Harriman to get con- 
trol of the combine, the Los An- 
geles Times says: 

"Rumors have been rife since 
the first sale of Associated stock. 
President Harriman stated that it 
was the aim of the Southern Pa- 



Both the Pennsylvania and 
Buckeye stocks suffered a reduc- 
tion in October and there was like- 
wise a considerable decline in the 
pipe line runs. The shipments of 
Pennsylvania oil were decreased 
during the month, while the Lima 
oil shipments made large gains 
and with the exception of June 
were the heaviest of the current 
year. The June shipments of 
Lima oil were the largest on rec- 
ord for five years past. October 
witnessed an advance in the price 
of crude oils of all grades, but 
there has been little change in 
relative conditions of supply and 
demand. The decline in the net 
stocks during October averaged 
over 6,500 barrels a day. — Oil City 
Derrick. 



New Pipe Tongs. 

Eugene Bates, formerly of Santa 
Barbara, but for the past five 
years a resident of Kern county, 
where he conducts a large ma- 
chine and blacksmith shop in the 
oil fields is in Santa Barbara on a 
visit to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Joseph Bates. He is the inventor 
of an appliance for holding and 
screwing together heavy pipe. It 
is so far superior to the ordinary 
tongs that it has been almost uni- 
versally adopted by operators in 
the oil fields. The sale has been 
so large that Mr. Bates' entire 
time is required to attend to the 
business and he has leased his 
machine shop. 



OH Burning Separator. 

Frank Sanders, the dairy 
rancher, of Modesto has contracted 
with B. Well & Son for the erec- 
tion of a complete separator plant 
on his ranch, including a steam 
boiler, heated by one of the latest 
oil burning devices. 





MAY BB HAD AS FOLLOWS: 

From Nov. i, 1809, to Nov. x, 1900 $6.00 

From Nov. 1 , 1900, to Nov. 1, 1901 6.00 


Bound Volumes 

of the 

Pacific 

Oil 

Reporter 


These volumes are strongly and 
artistically bound, and contain 
the only full and correct informa- 
tion as to the development of the 
oil industry on the Pacific coast. 


Editorial and Publishing Office 

318 Pine Street 
San Francisco, - Cal. 





THE 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



is the only 
OIL JOURNAL 
Published on the 
Pacific Coast. 

It gives full, fresh and authentic oil news from 
all the oil districts, new and old. It exposes 
fraudulent oil companies. It gives the latest 
information on oil stocks and dividends. It 
describes the latest method of drilling wells, 
pumping, piping and storing oil; use of oil for 
road making, etc. 

It is the only paper which advocates the belief 
that California's refined asphalt is the equal 
of Trinidad asphalt for paving and other pur- 
poses, and is in every way superior to bitumi- 
nous rock, the use of which has given San 
Francisco, Oakland and other California cities 
so many poor streets. 

The subscription price is $2.50 a year. If you 
are Interested in any way in California oil, cut 
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Please enter my subscription to the PACIFIC Oil, Reporter 
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Address 



Date 



PACIFIC OIL RBrORTBR 13 



or V 

I ANNOUNCEMENT I 

i» On January first, 1904, the PACIFIC OIL REPORTER jjj 

jjj will issue a Special New Year's Edition, covering the IJJ 

$ progress made in all of the California oil fields during 't\ 

\Jj the year 1903, and the outlook for the coming year, jjj 

jjj together with reliable figures on the output, etc. $ 

it/ This edition will be superbly illustrated and will 9) 

ili « 

* contain articles by those most prominent in the oil j!} 

jjj industry. From 25,000 to 30,000 copies will be circu= !J! 

it/ -^ 

vt> lated. Secure your advertising space at once, as it is '»> 

ifr ^ 

yjj already being rapidly taken. JJJ 

3/ W 

Vii * 

%> # 



14 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



More Standard T an ks at 
Point Richmond. 



The Staadard Oil company has 
already begun work in grading 
down the ground on the land re- 
cently purchased this side of 
Pinole. It is stated that this is to 
be the location for the storage of 
crude oil which will be brought to 
the refinery as required by gravi- 
tation. 

There are two reasons why the 
Standard Oil company chose the 
site on the high ground in the 
Pinole neighborhood for its stor- 
age tanks. The chief of these is 
that it removes the great volume 
of inflamable material from the 
refinery, where, in case of fire, 
the loss would be reduced to the 
minimum. The other reason is 
that in that locality land is cheaper 
than in the vicinity of Richmond. 

It is understood a large force of 
men will be put to work in order 
to complete a number of the big 
storage tanks as soon as possible. 

Rapid Oil Development. 

The vaste groves of derricks, the large 
tank farms and the immense amount of 
business which is being conducted in the 
various fields of this State is beyond con- 
ception to one who has never made a 
personal visit of the fields. Operators 
are incesently working to better their 
wells and the conditi . n of the fields, and 
the production is being gradually in- 
creased. 

When one takes into consideration the 
millions of barrels of oil that these fields 
have already produced, it would seem 
that the supply would soon be exhausted, 
but on the other hand when we remem- 
ber that one brick will absorb more than 
a quart of oil, we can grasp some con- 
ception of the great quantity which is 
stored in the oil bearing sands. The 
field is yet in its infancy, and there are 
yet untold millions to be derived from 
the California Oil Fields.— The Driller. 



Notice of Assessment. 



HIGH GRAVITY OIL COMPANY; 
Principal place of bus!ness, city and 
county of San Francisco, State of Cali- 
fornia. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meet- 
ing of the Board of Directors of the 
High Gravity Oil Company held on the 
18th day of November A. D. 1903, an 
assessment of ten (10) cents per share 
was levied upon the capital stock of the 
corporation, payable immediately to the 
Secretary of the corporation at its office 
No. 423 Market street, in the city and 
county of San Francisco, State of 
California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment 
shall remain unpaid on the 23rd day of 
December, 1903, will be delinquent and 
advertised for sale at public auction and 
unless payment is made before, will be 
sold on Wednesday the 13th day of 
January A. D. 1904, to pay the delinquent 
assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors. 
D. ROSENBUJM, Secretary. 
Location of office No. 423 Market 
street, city of San Francisco, State of 
California. 



900 at 
100 at 
500 at 
300 at 
too at 
100 at 
50 at 

3,000 at 
400 at 

So at 

250 at 

800 at 
500 at 
600 at 



45° at 
100 at 
100 at 



HOME OIL. 

1 00 . 

I 00 (B 30) 

1 o5(Bgo) 

97K - 

97'A (S 3°) 

97/2(6,0) 

97^ 

INDEPENDENCE. 

16 

17 

KERN. 

5 00 

LION. 

04 

MONARCH, 



49- 
50. 
51. 



MONTE CRISTO. 

85 

SOVEREIGN. 

40 

TWENTY-EIGHT. 
4 20 ... 



too 00 
100 00 
525 00 
292 50 

97 5> 
97 50 
48 62 



480 00 
64 00 



250 00 



392 OD 

250 00 
306 00 



382.50 

40 00 
420 00 



613 Market St., San Francisco. 



Amount $5, 100.62 



9,409 Shares 

NORTH SHORE R. R. CO. 

200 at 600 1,20000 

75 at 1100 82500 

275 Shares Amount, $2,025.00 
ASSOCIATED OIL CO. BONDS. 
2 M 70 00 f 14,00 00 

SPRING VALLEY WATER FIRST 

MG'T 6% 
2,000 at 105% 2,117 50 



The monthly record of sales since 
January 1, 1903, is as follows: 

Shares. Value. 



January 267,019 

February : 322,443 

March 199,908 

April 236,268 

May..,. ..401,454 

June 154,720 

July 74,594 

\ugust 181,478 

September 146, 123 



f 255, 202 
219,358 
151,982 
"5,57i 
154,386 
117,928 

71,890 
119,231 

74,455 



Mm, 



% w 



ALL THE WAY 

CHICAGO 
In 3 Days 



Trains leave Union Ferry Depot, San Fran- 
cisco, as follows: 

A. M.— *BAKERSFIKI,D LOCAL; Dne 
Stockton 10:40 a. m., Fresno 2:40 p. m., 
Bakersfield 7:15 p. m. Stops at all points 
in San Joaquin Valley. Corresponding 
train arrives 8:55 a. m. 
A. M.-g"THB CALIFORNIA LIMIT- 
ED;" Due Stockton 12:01 p. m., Fresno 
3:20 p. m., Bakersneld 6:00 p. m., Kansas 
City 3rd day 2:35 a. m., Chicago 3rd day 
2:15 p. m. Palace Sleepers and Dining 
Car through to Chicago. No second class 
tickets honored on this train. Corres- 
ponding train arrives °n:io p. m. 
A. M.— *VALLBV LIMITED; Due 
Stockton 12:01 p.m., Fresno 3:20 p. m, 
Bakersfield 6:00 p. m. The fastest train 
in the Valley. Carries Composite and 
Reclining Chair Car. No second class 
tickets honored on this train. Corres- 
ponding train arrives 11:10 p. m. 
P. M.— * STOCKTON LOCAL; Due 
Stockton 7:10 p. m. Corresponding train 
arrives 11:10 a. m. . . 

8AA F. M:— *OVERLAND EXPRESS ; Due 
'till Stockton 11:15 P- m., Fresno 3:15 a. m., 
•*'» BakersBeld 7:35 a. m , Kansas City 4th 
day 7:00 a. m., Chicago 4th day 8:47 p. m. 
Palace and Tourist Sleepers and free Re- 
clining Chair Cars through to Chicago. 
Also Palace Sleeper which cuts out at 
Fresno. Corresponding train arrives 
6:25 p. m. 

g Mondays and Thursdays 
o Tuesdays and Fridays. 
Personally Conducted Parfles for Kansas 
City, Chicago and East leave on Overland Express 
Monday, Thursday'and Saturday at 8:00 p. m. 
Ticket Offices, 641 Market Street and In Ferry 
Depot, San Francisco; and 1112 Broadway 
Oakland. 



•45 

.20 
.85 
.II 



Stock Quotations. 

Following are the latest quotations for 
stocks of oil companies listed on the Cal- 
ifornia Stock and Oil Exchange : 

Oil Stocks, Bid. Asked. 

Alma 1.35 

Apollo. 42 

Asso. Oil Co Stk. Tr. 

Certificates 19 

Aztec... 

Bay City 

Bear Flag, 

California Standard ... .12 

Caribou 

Central Point Con. 
Chicago Crude.... 

Clalremont 

Esperanza 

Fauna 

Four 

Fulton 425 

Giant 

Hanford 13203 

Home c,jyi 

Homestake 

Imperial . 



90 

19 

24 

1.50 



1. 00 

•75 



1 60 

.12 

6> 



13700 

ICO 



California Stock and Oil 
Exchange. 

The following were the stock sales in 
the California Stock and Oil Exchange 
in the formal sessions held for the week 
ending Wednesday, November 18th. 

APOLLO. 

500 at 45 I 225 00 

CARIBOD. 

100 at 1 05 105 00 

CLAIRMONT. 
500 at 23 11500 



So 



18 
• 27 



Independence 16 

Junction 18 

Kern 4 7J 

Kern River i,.oj 

Lion 03 

Monarch of Arizona ... , <, 9 

Maricopa 

McKittrick 

Monte Cristo 

Nevada 

Occidental of West Va 

Oil City Petroleum 

Peerless 

Petroleum Center 

Piedmont , 

Pittsburg 

Reed Crude 

Reed Crude, New Issue 

S.F.& McKittrick.... 2.75 
San Joaquin O. & D . . . 4.0 j 

Senator 

Shamrock 

Sovereign 38 

Sterling 2.70 

Superior 05 

Thirty-three 7.00 

Toltec 22 

Twenty- eight 

Union 

United Petroleum 

West Shore 2.85 

Western Petroleum 

Wolverine 25 



•17 
19 
5 25 
13.10 
04 
50 
11 
30 

45 

20 

.28 

14.25 



•75 



2.85 



4-5o 



7:30 
9:30 

9:30 
4:00 



'Daily 



TO THE EAST 



SUNSET ROUTE 

Means a Trip Taken 

IN COMFORT 

Oiled Track==No Dust 
Oil-Burning Engines 
No Cinders 
No Frost==No Snow 

SUNSET LIMITED 

San Francisco to New Orleans 

EVERY DAY 

Dining car, meals a la carte 

Observation Car 

Vestibuled Pullman Sleepers 
Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, 

EI Paso, San Antonio, 

Houston, Beaumont and 

Texas Oil Fields. 



Southern Pacific 



UNION 
PACIFIC 

i . 

Suggests 

Speed 
and 
Comfort 

8. F. Booth, Gen. Agent. 

1 Montgomery St., 8. F. 

Phone, Exchange 300. 



W. A, BROPHY, 

914 Mutual Savings Bank Bldg., 

70S Market St., San Francisco. 
Telephone, Green 816. 



Petroleum Lands Examined and Re- 
ported on in all Farts of the United 
States. California a Specialty. 



Companies Incorporated 

under the lienient laws of 
ARIZONA 

which has the broadest laws of any state. 
Companies can be organized to do busiuess any 
where Wo personal liability. No limit on cap! 
talization. . No State examination of books. No 
franchise tax. Stock can be made non-assessable 
and can be issued for services. 

Write for information and blanks to 
HUGH M. CREIGHTON & CO. 
Phoenix, Arizona. 



Stock, Bond and Investment Syndicate 

(Incorporated) 
Money Loaned on Stocks. 

Listed and Unlisted OH and Mining Stocks 
,R. L. CHBNUY, Secretary 
514-515 Examiner Building 

i San Francisco. California 

Notice to Creditors. 



Have You Securities 

that pay no dividends and you want 
some that do? If you want to buy, sell 
or exchange investment stocks, or if you 
want gilt-edge shares in operating com- 
panies, address the Debenture Surety 
Company, Rialto BIdg., San Francisco, 
which also incorporates, finances and 
operates good enterprises. - 



AMERICAN CONSOLIDATED 
OH Company 

A. B. Butler, J. A. Chanslop, 

President Vice President 



13,750 shares of stock for sale at 
8 cents per share — par value $1.00 



P. W. SPAULD1NG 

ATTORN EY-AT-LAW 

Evanston - . Wyoming 



Estate 0$ William B. Winn, deceased. 

Notice! is hereby given by the under- 
signed, executrix of the estate of William 
B. Winn, deceased, to the creditors of, 
and all persons having claims against, 
the said deceased, to exhibit them, with 
the necessary vouchers, within four 
months after the first publication of this 
notice to the said executrix at the office 
of William H. Waste, attorney-at-law, 
906 Broadway, Oakland, Cal., which said 
office the undersigned selects as her 
place of business in all matters connected 
with the said estate of William B. Winn, 
deceased. 

MARIA ROSA WINN, 
Executrix of the last will and testament 
of Wiliam B. Winn, deceased. 

Dated Oakland, September 28, 1903. 

Wiuum H. Waste, attornery for 
estate, Oakland, Cal. 



J. 8. EWEN 

STOCKBROKER 

318 PINE STREET, Room 5 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Member California Stock and Oil Ex- 
change, and San Francisco and Tonopah 
Mining Fxchange. 

Telephone Main 1552. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 5. No. 4 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., SATURDAY. NOVEMBER 28, 1903. 



Pricb, Tkn Cknts. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Publl.h.d W..kl, 
The Oil Authority o( the Pacific Colt. 
4 B> California P.troJ.aa. Miner.' Aaaoelatloa 



MRS. MARIA ROSA WINN, Proprietor. 

E. S. !•: A3TMAN, 
Editor and Butlneaa Manager 



OrriCB AI«D KDITOBIAL ROOIU 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco, California 

Telephone. Bush 176. 



nun 

OKI Yr.i 

SlX UOKTHS 

T^K«» MOHTH8 

Si«olb Coria* ioc 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 



..1 50 



Mown should be sent by Postal Order, Draft tt Registered 
Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil Reporter. 318 Pine street, San 
Francisco, rooms Ji-3>3J. Communications must be accompanied by 
writer's name and address, not necessarily Tor publication, but 
as a guarantee of good faith. 



Entered in the PostofBce at San Francisco, California, ss second- 
class matter. 



HISTORY OF THE STANDARD. 



The second part of Ida M. Tarbells' history 
of the Standard Oil company, will begin in 
the December issue of McClures magazine. 
The first part of the story commanded wide 
attention, in fact Mr. Rockefeller says he read 
it himself. He doubtless learned a great deal 
about his early career. The "history" is a 
very interesting piece of historical fiction. 



OH Men Alarmed. 



The Californlan says that the Justices of 
the Supreme Court of this state are puzzling 
over what is said to be the most perplexing 
problem ever presented to an American tri- 
bunal. The case is absolutely unique in the 
jurisprudence of the United States. There is 
apparently no authority for a decision in 
behalf of either of the litigants. 

The members of the state's court of final 
appeal have pulled down all the dusty old 
tomes from the top shelves in a vain endeavor 
to secure some light on the subject over which 
they study. Draconian law, Roman law, 
English law and the law of the other civilized 
countries appeal to be barren of information 
which would tend to elucidate the question. 
The Justices would delve further into the 
jurisprudence of antiquity, but even Solomon's 
decisions are not a matter of record, to say 
nothing of what happened in the tribunals 
of the eras of mystery and doubt which pre- 
ceded the dawn of history says the Call. 

In the present case two score of California's 
eminent jurists have been engaged in the pre- 
paration of arguments. Thousands of the 
state's capitalists are interested in the settle- 
ment of the dispute; and the Supreme Court 
sits meditatively knitting its brows. 

It all had a small beginning down in San 
Bernardino county. Leah J. Katz was the 
owner of an artesian well. Margaret D. 
Walkinshaw, who was the possessor of prop- 
erty adjoining that on which the artesian 
well was located, approved of this method, 
by which water could be so easily secured, 
and determined to emulate her neighbor's 
example. A well was bored in mother earth 
and eventually Mrs. Walkinshaw was getting 
daily a generous supply of the original nat- 
ural liquid. 



When Mrs. Walkinshaw's artesian well 
commenced to be productive the water supply 
in the Kalz well began to fall short. Mrs. 
Kalz alledged that Mrs. Walkinshaw had 
tapped her submarine river. Mrs. Walkin- 
shaw alledged that she owned whatever of 
the underground stream that might be on her 
own propercy. The ladies could not seem to 
come to a mutual decision as to what were 
their respective rights. Each acknowledged 
the claimof the other to a portion of the earth, 
but both were in doubt as to the ownership of 
the waters under the earth. 

The matter was finally referred to the 
courts for jurisdiction. The case was hastily 
passed up to the Supreme Court. There were 
all sorts of water cases on record. There were 
dozens of irrigation suits, riparian rights suits 
and drainage suits, but when it came to sub- 
terannean rivers the law was as unproductive 
of information as the wastes of San Bernardino 
county are of mangoes. 

Justice Temple, then a member of the 
Supreme Court, went to work on the tangle 
and at last produced an opinion which Justices 
McFarland, VauDyke, Harrison and Henshaw 
and Chief Justice Beatty signed in token of 
assent. It was declared that the court trial 
had erred in granting a non-suit and that Mrs. 
Katz had some merit in her contentions. A 
new trial was ordered. The case would have 
gone back to the Superior Court for a new 
trial, but a new difficulty arose. 

The owners of oil producing properties 
became excited when they were apprised of 
the decision of the Supreme Court. They 
began asking on: another who had tapped 
other people's subterannean reserviors of 
petroleum. Could the gentleman who first 
dropped his drill through the enveloping 
strata claim all the oil in Kern county? 

Could some one in Kings county commence 
suit against the fellow who was erecting a 
derrick in Sonoma? If a man owned land 
beneath which was a wealth of oil, should he 
not have a right to get some of it? Perhaps 
the neighbor who had bored the first well had 
merely struck a branch of the first man's 
deposit of petroleum. If the first person who 
tapped an underground river owned the 
entire supply lo the possession of the oil flow- 
ing in tiny streamlets through the terrestrial 
crust? 

A petition for a hearing was tied in the 
Supreme Court within the time allowed by 
law. In this document the question of perco- 
lation was the vital point. The Supreme 
Court immediately decided to reconsider. 
That was more than a year ago. 

When the case came up for a hearing in 
bank various attorneys appeared for interest- 
ed parties. Afterward, when the court had 
ordered the case submitted, briefs of great 
number, length and wisdom were filed. Inas- 
much as the geological savants are unable to 
explain exactly how fluids pass to and fro 
beneath the surface of the earth, it may be 
evident that the Jmtices of the Supreme 
Court of California have a right to puzzle over 
the answer to the question of ownership of 
subterannean matter which is not stationary. 
Outside of the dispute over ;he oil and water 
phase of the question, the mining men are 
wondering about detritus. 



The decision will be eagerly awaited, not 
only by those financially interested, but by 
the legal luminaries of two continents. The 
Katz- Walkinshaw suit is now known as " the 
percolation case" and the Supreme Court 
strives vainly to solve it. So deeply are the 
Justices engaged that no other opinion has 
been handed down for several days. 

Against Asphalt Monopoly. 

The Petroleum Gazette says: Oil men who 
are interested in the production of asphalt in 
this country as a good many oil men are, par- 
ticularly in California, will note with satisfac- 
tion changes in specifications which are being 
brought about in some of the larger cities. 
Even in PhlladelphiB it has been officially 
decided to drop from such specifications the 
following clause: 

" Provided, Where streets are to be re-paved 
with sheet asphaltum the material shall be 
Trinidad Lake or Bermudez Lake sheet 
asphaltum." 

This clause has heietofore given the 
Asphalt Trust a practical monopoly of the 
asphalt business in that city. In noting the 
recent elimination of the monopoly clause the 
Philadelphia North American says: "The 
immediate effect of the committee's action will 
be to bring low bids for the needed repairs 
from a number of competing land asphalt com- 
panies. It is expected that they will be very 
much lower than the contract price of $2.50 a 
yard paid in the past years and of $2.18 paid 
last spring to the Asphalt Trust. It is known 
that the Asphalt Trust officers have foreseen 
that Mayor Weaver would succeed in break- 
ing the monopoly enjoyed by them as the 
result of the lake asphalt specification. Their 
foresight has led them to acquire control of 
several land asphalt properties. The trust, 
therefore, will unquestionably be represented 
in the approaching bidding by several of its 
subsidary companies. An idea of the saving 
to the city that should come from the reform 
is gained by studying the experience of 
Brooklyn in like case. There under the same 
competition throttling scheme that has just 
been abolished here, the price for paving with 
sheet asphalt exceeded $260 a yard. The 
'joker' clause was repealed there about a 
year ago, and high-class paving, equal at 
least to that done by the trust, is now laid 
under amply bonded contracts for $1.07 to 
$1.15 per square yard. Camden also threw 
off the yoke of asphalt monopoly about three 
months ago and has since let paving contracts 
at prices far below those paid in past years 
when the 'joker' was in force. 



Russian Oil Goes Up. 

The Baku oil combination, engineered by 
the Nobel and Rothschild interests, has added 
15 percent to the prices of oil throughout 
Russia. The sepresentattves of the combina- 
tion claim that the increase in price had been 
made necessary by the recent labor troubles 
in Baku and the many fires in the oil fields. 

The Moscow "Gazette" declares that the 
combination is keeping back immense re- 
serves which do not appear in the official 
report. 

It is believed that Russia is threatened with 
another period of high prices similar to that 
prevailing from 1897 to 1900. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



Petroleum as an Ore Concentrator. 



A letter from Rossland, B. C, says that the 
results at the Le Roi No. 2 mill with the 
Elmore oil concentration process are so satis- 
factory as to warrant other companies pro- 
ceeding without delay to employ concentra- 
tion. The companies will place orders for 
machinery before the end of the year for 
delivery In the spring and will start construct- 
ion as soon as the weather permits. 

Some remarkable results are reported in the 
initial runs of the Le Roi No. 2 oil concentra- 
tor. Ore containing one-tenth of one per 
cent of copper was concentrated 30 to 1, the 
product being a 3 per cent copper concentrate. 
The saving in copper was more than 90 per 
cent and the loss in gold was trifling. The 
success of the oil concentration process is 
absolutely assured and the only problem now 
confronting the mines that contemplate estab- 
lishing mills is that of whittling down the 
cost of milling. 

Prof. S. B. Christy states that the great 
advantage of the Elmore process is that cer- 
tain mineral*, which are very brittle, that 
break very fine and form slimes, which are 
almost Impossible to concentrate by the ordi- 
nary method, can be very simply and cheaply 
handled. It, therefore, Is not Intended to dis- 
place the ordinary methods of concentration, 
although it can do so in some cases with suc- 
cess. Ordinarily, the concentration of miner- 
als In a wet way depends on specific gravity. 
The minerals to be saved have to be heavier 
than those that go off in the tailings, and un- 
less this is the case, it is impossible to concen- 
trate them. The less dense the material is, 
the harder it Is to concentrate by water and 
easier it is to concentrate with the oil. So it 
just fills a gap vacant in the methods we have 
hitherto had. Just as the cyanide process 
came in to treat ores which could not be treat- 
ed by amalgamation, so this process comes in 
to treat ores that cannot be well concentrated 
by the wet methods. A very remarkable 
Instance of this sort is in the case of the ore of 
molybdenite. It is almost impossible to con- 
centrate the mineral by any wet process. It 
breaks it Into a fine impalpable powder like 
graphite, which it resembles. It floats away 
in the water. Oil takes it up with the great- 
est avidity. It takes it up and holds It more 
than any other mineral. Cinnabar is also a 
mineral that cannot be concentrated in the 
ordinaryiway by water, and the oil takes that 
up with avidity. 

In this process, the ore, as a rule, Is crushed 
to about 20 or 30 mesh. Thirty meshes seem 
to be better on the whole than any other size, 
although sometimes it is expedient to crush it 
as small as 60. At any rate, the mineral must 
be crushed fine enough to separate the non- 
metallic from the gangue. The reason of that 
Is partly owing to the fact that this oil picks 
the middlings; that is, if you have a piece of 
ore which is half quartz and half molybdentie, 
the molybdenite is picked up and the whole 
thing is carried together. That is a thing 
which Is not liable to happen in the ordinary 
concentration. By this process there is saved 
what the wet method would lose. 

The oil preferred is a good, thick, risidual 
oil, the oil mostly used by Elmore having been 
the paraffin oils, the Pennsylvania oils, such, 
for example, as an oil about the consistency 
of what is commonly called cylinder oil, which 
is pretty thick and rather viscid. The oil is 
fed very abundantly. For example, to treat 
a ton of ore they use from a third to a half and 
sometimes a whole ton of oil, but as the oil is 



used over again that does not make much dif- 
ference. That oil is usually of a specific 
gravity of about .9, so a ton of oil would be 
able to carry a load of 100 or 200 pounds of 
sulphuretes. 

As the material flows out of the mixing 
cylinder, the tailings pass away and are us- 
ually low enough to be rejected, the oil that 
flows over is caught in an overflow tank, and 
it carries its load of sulphurets very well (un- 
less they become overloaded) and they flow 
off in the surface of the overflow tank, and 
then run into a vessel where they are heated. 
They are heated to about 100 degrees Fahren- 
heit, or a little hotter, depending on the thick- 
ness of the oil, so that the oil is made thin and 
limpid. This is quite Important. The mat- 
erial is then run into the centrifugal machine, 
and it is well to have a little hot water in 
their first. The water and sulphurets are 
thrown to the outside, the oil passes to the 
inside, the sulphurets pass through the water 
and strike the wall of the centrifugal and stay 
there. Meanwhile, water is fed in, also hot, 
and it displaces the oil, washes the oil out 
from the sulphurets, and the oil flows to the 
inside and is discarded, and is used over again 
after having been cleaned in this fashion. 
There Is still some water left in the centrifu- 
gal, together with a little oil, and after the 
large-sized centrifugal gets full It holds about 
1. 000 pounds of concentrates. The bottom of 
the centrifugal is then raised up, and the mat- 
erial Is hosed into a second centrifugal with 
perforated baskets on the outside and a cloth 
lining. In this the sulphurets are separated 
from the water with which they were formerly 
mixed, after driving the oil out, and in this 
condition they are ready for the market. 
There is still a little residual oil adhering to 
the sulphuretes, which can be at once remov- 
en by using gasoline or some material of that 
sort, but usually this is not necessary, and it 
is an advantage to have a little oil there, in 
case the sulphurets have to be made into 
briquets for the smelting furnace. 

The amount of oil wasted in the process is 
said to run from 1 to 3 gallons per ton of ore, 
but it depends more upon the amount of sul- 
phurets than it does on the amount of ore 
treated. Ores containing a great deal of sul- 
phurets will absorb more oil than those con- 
taining less. 

It is a curious- fact, also, that the use of 
petroleum compounds succeeds in the concen- 
tration of diamonds. The plan used is to take 
a cast-iron plate with a number of grooves 
across it, about 3 inches wide, and about % 
inch deep, and fill these with grease, such as 
axle grease, and this is made into an inclined 
table a good deal like a Frue concentrator, 
and about the same slope, and given an oscil- 
lating motion. The pulp floats over the sur- 
face, the diamonds are caught by tne grease 
and held there, the material after being wash- 
ed clean is scraped out from time to time, the 
grease melted, the diamonds taken out, and 
the grease used over again. — Oil, Paint and 
Drug Review. 



To Bore for Oil at Seaside. 



Boring for oil will be begun near Seaside > 
about three miles from Monterey, within the 
coming week. B. N. Baker, a Baltimore mil- 
lionaire, who, until the formation of the great 
steamship trust, controlled large interests in 
the White Star and Cunard lines, is the oper- 
ator, and so well satisfied is he that there is 
oil in plenty here that he is preparing to sink 
a well immediately. 

Mr. Baker, who came to Del Monte last 



spring on a tour of the coast, was greatly 
struck with the possibilities of the country to 
the east of the hotel, and Immediately opened 
negotiations for the purchase of the Bostrom 
ranch, a tract of land comprising something 
over 500 acres, and running back from the 
Seaside waterfront to a point in the foothills 
south of the old Monterey and Fresno grade. 
The deal was consummated last June. 

Since that time Mr. Baker has been quietly 
preparing to develop this property. A few 
days ago he came to Del Monte, accompanied 
by Henry S. Gans, a mining engineer, and 
has since been preparing to commence oper- 
ations. 

Mr. Baker said: "Yes, I am going to bore for 
oil. I do not know if there is any oil on the 
land, but I am willing to spend a little money 
to find out. The indications are very favor- 
able, and I am prepared to go down 1,000 
feet to ascertain their value. The drillers and 
rig will be here in a day or so, and they will 
commence work as soon as they arrive." 

That Mr. Baker is in earnest in his search 
for oil is evident from the fact that it will cost 
him not lessthan $9,000 to bore an oil well 1,000 
feet deep, and probably much more than that 
amount. If he is successful, however, which 
is not at all impossible, all of this section of 
country, and particulrrly Seaside and the ad- 
joining territory, is likely to enjoy a great 
boom— the boom that has followed the dis- 
covery of oil in every section of the state— 
for oil means wealth to the country producing 

Some years ago, residents of seaside dis- 
covered indications of oil and natural gas 
there, and so confident were they of the 
existence of liquid fuel there that boring for 
It was commenced. The cost of boring, how- 
ever, was heavy, and operations were soon 
discontinued. The oil fields of Eos Angeles, 
the only ones in the state at that time, were 
in their infancy, and little attention was paid 
to the supposed find at Seaside. Since then, 
however, oil has been found in many different 
sections. The Eos Angeles fields have de- 
veloped enormously, the great Kern River 
fields are producing vast quantities of liquid 
fuel, oil has been developed at Santa Barbara, 
and only lately it has been struck at Chit- 
tenden, not many miles from here on the 
coast line. It is well within the bounds of 
possibility that oil may be found here.— New 
Era. 



Wants Lease Forfeited. 



The Midway Oil company today filed a 
suit against Edmond A. Bruce, the Sioux Oil 
company and the Mitchell Crude Oil com- 
pany to declare forfeited a lease on forty 
acres on the SE^ of the SEX °f section 
8, 32-23 in the Midway field, made by the 
plaintiff to the defendant, Bruce, for ten 
years from May 20, 1901, with option of re- 
newal. It is alleged that the case was , as- 
signed by Bruce to the Sioux Oil company 
and the latter assigned by that corporation to 
the Mitchell Crude Oil company. The plain- 
tiff alleges that the terms of the case have not 
been carried out as to the development of the 
property and therefore asks that the same be 
forfeited and it be adjudged the owner of the 
fixtures and casing at the well on the pro- 
perty and that it be given judgment for the 
costs. Louis Titus and H. M. Wright of San 
Francisco are attorneys for the plaintiff. 



The subscription price of the Pacific 
Rbortbr is $2.50 per year. 



Oil. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Methods in Austria. 



Frank Drader, general manager for Berg- 
helm & McGarvey of f'.alica, Austria 
present making Los Angeles his headquarters, 
with the object in view of investigating the 
methods In use in California of producing and 
marketing petroleum. The company which 
Mr. Drader represents is one of the largest oil 
concerns in the world and bears the same rela- 
tion to Austria as does the Standard Oil com- 
pany to the United States. 

Mr. Drader, in speaking of oil operations in 
that country, says they are conducted on a 
somewhat different basis than those of the 
United States, but, owing to a' similarity in 
rock formations and other conditions, more 
nearly resemble the California fields than any 
other, and it is for that reason that Mr. Drader 
is now in California. 

The oil business has been carried on In 
Austria more or less extensively for about 
fifty years, but not until about twenty years 
ago were any systematic efforts made to estab- 
lish the industry on a modern basis, before 
that time the operators being satisfied with 
sinking shafts similar to those used in gold 
and other mining enterprlies. There are still 
some of these shafts 500 feet deep, but they 
are no longer operated. 

All the oil fields of Austria are located in 
the Carpathian mountains and extend In the 
general direction of the mountain ranges for a 
distance of probably six hundred miles. The 
wells range in depth from fifteen hundred to 
thirty-five hundred feet deep and are very 
expensive to sink, but the operators are amply 
repaid for the cost, as some will produce about 
five thousand barrels of oil a day. The oil 
has a paraffine base and is worth in its crude 
state about $2 a barrel. While the formation 
is very similar to that found in the average 
California field, entirely different methods are 
employed In drilling. 

What is called the Canadian system of 
drilling is used almost entirely, although 
recently some of the operators have adopted 
the American regular drilling outfit. The 
Canadian system, so called because employed 
first in the oil fields of Petrolia, Canada, con- 
sists of the pole tools. The bit is attached to 
a string of wooden poles and in some cases 
iron stems, similar to California auger stems, 
but smaller, and as the hole is drilled more 
poles are added, taking the place of the 
cables. In place of a temper screw, the tools 
are lowered by means of a " drill chain " pass- 
ing over the walking beam and attached to a 
ratchet arrangement placed directly above the 
sampson post on the beam. 

The holes are started with twenty-five inch 
stovepipe casingand about eight strings of this 
kind of casing are used, gradually reducing 
the hole in size to eleven inches, when screw 
casing is put in, starting with ten-inch and 
again reducing the size as the hole is deep- 
ened, until the well is finished with five|or 
four-inch pipe. In this way about fourteen 
strings of casing are used, a feat which would 
make a California operator almost gasp. This 
will give some idea of the expense of securing 

a well. 

Mr. Drader states that a well 3,500 feet in 
depth costs the owner about $40,000; and this 
notwithstanding the fact that drillers are only 
paid from 80 cents to $1 a day. These drillers 
are natives of the country and have been 
taught to work with the pole tools quite satis- 
factorily. Thus it is seen that labor is the 
smallest item of expense connected with the 
business. If California drillers were employ- 
ed at the California price of $6 and $8 a day, 



drilling for oil In Austria would be almost im- 
possible, unless much better time could be 
made with the cable system; which is very 
likely because the average time of getting a 
well down there is considerably over a year. 
In some of the fields, the water Hush or 
hydraulic system of drilling is employed, with 
the exception that a regular bit, instead of a 
rotary, is used: but this is only in shallow 
territory, and would be useless for deep drill- 
ing. 

The Bergheim & McGarvey company own 
about 600 producing wells, and have two large 
refineries, where their oil is treated. The oil 
furnishes a high percentage of illuminating 
oil, which, of course, is the chief product, but 
all the by-products generally secured from 
paraffin oil are also manufactured. 

Mr. Drader is so well satisfied with the 
methods in California that he has decided to 
take back with him a complete Standard drill- 
ing outfit, such as is used in the fields of Cal- 
ifornia, which, incidentally, is a high compli- 
ment to the oil operators of this state. 



J. D. and the "Anarchist." 



Even the high iron-spiked fences of John 
D. Rockefeller's private eighteen-hole golf 
links at Cleveland, with each gate 
guarded by six-feet green-coated henchmen, 
was not sufficient to protect the Standard Oil 
magnate from one kind of crank, according 
to the story related by Major Carlos H. Blos- 
som of Cleveland, who is here attending the 
horse show. 

"We were just leaving the twelfth tee, I 
think," said the major, "when the serving 
man just beside John gave a yell, "Look out,' 
dropped a glass or two off his tray, and the 
next thing I knew John had dropped his 
brassy and was off down the hill like a whirl- 
wind. I followed along, looking around to 
see what the trouble was, when all at once I 
caught sight of a figure flying over the knoll 
back of us, with his hair straight back from 
his head, and something black and dangerous 
in appearance waving in his hand, and a six- 
footer with his green coat-tails flying coming 
behind like a steam engine. When I caught 
up, John was in the bushes around the first 
tee, with his head covered with leaves and — 
we were both pretty scared, I tell you. 

"I crawled in near him, and John cursed 
his serving man as a coward — the fellow had 
beat us all out in the run in — and wondered 
if the crank really would throw the bomb 
before Peter caught him, when suddenly 
Peter appeared up the hill with the fellow by 
the coat collar. We saw that he had a bottle 
in his hand — that is, the anarchist had — 
and he had long hair and a red nose. Well, 
John yelled out before me: 

" 'Hey, there, Peter, stop where you are 
and — and destroy that bomb, or do something. 
Can't you see, you idiot? Don't come any 
nearer.' 

'■The anarchist laughed grimly at this. 

"'Mr. Rockefeller, I believe, Well, I have 

here ' he held up the bottle, but before he 

could throw it, Peter had jerked him .back and 
the bottle went out of his hands and up into 
the air. When we took our heads from the 
ground, there the bottle lay, emptying a red 
liquid into the grass, and the anarchist was 
looking sad, and Peter was holding on to his 
mouth like a fool. 

"Thank God!" said John, eyeing the broken 
glass suspiciously. — Examiner. 

The subscription price of the Pacific Oil - 
Reporter is $2.50 per year. 



Publications of Geological Survey. 

That people in general do not take advan- 
tage of their opportunities Is a truth as vener- 
able as society itself. A particular appllc»- 
tlon of it is seen In the fact that many who 
would be benefited by a study of the publica- 
tions of the United States Geological Survey 
do not apparently realize the privileges to 
which they are entitled. The Government is 
at great expense to maictaln scientific 
bureaus the chief ends of which are to increase 
the sum of human knowledge and to Inform 
the people of the United States of the practi- 
cal results of the investigations made. Every 
means is taken to give the public the widest 
possible benefit of the discoveries and Invent- 
ions of science. Large sums of money are 
annually expended in printing maps, folios, 
papers, bulletins, monogiaphs, and scientific 
reports of one kind and another, the great 
majority of which are Intended for general 
and gratuitous distribution. 

Many of the publications of the Survey are 
of special Interest to inhabitants of particular 
localities and should have wide circulation in 
the areas they concern. To further this epd 
it seems advisable to call the attention of 
librarians throughout the country to a con- 
gressional act approved March 3, 1903, which 
provides that " the Director of the Geological 
Survey shall hereafter distribute to public 
libraries that have not already received them, 
such copies of sale publications as may remain 
on hand at the expiration of five years after 
date of delivery to the Survey document 
room, except a reserve which shall not exceed 
two hundred copies." 

This concerns only the sale publications of 
the Survey. The great number of pamphlets 
and reports intended for free distribution may 
be procured at any time by mere application 
to the Director of the United States Geologi- 
cal Survey, Washington, D. C. The sale 
publications are of three classes only — topo- 
graphical maps, geologic folios, and mono- 
graphs. 

The topographic maps are sold at the rate 
of five cents a sheet of standard size. For 100 
or more in one order, whether the same sheet 
or of different sheets, the price is two cents a 
sheet for the standard size. Special maps 
and those of larger size are sold at proportion- 
ate rates and on the same conditions of dis- 
count. Prepayment is required, and may be 
made by money order payable to the order of 
the Director of the United States Geological 
Survey, or in cash — the exact amount. 
Checks and postage stamps cannot be accept- 
ed. 

Geologic folios are usually twenty-five 
cents apiece, although ten of those issued 
have, on account of specially elaborate map 
work, sold for fifty cents. Only one, the 
geological folio that treats of Yellowstone 
Park, sells for seventy-five cents. These 
folios should be of interest to miners, pros- 
pectors, and land owners, and especially to 
teachers of geography or geology, and it is 
expected that there will be a growing demand 
for their use in schools. 

Monographs range in price from eighty 
cents to eleven dollars. The edition of one of 
the most elaborate, a ten dollar volume, has 
been exhausted. It was the work of Capt. 
C. E. Dutton, and was entitled "The Tertiary 
history of the Grand Canyon of Colorado." 
The subject naturally permitted great elabora- 
lon and grea: perfection ot detail in theiway 
of illustration, and these features brought up 
the price of the monograph. 

Full circulars descriptive of the publications 
and maps of the Geological Survey can be 
obtained on application to the Director, at 
Washington, D. C.| 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



CSS 

s 



NEWS FROM THE FIELD 




Supplied by our Regular Correspondents 



The Kansas Field. 




Chandte, Kansas, Nov. 22, 1903. 

The Kansas capitalists themselves are wak- 
ing up to importance of their own oil field. 
Hundreds of ivestors are seeking new leases, 
and are engaging well-digging outfits at a rate 
which is making things hum. They are "prov- 
ing" the field with a completeness that means 
eventual certainty as to its limits. 

An idea of the scope of this industry at 
present may be obtained from the statement 
of business done by the Prairies Oil and Gas 
company, the division of the Standard Oil 
company operating pipe lines in this new 
field. Reports are not availab'e without some 
delay, and the statement of production during 
the month of September has just been issued. 
This shows runs of oil from wells in the vari- 
ous districts as follows: 

Runs. 

District — Barrels. 

Neodesha, Kan , 9, 900.5* 

Cherryvale 705.29 

Chanute 82,850.2a 

Humboldt ", 743-50 

Peru : 4,930-83 

Independence 5,759-94 

Bartlesville, I. T 8,547.48 

Red Fo;k, 1. T , 274.37 



Total 114,712.16 

The production of this field has been stead- 
ily increasing since the first of the current 
year, and indications are that the best of it 
has not yet been discovered. It is only 
within the past few months that capital from 
the east has been interested and at the pre- 
sent time there is an influx of veteran oil 
operators from every district where oil has 
been produced. 

The following summary of statements for 
the first nine months of this year will convey 
an idea of the steady growth of the Industry. 
The pipe line company receives oil direct 
from receiving tanks on the farms under oper- 
ation, and in computing its statements, the 
barrel of forty two gallons is taken as a basis 
of computation. During the year 1902, the 
dally output of oil in the state averaged 
542.91 barrels, hence it will be seen that great 
strides are being made in the prosecution of 
work. This statement shows the monthly 
and daily average runs for this year: 

Months. . Runs. Average. 

January 44,528.47 1,436.40 

February 42,128.17 1,504.58 

April 27,168.06 905.60 

March 29,504.30 951.75 

Ma 7 f3,7°5-47 2,056.55 

]une 52,771.90 1,759.06 

J ul y • 60,421.74 1,949.09 

Au g ust 93,777-46 3,025.08 

September 114,712.16 3,823.73 

Total (barrels) 528,777.73 

The average price of oil per barrel in this 
field may be taken at $1.10 for the year, and 
upon this basis it is seen that the production 
of oil has already netted the sum of $58 1,655.50 
since the first of this year. 

The Mississippi lime is the end of things in 
this field. It is a peculiar geological forma- 
tion, generally known as the Mississippi flint, 
but the oil men have about figured it out thqt 
the sand lies upon this hard substance, and it 
has been clearly shown that when the lime is 
encountered all hope of getting a well may be 



abandoned. There' is no more oil in that 
lime than there vould be in a block of com- 
mon building stone. Some interesting tales 
are told of the contractors who first entered 
this field, and made agreements to drill wells 
to a certain depth. In some cases you can 
never tell at just what depth the lime may be 
encountered, and in certain instances it has 
been found very high. 

The best well in the state of Kansas is now 
credited to the Banks farm, five miles south- 
west of Independence, and as a producer of 
oil it certainly takes first rank. The last 
month has seen some surprising developments 
in the oleaginous situation here, but within 
the past ten days there has been a succession 
of surprises which will serve to convince the 
most skeptical that Kansas is really to be 
reckoned with as one of the leading factors in 
the petroleum industry. 

The Banks farm well, which is now attract- 
ing the greatest share of attention, was drilled 
by Rider & Smith, virtually the Elcho Oil 
company, the principal interest being held by 
the latter company. That it wi 1 ma e from 
400 to 500 barrels per day is the best judg- 
ment of the practical oil men who have seen 
it in operation. 

The Banks farm is located just west of and 
adjoining the Schoenberger, upon which the 
New York Oil and Gas company has secured 
two splendid producers. The well was drilled 
about 880 feet from the No. 1 Schoenberger, 
and was put down with a portable drilling 
machine. Sand was found at 1.150 feet, and 
31 feet of the producing formation was dis- 
covered. It started to flow when the pay was 
first tapped, and in twelve hours after the 
sand was reached it had made 10 inches of oil 
in a new 250-barrel tank, equivalent to thirty 
barrels. The natural flow promised to be 
quite large, but it was determined to give it a 
shot, and see what would be the result. After 
a portion of the eighty quarts had been placed 
in position the well bridged over, and Shooter 
C. H. Wasson had a very precarious job clean- 
ing out. During all this time the well was 
making periodical flows, and when the shot 
was finally put off, the fluid was standing 
within a few feet of the derrick floor. It 
threw a column of oil the height of the rig, 
and at once began to flow oil in a steady 
stream. Lead lines were connected and 
within a very short time the first tank was 
filled. 

An actual gauge of the production shows 
that a 250-barrel tank was filled in less than 
eleven hours, while almost the same amount 
was scattered on the ground adjacent to the 
well. Tankage facilities could not be pro- 
vided, and considerable of the oil was allowed 
to flow on the ground. 

Judging by the indications at present, the 
well can be rated as certainly good for 400 
barrels per day, and it Is quite probable that 
taking the entire production, it will make 
much better that 500 barrels. This oil is of a 
very good grade, rated at a price almost on a 
parallel with the product of northern Ohio. 

E. D. WARD. 



, Wyoming Letter. 

EVANSTON, WYO , NOV. 22, I9O3. 

The winter promises to witness some heavy 
deals in Uinta county oil lands. At the pre- 
sent time a party of wealthy easterners are 
figuring on scooping large tracts of oil lands 
in the various districts of the field. They 
figure that it is about time that owners of 
land in this field were tired of putting up 
money to retain their holdings and calculate 
that by coming in at this time they will se- 



cure rare bargains. However, they will find 
this a mistaken 1 ea, for the individual holders 
of land hereabouts have been up and doing 
ever since the inception of the field. 

Many wells have been sunk in the fields- 
radiating from Evanston and it is a matter of 
record that a great number of them are ready 
to contribute to the world's supply the mo 
ment their owners have secured all the adja- 
cent territory they want. Thousands of acres 
of oil lands have been located by different 
individuals and companies and much of this 
ground only awaits the magic touch of capi- 
tal to secure the fluid of which the world just 
now appears to be in need. There is every 
opportunity here for the profitable invest- 
ment of capital in oil lands. L- L. Bettys, 
manager of the Bettys Oil company, returned 
to the city Monday after an extended busi- 
ness trip to the New England states. He 
says that the investors of the east are organ- 
izing to invade our oil fields next summer. 
Let them come on; we need them. 

A. I. Anderson, who has been employed in 
the Spring Valley oil 'fields the past summer, 
spent a few days in the city this week. Mr. 
Anderson will shortly depart for California, 
where he will spend the winter with his fam- 
ily. He will return in the early spring and 
continue to labor in our fields, which he says 
carry brighter prospects than any new terri- 
tory in the country. 

The American Consolidated Oil company 
have ceased operations on all of their wells 
but one, that on section 15, 15-118, where 
work will cease as soon aa a discovery is 
made. This company now have three rigs In 
the Spring Valley field, and when work Is re- 
sumed in the early spring it is said that the 
concern will have ten strings of tools Indus- 
triously boring in the bowels of the earth. 

The Idaho- Wyoming well at Fossil is down 
1,430 feet, at which depth last Saturday the 
drill encountered sandstone, having passed 
through a strata of fire clay 125 feet thick. A 
fine prospect of oil was encountered in the 
sand rock, together with a good showing of 
gas. The Globe Oil company, who were 
drilling with a hydraulic rig, have changed to 
a Standard set of tools, as they were making 
too slow progress in a very hard formation. 
They have a very flattering prospect of both 
gas and oil, and have arranged to utilize the 
gas as fuel, thereby effecting a saving in coal. 
They expect to make speedy headway now 
and bring in a pay well before Christmas. 
This is a Beatrice, (Neb.) company, and 
many persons working for the Deemster 
Manufacturing company are numhertd among 
its stockholders. 

The Short well, down about 1,500 feet, is 
laying off waiting for a new cable, with very 
flattering prospects of another pay well be- 
fore Christmas. 

It is a significant fact that when expert oil 
men come to Uinta county to inspect our oil 
fields that they invariably cast their trained 
eyes in the vicinity of the Bettys well, a few 
miles south of town. What catches their eye 
so quickly is the lay of the formations in that 
particular locality. Here the formations are 
level and compact, and the surface indications 
are the same as those encountered in Spring 
Valley, where up to the present time the 
greatest amount of oil has been discovered. 
While the Bettys well has had to contend 
with a heavy water pressure, still this is in- 
dicative that when the oil sands are reached 
sufficient force will ensue to make a flowing 
well. The drill is now penetrating a forma- 
tion that is pleasing to the management, who 
expect good results shortly. The well is now 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



down about 1,000 feet, a fair depth when the 
obstacles the company has had to contend 
with are considered. It Is now a common 
saying among oil men that the precious article 
will surely be found in the Bettys well. All 
that the members of this company need is the 
exercise of that rare article — patience. True, 
they have held up well under a hard strain, 
but the old adage now promises to be fulfilled, 
''good things come to him who a aits." 

A. A. Perkins, of the Michigan-Wyoming 
Oil company, returned to the city this week 
from the east, but being indisposed will not 
take a very active part in business matters for 
the present. 

On Wednesday the Standard-Reserve Oil 
company struck a heavy flow of oil on the N 
E \ of Sec. 12, 15-118, at a depth of 800 feet. 
The oil is that same high grade which our 
field is noted for producing and the fact that 
it was encountered at so short a distance 
under ground is hlgely encouraging. This 
company is prepared to drill all winter and 
will erect another derrick soon. This strike 
was made on the same section upon which 
the Jager people brought in a producing well. 



The Alaska Field. 



An exchange says: "The only oil district 
in Alaska that has passed beyond the pro- 
blematical stage is Kayak, although Cook's 
Inlet and Cold Bay will doubtless develop 
Into producing points by the end of the com- 
ing season. 

" The Kayak district extends along the 
southern coast of Alaska for a distance of 
seventy miles and from two to ten miles in 
width, in which district there are hundreds of 
oil seepages, some of them yielding more than 
a hundren gallons of pure petroleum oil a day. 
One peculiarity of these seepages Is, that no 
flow of water accompanies the oil. In many 
places large deposits of brea is found which 
is practically pure paraffine; this oil having a 
paraffine base. The brea Is used freely for 
fuel in drilling. In general topography the 
country about Kayak is slightly rolling with a 
few scattered hills, ranging from one to five 
hundred feet in height, and a line of foot hills 
lying near the glaciers rise to a height of 
several thousand feet. 

"The geological formation of the country is 
broken and irregular, showing signs of violent 
eruption, deeply marked by glacial action. 
Light gray shale and slate cover the region 
where the oil seepages appear. This shale 
formation ends west of the Kostrakral lake, 
which is considered the limit of the oil belt. 
•' At the present time there are three pro- 
ducing wells in the district, which were dev- 
eloped by the Alaska Development company 
this season. The company state they are now 
in a position to deliver 1000 barrels daily. 
Many other wells are being put down and 
numerous rigs are being shipped into the 
field. 

"Analysis of the oil taken from one of the 
wells of the Alaska Development company is 
as follows: 

"Specific gravity at 60° F 45-9° " 

From 60° to 150 F„ Naptha sS-Soi'o 

From 150° to 240° F., Illuminating Oil 3>-oo° ' 

From 285° to 320 F., Rubricating Oil 21.50% 

Paraffine, Residue and Loss 9.00% 



dollars will be expended In development 
work. From recent reports three fair wells 
have been brought in in the district, yielding 
a superior paraffine oil but that does not mean 
that all the country within a thousand miles 
Is "oil land." The "land hog" has already 
ha« his day in this new field and Is prepared 
to offer the Investing public anywhere from 
ten to a hundred thousand acres of " proven 
oil land" at any figure to suit the purchaser. 
There are many sound companies going to 
Kyack, many of them representing individual 
capital, but fake companies, prodigies of the 
" land hog," will predominate, and the people 
are waiting and anxious to be swindled. 

Will Pipe Line Suspend? 

The Fresno Democrat is responsible for the 
following: 

From a reliable source this morning it was 
learned that the pipe line from the Kern oil 
fields to Point Richmond will be shut down on 
December 1st. It was stated that notice has 
been given to the employees of the company 
that their services will not be needed for an 
Indefinite period, except that a few men will 
be kept to look after the property. At Cor- 
coran, for instarce, only two men will be re- 
tained. The report further stated that the 
Coalinga field will not be affected. E. R. 
Smith, the contractor who constructed the 
buildings along the pipe Hne ; was interviewed 
regarding the report, and said he knew of no 
order to close down the line. He added that 
If such an order has been given, it will be 
temporary In effect, and caused by the lack of 
storage capacity. The output of the Coalinga 
section, he said, is in fact enough to supply 
the pipe line. Add to this the fact that the 
refining capacity at Point Richmond is suffi- 
cient to care for the oil that comes through 
the big pipe, and the situation can be better 
appreciated. It may therefore be taken as 
assured that the shut down, if the report 
proves to be true, will cover only part of the 
field, and that operations will be resumed as 
soon as storage capacity can be provided. 
Storage reservoirs are under construction in 
Kern county, one that is under way being 
about seventeen feet deep and covering five 
acres. There is little opportunity for storage 
at Point Richmond, as the cost of tanks is too 
large, and it is much cheaper to store at the 
oil fields. 



in consumption overproduction for the month 
of 144,723 barrels. The slock of Pennsyl- 
vania crude oil is now at the lowest point for 
nearly ten years— 5,862,887 barrels. The de- 
crease in production in August was 249,262 
barrels. In the Ohio and Indiana field, where 
a lower grade of oil is produced, worth nearly 
50 cents per barrel less than Pennsylvania 
crude, the production is incressing, reaching 
an output of 60,666 barrels per day during 
September, the largest daily production in 
seven years.— Bonds and Mortgages. 

Pipe Line a Failure. 



" In the three completed wells oil has been 
encountered at a very shallow depth, the first 
well being finished at 365 feet. 

It Is probable that thousands of fortune 
seekers will go into the Kayak oil field the 
coming season and hundreds of thousands of 



Publicity is now being given to the fact that 
the pipe line from Bakersfield to Point Rich- 
mond Is a failure. After repeated attempts to 
get the oil through the line it has been aban- 
doned and in the future will carry nothing 
but Coalinga oil. It looks very much as if 
the refinery is at Ihe wrong end of the line 
and so fai as can be seen the millions of bar- 
rels of oil in the tanks near Bakersfield will 
have to be transported by rail— or not at all. 
The trouble seems to have been that the sand 
in the oil, already heavy with asphaltum, 
clogs the pipe and the Standard are now buy- 
ing distillate to clean them out. There seems 
a strong possibility that the Standard may 
build a refinery at Bakersfield. 



Fear an Oil Shortage. 

John D. Rockefeller and other leading In- 
terests in the Standard Oil company are re- 
ported on good authority to be much alarmed 
over the fact that the production of crude oil 
in the Pennsylvania field has fallen far below 
the consumption. The price of the crude 
product has been increased in the hope of 
spurring on independent operators to explore 
new fields, and the Standard itself is making 
a diligent search for fresh sources of supply. 
In spite of these efforts the surplus stock in 
two years has been decreased by 6,000,000 
barrels, and some of the trust officials begin to 
fear an exhaustion of the oil fields oi America. 
Incidentally it may be noted that the shares 
of the great trust, although paying dividends 
of 40 to 50 per cent a year, have fallen off 
more than 200 points. The Standard Oil 
company is doing everything possible to 
stimulate production, but cannot get the oil, 
for while fifty new wells were drilled in 
Pennsylvania and West Virginia every day 
during the month of September, the increased 
production was nowhere nearly sufficient to 
meet the demands. The result was an excess 



We manufacture the best 
lubricating oils for oil 
drillers 

KING KEYSTONE OIL CO., 

116 Front St., San Francisco. 



FOR SALE 

A complete oil well drilling 
outfit near Huntington, Ore- 
gon. Inventory and price 
on application to . 

H. V. GATES, Hillsboro, Oregon. 



PACIFIC Oil, REPORTER 



Sndian Petroleum Land Bill. 



A movement has been undertaken among 
representative in congress from the southwest 
to simplify the present laws with regard to 
the leasing of lands by the five civilized 
tribes of the Indian territory, especially for 
the purpose of petroleum production. The 
controversies that have arisen within the past 
year between the officials of the interior de- 
partment and prospectors for oil and other 
minerals haye been described in these dis- 
patches from time to time, and the matter has 
attracted general attention in the petroleum 
trade. Conditions with regard to the lands 
of the Cherokee Indians are more satisfactory 
than those surrounding the allotments of the 
Choctaws and Chickasaws, who are on a 
somewhat different footing through the diver- 
sity of legislation under which the Indians 
have been authorized to receive their lands in 
severalty. 

One of the most serious difficulties en- 
countered by parties desiring to lease the 
lands of the Chickasaws and the Choctaws 
has been the complicated character of the 
laws with regard to the holcings of minors. 
The existing statutes prescribe a method for 
the appointment of guardians and for the ap- 
proval by the courts of the acts of such guar- 
dians, but in practice this procedure is said to 
have been clearly shown to have been im- 
practicable. With a view to providing a 
a plain, simple code which would obviate the 
difficulties to be encountered under the pre- 
sent laws, Representative Stephens, of Texas, 
has drafted and introduced a bill which has 
been referred to the committee on Indian 
affairs. The principal provisions of the bill 
are as follows: 

"Be it enacted, etc., That any member of 
the tribes of Choctaw or Chickasaw Indians, 
after he or she shall have selected his or her 
allotment according to law, for the purpose of 
developing the mineral existing upon or be- 
neath the same, shall be authorized in writing 
to lease the said allotment or any portion 
thereof for mining purposes for a period not 
to exceed thirty years from date of lease and 
for a reasonable rental of royalty, to be actu- 
ally paid at such times as may be agreed upon 
by the lessor and lessee. 

"Sec. 2. That any lessee, his associates or 
assigns, mining under lease made pursuant to 
section numbered one of the act shall pay to 
the allottee, his heirs, legal representatives, 
or assigns, full compensation for all dangers to 
the surface of the land or improvements situ- 
ated thereon; and if the lessor and lessee 
cannot agree upon the amount of such dam- 
age then the judge of the United States court 
of the district where said leased premises are 
situated, upon application of the lessor or 
lessee, shall appoint three disinterested ap- 
praisers to assess such damages, each of whom 
before entering upon the performance of his 
duties shall take an oath to faithfully and 
impartially discharge his duty and true award 
make according to evidence. Said appraisers, 
after giving lessor and lessee ten days previous 
time thereof in writing, shall, at a time and 
place to be by them designated, proceed to 
hear evidence as to the damages to which the 
allottee, his heirs or assigns, are entitled, and 
within five days after they have decided upon 
the amount of such damages shall file their 
written decision or award, together wi'h the 
evidence by them heard, with the clerk of 
said court. If either the lessor or lessee shall 
be dissatisfied with the decision of said ap- 
praisers he shall haye the right at any time 
within ten days from the date of filing the 



same with the clerk, as herein provided, to ap- 
peal from such decision directly to the .United 
States court of the distriefc where said prem- 
ises are situated by serving the adverse party 
with written notice that he has appealed from 
said decision to said court; and if an appeal 
be taken the cause shall be docketed and tried 
in said court as other cases; and if either 
party feel agrieved at the decision of said 
court he shall have the right to appeal there- 
from as appeals under the law are , taken in 
other cases: Provided, however, That the 
lessee by depositing with the clerk of said 
court the amount of damages so ■ assessed by 
the appraisers shall be authorized to appro- 
priate the surface of said land and improve- 
ments necessary for mining purposes, as 
aforesaid, notwithstanding said appeal. If, 
upon appeal from said appraisers or from the 
court, the amount of damages assessed by the 
appraisers or by said court, or a jury, shall be 
increased then the appellee shall pay the 
costs of such appeal, but if the amount of 
damages be reduced then the costs of appeal 
shall be paid by the appellant. Said ap- 
praisers while actually engaged in the dis- 
charge of their duties each shall receive $3 
per day, to be paid by the party who seeks 
to appropriate said land as aforesaid." 

"Sec. 3. That exclusive probate jurisdic- 
tion over the estates of the deceased Choctaw 
and Chickasaw Indians, and the estates of 
male members of the tribe of Choctaw and 
Chichasaw Indians under the age of twenty- 
one years, and female members thereof under 
the age of eighteen years, is heaeby conferred 
upon the United States court of the district 
where said estates or a portion thereof are 
situated; and as to said minor members of the 
tribe of Choctaw and Chickasaw Indians and 
their estates and the estates of deceased mem- 
bers of . said tribes, chapter one, entitled 
' Adminlstrarion,' and chapter forty-nine, en- 
titled ' Descent and distribution,' and chapter 
seventy-three, entitled 'Guardians, curators 
and wards,' of Mansfields Digest of the Stat- 
utes of Arkansas, eighteen hundred and 
eighty-four, is hereby adopted and put in 
force in the Indian Territory. 

"Sec. 4. That exclusive jurisdiction is 
hereby expressly conferred upon the United 
States courts in the Indian Territory in all 
controversies arising between members of any 
of the Five Civilized Tribes; between mem- 
bers of said tribes and citizens of the Unitep 
States, and other persons or corporations, and 
of all controversies of whatsoever kind and 
character, both civil and criminal, regardless 
of the nationality of the parties thereto. 

" Sec. 5. That all laws or parts of laws in 
conflict with the provisions of this act are 
hereby repealed." 

Mr. Stephens will have a hearing on his 
measure at an early date, and it is probable 
that the committee will call upon the Secre- 
tary of the Interior for an expression of his 
views as to tne merits of the bill. The de- 
partment is disposed to take a very conserva- 
tive view of these matters and ' will be in no 
hurry to approve newly projectee legislation, 
but the present chaotic condition of affairs is 
fully recognized and it is probable that legis- 
lation of some kind will result from the move- 
ment undertaken by Mr. Stephens, which has 
the support of a number of his colleagues who 
are familiar with conditions in the Indian 
Territory. 

In answering advertisements, our readers 
will confer a favor on us by stating that they 
saw the advertisement in the Pacific On, 
Reporter. 



Natural Gas at Stockton. 



At the window glass works, Stockton, a 
large flow of natural gas has been struck at a 
depth of 2,300 feet, and another well will be 
sunk in the same locality to supply the plant 
with fuel for its furnaGes. The well just fin- 
ished furnishes 75,000 cubic feet of gas every 
twenty-four hours and is next to the largest 
gas producer here. Fuel gas is worth $1 a 
1,000 feet and the daily flow of the well saves 
the plant $75. Another well of the same capa- 
city will supply sufficient fuel for the full 
operation of the glass works. 

Analysis of the gas at Stockton shows a 
small amount of heavy hydro-carbon present, 
Indicating that the gas came from the decom- 
position of petroleum oil and not from the 
decomposition of vegetation; in fact in drill- 
ing the well, vegetation is not encountered in 
sufficient quantity to produce any large flow 
of gas. If it comes from the decomposition of 
petroleum, as stated above, somewhere in the 
formation which underlies Stockton, petroleum 
oil should exist. Natural gas being found at 
Hanford, near Merced, at Stockton, Sacra- 
mento, Uba City, Tuscan Springs, near Sykes, 
Shoshone, Byron Springs and numerous other 
places, would indicate the entire great valley 
of California, consisting of the Sacramento 
and San Joaquin valleys, is underlaid by a 
strata containing natural gas. 

The Electric Road. 



The Los Angeles Herald says that the 
Bakersfield-Ventura road has cut off all 
negotiation with the outside contractors and 
will build its line fiom the San Joaquin to the 
ocean without the usual construction company 
having a hand in the work. 

The engineer corps of the road will have 
the entire charge of the line and Chief Engi- 
neer Purcell is now in Chicago purchasing 
materials and cars. As fast as the cars can be 
secured they will be loaded with the com- 
pany's building materials and sent to the 
coast. 

According to the statements of Major 
Russell, the company's plans are well matured 
and the first cars loaded with the materials 
for the new road will arrive here about the 
first of the next month and from that time 
track-laying will be rushed. As soon as the 
first part of the road is built it is calculated 
that the road will pay something, as it is 
through an oil-producing territory and the oil 
will be shipped to the coast over the new 
line. 

The company's men have gone so far that 
they have calculated just how long it will 
take the trains to make the run from the 
valley to the coast, and the new line will be 
equipped with the latest motors and cars so 
that the best possible time can be made. 

Oil in Alaska. 



D. H McMillan, of Pittsburg, mining en. 
gineer and oil expert, is in Seattle on his way 
to Kavak, where he will superintend the 
drilling of an oil well upon property con- 
trolled by a syndicate of which Clarence Cun- 
ningham is the chief figure. Mr. McMillan 
will sail for the North next Tuesday. The 
drilling plant for driving the experimental 
well has been shipped from Pittsburg, and is 
expected here daily. 

Mr. McMillon will take with him to Kayak 
four experienced oil well drillers, and as soon 
as the boring plant is set up the work will be 
pushed day and night. The parties back of 
the enterprise own a large quantity of land in 
the oil district. 



^--— — ■ - — 

Developments in the 
Districts. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 






The Sonr Like News says The Parafine 
Oil company has brought in a good flowing 
well on the F. H. Green tract in the western 
part of this county and near the Liberty 
county line, and en what is known as Batsons 
Prairie. 

The well came in last Saturday and is said 
to be good for abont 1000 barrels a day. 
Little & Mitchell, the well-known oil drillers, 
drilled this well, and it is said that they were 
paid regular drillers' wages while putting 
down the well, and were each to receive fif- 
teen acresof land out of the F. H. C.reen tract 
contiguous to the Parafine company's well in 
the event it came in as a producing well. 

The Parafine well Is about seven miles west 
of Sarataga, eighteen miles northeast of 
Liberty, and about fifteen miles northwest of 
Sour Lake. 

People have long since gone wild over the 
coming in of the well, much the same as they 
went wild over the coming in of the Lucas 
gusher at Beaumont and the Roche gusher at 
this place, and from all directions they have 
been pouring in to Batsons Prairie "to see the 
well and talk over matters." As a result ol 
this excitement, as might have been expect- 
ed, land values have climbed way up yonder. 
Batsons Prairie land could have been pur- 
chased a few weeks ago at five and ten dollars 
the acre, and it is hard to tell what the same 
acreage will bring today, and it may command 
even a higher price tomorrow. The coming 
in of a new gusher is to the average oil man 
what the coming to town of the same old 
circus is to the average small boy. It is 
" something new " every time it happens, 
notwithstanding it Is the same all the time. 

It is said that this well was drilled at the 
instance of Mr. W. L. Douglas, it was a wild- 
cat proposition from the beginning, and it was 
all to gain with nothing to lose but the cost of 
the well, as the land was cheap at the prices 
which it commanded before the advent of a 
gusher. 

Batsons Prairie is now the very hub of 
excitement, and we have it on pretty 
good authority that several saloons and 
restaurants have sprung into existence on thst 
erstwhile barren plain where cows and Texas 
ponies grazed by day, and where bear, pan- 
ther and wolves prowled by night. It was 
changed into a veritable scene of wild specula- 
tion in a presto-like manner. 

Readers of the Oil News will remember 
seeing an interview in its columns several 
weeks ago with Col. I. N. Dark, a veteran 
surveyor in this section. At the time Col. 
Dark mentioned the fact that drilling was 
either under headway or would be begun on 
Batsons Prairie, and he inclined to the belief 
that the drillers would be rewarded by the 
finding of oil. Col. Dark has a letter in 
another column of today's Oil News in which 
he referred to an extensive gas belt. 

The coming in of the well of the Paraffine 
Oil company is not to be credited to one town 
more than another. It was simply the judg- 
ment of Mr. Douglas, based on surface indica- 
tions, that oil would be found on Batsons 
Prairie right where the well was put down 
Colonel William Wiess, of Beaumont, is also 
interested in the company. It will benefit 
every town in this entire section, ami we only 
hope that the price of oil will advance to a 
point which will inspire men with msans to 
prospect for oil. Some of the parties oper- 
ating in this field have gone to Batsons Prairie 
in fact Little & Mitchell who drilled the well 



New T«xa« went from Sonr Lake to that pltce, the same 
as they carat from Beaumont to Sour Lake, 
J and the same as they will go from Batsons 
i Prairie to some other place. The coming in 
of this well does not mean the death of Sour 
Lake or Beaumont, but to the contrary means 
that both pieces will be largely benefitted. 

Batsons Prairie is some distance removed 
from the railroad, and it is very probable that 
pipe lines will be laid to that field as a means 
of handling the oil. The new well Is 685 feet 
deep. 

It is claimed the oil on Batsons Prairie is 
lighter than the Sour Lake or Beamont oils, 
but we cannot vouchsafe the claim. 



Makes Water Burn. 



The Los Angeles Express has the following 
account of a most remarkable discovery: 

Crude oil has served many purposes since 
scientists have worked with the product, but 
thus far no attempt has been made to produce 
flames from the water held In solution in 
petroleum until William C. Dillon of Los 
Angeles entered the experimental stage. 

Mr. Dillon was not seeking to construct a 
water-burning machine when he began his 
experiments; his self-appointed task was to 
make cheap gas. He has just received patent 
papers for his invention with which he is en- 
abled to make gas for 6 cents a thousand, 
according to the result of tests made with a 
miniature machine now in operation at his 
shop on Requena street. 

In the process the inventor does not force 
the oil into a white hot oven as in other gas- 
making processes. Instead he Insists the 
volatile action of the petroleum merely by 
heating the product. That crude oil in a 
heated state gives off a strong gas sufficient to 
hoist a man with a lantern over a derrick, is 
known to the friends of several oil men who 
have been careless while steaming their field 
tanks. None but Mr. Dillon thought of using 
the heating method of extracting the gas. 

About fifteen years ago Mr. Dillon, then at 
Denver, first conceived the process for mak- 
ing cheap gas. He was connected with the 
Standard Oil company at the time and made 
gas in a machine he constructed, by building 
a fire under a cylinder wherein was another 
cylinder containing the gasoline. However, 
insurance agents tabooed the neighborhood 
where experiments were being made and the 
inventor temporarily ceased his labors. Mr. 
Dillon did not take up the work of perfecting 
his machine until he came ta California, and 



gas to make a good 1 itla the fresh air 

you forced in there. You can't do it again, 
though." 

Whereupon Mr. Dillon an.! his assistant 
proceeded to "do it agni r,ve times, 

turning fresh air Into gas merely by forcing 
It into the receiver, which seemed to contain 
nothing but water. It wts done to the 
amazement of all present, and as the machine 
stood upon solid ground out of doors It was 
plain to be seen that it had nothing up Its 
sleeve. 

"I really do not understand it myself," said 
Mr. Dillon, In discussing his machine. "I 
know I can make r.ooo feet of pure gas con- 
taining great heat from one gallon of crude 
oil. The action of the water In supplying 
illuminating power to air is something which 
is beyond me or any chemist to whom I have 
submitted samples of the water. Of course, 
the g* s In filtering through the water, car- 
bonizes it, but why the fluid should proceed 
to multiply the original quantity 150 times is 
something which I am going to find out as 
soon as certain machinery can be secured from 
the east with which to make a proper test. 

"Another strange fact is that, after running 
gas into the receiver, I am able to draw out 
the water and burn it like oil. The cost of 
producing gas from a small amount of crude 
oil and a large amount of air Is lessened 
through the fact that the residue left in the 
cylinder can be taken out and used as fuel 
oil. The heating process does not seem to 
injure petroleum as much as a fuel. I also 
can use gasoline and distillate as successfully 
and as cheaply to secure gas from the ma- 
chine. The heat of the gas obtained is 
strong. I have run a machine in the shop 
with this little apparatus." 

In appearance the machine is little more 
than a tight cylinder inclosed within an outer 
cylinder. The inner receptacle holds the oil 
or gasoline from which the gas is produced. 
It has intake pipes for automatic oil feed and 
outlet for the gas into a gas-holder. Between 
the inner and outer cylinders is a water- 
jacket, provided with safety valves and auto- 



A series of burners ex- 
the outer cylinder, and 



now has secured patents covering what he 
believes to be a successful gas-maker In every 
respect. 

During a demonstration today Mr. Dillon's 
machine astounded those who were invited to 
inspect it. A gallon of crude oil, worth about 
2 cents, had been heated, the gaseous elements 
passing into a miniature gas tank, through 
water which floated the lift, after the manner 
of all gas receivers. Then the fire under the 
crude oil was put out and the cylinders grew 
cold. The gas was turned on and lighted. It 
butned with a pure yellow flame of strong 
heat. 

However, the strange part of the demon- 
stration followed. After the gas had been 
exhausted, air was forced Into the tank by 
means of a fan. The list floated, and when 
the air had filled the receiver the gas line 
again was opened and proceeded to give forth 
gas which burned as brightly as the original 
illuminant. 

"Huh," remarked a gas man who was pre- 
sent. "The water naturally gave up sufficient 



mafic water feed, 
tend along under 

these heat the water, which in turn boils the 
oil or gasoline of the inner tank, producing 
the gas. The latter is said to be non-poison- 
ous, as experiments with animals demonstrate. 



WHdcatting in Texas. 



Since the decrease in the production of the 
Sour Lake field many wildcat projects have 
been given birth, and some are now under 
full headway. The latest proposition in this 
line is on a more extensive scale than any of 
the others, and involves a big tract of un- 
proven territory known as the Turnbow 
league. This property is situated about one 
and one-half miles north of Sour Lake and 
extends half way to Saratoga. The land is 
covered with oil lakes, gas mounds, asphalt 
beds, tar wells and has all indications of oil 
that are found in the Sour Lake field proper. 
It Is traversed by three pipe lines, which run 
from Sour Lake to Saratoga, and arrangements 
have been made for the pipe line companies 
to handle the production if oil Is found. A 
contract has been made for the development 
of 5,000 acres belonging to Turnbow brothers. 
Five test wells are to be sunk on different 
parts of the tract and work Is to be begun at 
once. 



Pacific Oil Reporter is $2.50 per year. 



PACIFIC Olt REPORTS* 



THE LATEST OIL NEWS. 



Recent Developments Which Have Made Oil One of the 
Greatest Industries in the Far West- 



Halt Moon Bay. 

The eastern trip of Mr. J. E. Kerr in 
the interests of the Wisconsin Gold Bond 
Oil company has been successful and 
upon the return of Mr. Kerr to Cali- 
fornia, work v ill be resumed and the 
well pushed to completion. 

The Duchess Oil company will 
shortly be actively at work in this field 
as arrangements have been made in the 
east for the most advantageous com- 
pletion of this company's development. 
Kern. 
The repDrt that the Standard is about 
to shut down its pipe line from Kern 
River to Point Richmond is attracting 
much attention among oil men. While 
the report is not positively confirmed 
there is reason for believing that it may 
have much foundation in fact. If the 
shut-down comes it will be only tempor- 
ary and affect simply the one from 
Mendota south. The Coalinga oil is 
much easier to pump then the heavy 
product of Kern River and the com- 
pany is much over-stTCked at the for- 
mer field. As the expenses of hauling 
from Coalinga fo Point Richmond by 
rail is about the same as from Kern 
River, it is thought that the company 
will use the pipe line for sometime ex- 
clusively for relieving the situation at 
Coalinga, holding much of the Kern 
River oil at the field until later and ship- 
ping only what is necessary by rail. 

The Associated Oil company's new 
hall at the Kern River field was recently 
the scene of a very enjoyable basket 
social. It was one of the first social 
affairs to be given in the new building 
and the room was filled with people and 
a large overflow lingered about the out- 
side enjoying the fun and the program 
through the open windows. The social 
was gotten up by a coram itte c onsisting 
of Mrs. Thorn, Mrs. Weldon, Mrs. 
Hutchinson and Mrs. Futhey and pro- 
ceeds were for the benefit of church and 
Sunday school work in the Kern River 
fields. The lunch boxes were prepared 
by the ladies and were sold at auction to 
the gentlemen present. The auctioneer 
was a master hand, and the bidders 
were_ in a liberal mood, with the result 
that many of the boxes were sold for 
f 4 or f 5 and some six or eight brought 
$6 apiece. The bidding, as may be 
imagined, was spirited, and much mer- 
riment was produced. One gentleman, 
whose name was not learned, set a mini- 
mum price of 75 cents on the boxes and 
started each one at that figure. En- 
gineer Weldon, who was on duty at the 
time, left his work for a few minutes oc- 
casionally and succeeded in bidding in a 
number of choice lunches through the 
window. 

Santa Barbara. 

A number of San Francisco capitalists 
have just concluded a deal with Alfonso 
I/. Den, for the lease of his property, a 
portion of the Rincon rancho, consisting 
of several hundred acres, situated on the 
coast, ten miles west of this city, It is 
proposed to commence oil development 
work on a large scale at once. 

The deal is an important one and will 
open a territory of Santa Barbara county 
upon which no development work has 
been attempted. The property is near 
the largest asphalt mine in the world, 
which was closed down by the trust 
some time ago. 

Santa Maria. 

The Graciosa company is drilling on 
well No, 3 and is meeting with good 



success. The property belongs to Cap- 
tain Harris and has one well in oil. 

The California Coast company is down 
over 500 feet and the indications for oii 
are excellent. 

Operations by the Hall company will 
be resumed shortly after an idleness of 
several weeks. The company started to 
sink a well on the Kaiser property. 

The drillers of Brookshire are down 
about 700 feet and the formation is 
identical with the Pinal company's well 
No. 4. It is almost certain that this 
company will stiike oil. 

Mr. Elliot, who has been operating In 
Cat canyon on the William Rice place 
left for Los Angeles on Wednesday to 
bring up a Standard rig which his com- 
pany has purchased. Drilling will be- 
gin at once when he arrives. 

The Santa Ma-ia Oil and Gas com- 
pany, one of the oldest operators in the 
field, is now down to a depth of about 
2,000 feet and has excellent indications 
of oil. The well is located about a mile 
from the first hole sunk. Mr. Squier 
has charge of the drilling. 

The derrick for well No. 18 6f the 
Western Union has been completed and 
spudding will begin in a day or so. On 
well No. 17 tbe perforated casing has 
been put in and the well is being gotten 
into shape for producing. No. 6, which 
recently suffered somewhat from the 
effects of an earthquake, is being put 
into first-class order and will be among 
the producers shortly. 

The Union company has completed its 
tank and pipe line and at once put the 
same to practical use. On account of a 
break in the pipe the company lost con- 
siderable oil. Since the break has been 
repaired the line is working fine and the 
oil conveyed without difficulty. The 
work of laying the pipe line from Harris 
station where the oil is pumped across 
the divide from the Lompoc wells be- 
gan in mediately and will be pushed to 
completion as rapidly as possible. The 
company's well No. 2 is down about 
1,000 feet with indicat'ons that insure 
another good well. 

The Pinal company has at last signed 
up the contract for the delivery to the 
Standard company of 120,003 barrels of 
oil, delivery to begin just as soon as the 
Standard's tank at Port Harford is com- 
pleted which at the most will be in 
thirty days. The Pinal company at 
present is most seriously handicapped 
for storage room and it will be a great 
relief to get the great volume of oil out 
of the way. Wells No. 1 and 4 are com- 
pleted and are fine producers. No. 1 
while being tested flowed 250 bar'els in 
two hours. The derrick for No. 5 will 
be completed in a few days. 
Ventura. 
It will not be many months before 
Ventura, and Oxnard also, will have na- 
tural gas piped into the houses of the 
two towns In an interview with E. P. 
Foster Thnrsday that gentleman told a 
Free Press representative that the pipes 
and all other material necessary to esta- 
blish the gas plant had already been 
ordered and was on the way to Ventura 
and would reach here at any time. The 
plant ordered will be an up-to-date one 
in every particular. It is what is known 
as a high pressure system. That is, the 
gas is run through the pipes under 
pressure there being attachments by 
which the flow is equalized, so that it 
reaches high and low places under ex- 
actly the same pressure. With this 



system, the gas being carried through 
the best of wrought-iron pipes, Ventura 
consumers will 'get the very best in the 
way of a gas supply. It is not known 
just when the material for the plant w"ill 
arrive here, nor when the work may be 
begun on the installation of the plant, 
but it will be begun as soon as possible, 
' s plans are all ready for the beginning 
at any time. The plans have been pre- 
pared by Mr. McKay, the gas expert of 
the Edison company, who has exa- 
mined thoroughly into the prospects of 
the Ventura people. He announces that 



they have enough gas for Ventura and 
that the supply is on the increase, and 
that the town will have the best system 
that can be furnished. It is not known 
how long it will take to install the new 
plant after work is begun upon it, but 
Mr. Foster thinks only a very few 
menths. The gas outflow at the wells is 
on the increase. Besides, the deep well 
the company is sinking, continues to 
show encouraging signs. It is now 
down 400 feet and has opened four 
stratas of gas, each with a fine flow. The 



ast strata was struck only a few day 



Private Rooms 



Phone Main 5966 



Jules Wittmann 



Jules' Restaurant 



Regular Dinner with wine, 75c. 
Sundays and Holidays, $1.00. 



315 317=319=321 323 

Pine St,. S. F. 



Open Evenings 
Music Sundays 




FOR SALE 



IN 

KERN RIVER, Cheap 

Section 2, 29-28. 

Shaded portion map shows 40 acres three-fourths mile east of 
DISCOVERY WELL. U. S. Patent 22 years. EASY TERMS. 
Cheapest in Kern River. Write at once. 

WESTERN R. 1, CO., 

Room 36 Chronicle BIdg., 

San Francisco. 



THE NATIONAL SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

Oil Well Supplies 
Drilling and 
Fishing Tools 

Fitter CabtesHbest in the world 

We carry in stock heavy 7$4-in., 55-6-in. and 
4^-in. Boston Casing, in addition to all the 
standard sizes and weights. 6-ln., 8-in. and 
10-ln. Boston Drive Pipe always on hand, 

Pacific Coast Headquarters 

117 North Main Street 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Branches: 

Bakersfield and McKlttrick, al. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ago and the t.ols arc now in sandstone 
firing encouraging gas signs. M 
ter says that tbil well now yield* as 
much as has been already developed in 
the other wells and that going to Uxnard 
with the gas is a certainty. Work will 
be continued in the deep well nntil it is 
not possible to go deeper and as long as 
gas signs keep up as they h.ive thus far. 

Coalinga Letter. 
Coaxing*, Nc^ 

Maine State is aggressively at work on 



! miles in length, and as far as can be as- 
certained, it is expressly constructed for 
, the company's own product: 

The last well that has been pumped 

by means of a jack on the west side, is ' 

'.ClurgS; Clay pool. It has 

been changed back to be pumped with 

the beam. It has teen repeatedly 

demonstrated by various companies that 

the production can be increased from V 

by pumping a well with the beam 

instead of jacks. 

The deepening of wells in the section 



work on another drilling it to the deep dwelling will be put up; a water -well ia 
sand. 



The Peerless Oil company began 
drilling on its first well.cn section la, 
the past week. 

Section Seven Oil company's well N\> 
I continues in its prodig mous production 
averaging more than 1,200 barrels per 
day. Kver since it was tubed and 
packed, the Ho • has been steady with- 
out any indication of lessening the flow. 
in fict, the production is rather on the 
increase than a decline. The manage- 



cow being drilled, and other additions 
and improvements will be made when 
the present plans have been carried out. 
Mercantile Crude company's No. 3 
well has been perforated. The indica- 
tions bid fuir to briug in a la-ge produc- 
tion. Within a few days the well will 
be in condition to show its production. 
This company has already a production 
of 4,000 b-rrels per uiiutb from its two 
wells. 

After deepening well No. 3 of the 




Well No. 1 Jagar Oil Company, Wyoming 



rigs Nos. 7 and 8, to be ready for spud- 
ding when No. 6 is 6nished. 

Commercial Petroleum company is at 
woik on the fifth rig, to be ready for 
drilling when one of the present drilling 
wells is completed 

J. D. Pillsbury has also bought the 
SEX of section 2, ai-15, which makes 
him the possessor of the the entire SJ£ 
of this section. 

The Un'on pipe line, running from 
Oro Station to seciton 13, is nearing com- 
pletion. The line is approximately four 



28 district is becoming quite common of 
late, as a resjlt of penetrating the 
deeper sand and demonstrating its pro- 
ductiveness. The California Oilfields 
Limited was the first company to deepen 
a well, which resulted in bringing in a 
gusher. Twenty-eight Oil company 
deepened its No. 8, which is now produc- 
ing from 250 to 300 barrels. It is mak- 
ing preparations to deepen another. Oil 
City Petroleum company one of its wells 
rigged up for the purpose of deepening 
It, and California Oilfields Limited is at 



ment is endeavoring to gel No. 2 started 
after considerable delay waiting for a 
packer. 

The Pleasant Valley Stock company 
and the Union Oil company have each 
erected a tank-house for two 1,000-bar- 
rel tanks. The Jvlzumo Pino company is 
having lumber hauled for the same 
purpose. 

The California Oilfields Limited is 
about to erect a spacious storehouse in 
town. It has already put in a switch for 
a private sidetrack. In addition, a 



Caribou Oil company, the production 
was increased from less than 100 barrels 
to nearly 300 by this well. In conse- 
quence of the magnificient result, No. 2 
will be deepened at once. 

The Chicago Consolidated Oil com- 
pany has indefinitely suspended opera- 
tions, after drilling one of the deepest 
holes in the field. Just what the com- 
pany's plans for the future are is not 
known. Besides the drilling rig which 
has been in use there is another rig on 



Continued on Page Fourteen. 



The 

Name 

Determines 

the 

Quality 



FITLER'S § Oil Well Supply Co/s 

— m 



DRILLING 

CABLES 






Drilling Tools 
Engines & Supplies 
Pumping Outfits 



R. H. HERRON CO. 

509 Mission St. - SAN FRANCISCO 



The 

Name 

Determines 

the 

Quality 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Investor Wants Returns. 

The average investor, after he places 
his money in a prospect oil company, 
wants returns and wants them quick. 
He forgets that in the oil business, as in 
any other business, it takes titre to at- 
tain results, and that while the failures 
in the oil business are no greater in pro- 
portion than they are in any other line of 
business there are nevertheless times 
when success comes very slowly. Those 
who are unacquainted with oil mining 
operations cannot well understand the 
long delays that are incident to the dev- 
elopment of a proposition. They do not 
appreciate the fact that while there may 
be many thousand dollars' worth of oil 
in the property It takes time to sink 
wells. It is a fact, nevertheless, that 
when production is once started the 
earnings in the oil business are greater 
than in any other line of business with a 
like amountof capital invested. Returns 
cannot be expected until a large amount 
of preliminary work is done. Mining is 
a business and not a gamble. The in- 
vestor who is after a get-rich-quick in- 
vestment had better place his money on 
the wheel, horse races or play the east- 
ern stock market through the bucket 
shops, where you lose or win as fast as 
you can place your money. 



To Inspect Refinery. 

The city council will visit the plant of 
the Union oil refinery in the Arroyo 
Seco in East Los Angeles next Saturday 
to inspect the improvements recently 
made by the company for the purpose of 
protecting the city's water supply from 
possible contamination by the bursting 
of one of the company's big distillate 
tanks. Property owners in the neigh- 
borhood of the refinery have protested 
to the council that the fumes- from the 
refinery are such as to endanger the 
health of several hundred residents of 
the East Side. Three months ago the 
matter was up in the council and the 
refinery people were given ninety days' 
time in which to perfect apparatus for 
confining the gases that proved so objec- 
tionable to the residents, and to build 
bulwarks so as to protect the city's water 
supply frcm a possible deluge of oil and 
distillate. East Siders went before the 
council yesterday to insist that these im- 
provements have not been made. Major 
Russel, manager of the refinery, claimed 
that his company had followed the rec- 
ommendations of the council to the let- 
ter, and the council decided to visit the 
refinery and make a personal inspec- 
tion. 



Deep Hand=du£ Well, 

The deepest hand-dug well in the 
world is situated on the Magura prop- 
erty, near Matita, in the district of Pra- 
hova, in Roumania. It has reached a 
depth of 850 feet, which is 60 feet below 
where oil in an adjoining well has been 
found, but owing to a dip in the strata, 
the desired sand has not been enconnter- 
ed. 



New Refinery. 



E. O. Turner, general manager of the 
Eastern and Consolidated Oil company 
of Bakersfield states that the big refinery 
that is being erected by the Eastern 
Consolidated three miles north of Bak- 
ersfield will be ready January 1st. It 
will have a daily capacity of 1,000 barrels, 
being the second 1 rgest of its kind in 
the state. We are installing a six-inch 
pipe line from the refinery to the rail- 
road, five 1 miles distant," said Mr. 
Turner. "Operations in this field are 
lively. Many producers have oversold 
their production, which has resulted in 
renewed efforts in deve'oping their pro- 
perties to the highest yield possible. 

The Standard Oil company is making 
preparations for the storage of 3,000,000 
barrels in addition to the present capa- 
city of its plant. This involves the con- 
struction of six new reservoirs, upon 
which the work is being pushed with all 
possible speed." 



Second Pipe Line Possible. 



The news comes from Point Rich- 
mond that the great Standard pipe line 
is working better than the most san- 
guine supposed would be the case. 
They are handling from 10,000 to 15,000 
barreis a day. This is Coalinga oil. It 
would not be surprising if a second pipe 
line were being considered. 

At the refinery at Richmond they are 
making large quantities of coke and the 
demand is greater than the supply. 
This coke sells for about {7.00 a ton in 
carload lots. For domestic purposes 
this coke is preferable to coal 



U. M. THOMAS 

318 Pine Street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



OIL LANDS 



Successor to the Land De= 
partment of the 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Buy and sell oil land in 
all the proven oil belts 
of California. 



Coalinga Lands a Specialty 



Bound Volumes 

of the 

Pacific 

Oil 

Reporter 



MAY BB HAD AS FOLLOWS: 

From Nov. 1, 1899, to Nov. 1, 1900 $6.00 

From Nov. 1, 1900, to Nov. 1, 1901 6.00 

From Nov. I, 1901, to Nov. 1, 1902 5.00 



These volumes are strengly and 
artistically bound, and contain 
the only full and correct informa- 
tion as to the development of the 
oil industry on the Pacific coast. 



Editorial and Publishing Office 

318 Pine Street 
San Francisco, - Cal. 



THE 



Pacific Oil Reporter 



is the only 
OIL JOURNAL 
Published on the 
Pacific Coast. 

It gives full, fresh and authentic oil news from 
all the oil districts, new and old. It exposes 
fraudulent oil companies. It gives the latest 
information on oil stocks and dividends. It 
describes the latest method of drilling wells, 
pumping, piping and storing oil; use of oil for 
road making, etc. 

It is the only paper which advocates the belief 
that California's refined asphalt is the equal 
of Trinidad asphalt for paving and other pur- 
poses, and is In every way superior to bitumi- 
nous rock, the use of which has given San 
Francisco, Oakland and other California cities 
so many poor streets. 

The subscription price is $2.50 a year. If you 
are interested In any way In California oil, cut 
out the following coupon, fill in the blank lines, 
and send it, accompanied by check, money 
order or express order to the 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine St. San Francisco 



for- 



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318 Pine Street, San Francisco. 

Please enter my subscription to t he Pacific Oil, Reporter 

ut $ 



Signed- 



Address 



Date 



PACIFIC OIL RBFORTRR 



M 



*\ 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
On January first, 1904, the PACIFIC OIL REPORTER jg 



Mr 

to 
ili 
to 
to 
to 
to 
to 
to 
to 
to 
iii 
to 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



jjj will issue a Special New Year's Edition, covering the j[y 

\b progress made in all of the California oil fields during ff\ 

to 2 

to the year 1903, and the outlook for the coming year, JJJ 

j{j together with reliable figures on the output, etc. 'J! 

to * 

to This edition will be superbly illustrated and will W 

to 2! 

fo. contain articles by those most prominent in the oil Jjj 

$ industry. From 25,000 to 30,000 copies will be circu= $ 

to W 

to lated. Secure your advertising space at once, as it is ff 






\jj already being rapidly taken. 

* I 

%»£S*aaMH^i«»»M*» ******** 



14 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



Continued from Page Eleven. 



the property ready for work. 

At a recent meeting of the Blue Dia- 
mond Oil company held in Grass Valley, 
an assessment, No. I, of one cent per 
share of the capital stock of the com- 
pany was levied. The company is now 
■down 1300 feet with with its first well. 

Certain parties have taken an option 
on the two sections of the Zenith Oil 
•compary, one section is 35, 20-14 and 
ithe other section is 1, 21-14. 

The Wabash oil company is at work on 
its second rig which is to be hurried 
«long uninterruptedly to its compl'tion 
lin order that drilling might begin at an 
early date. 

'Two new houses are also under construc- 
tion to increase the camp facilities. 

The tank builders are at work on the 
Esperanza tanks, building the 3000-bar- 
rel tanks first, after which work on the 
30,000-barrel tanks will begin. It will 
take about two months to complete the 
three tanks. 

The first well of the Pleasant Valley 
Stock company was finished the past 
week and is now flowing at the rate of 
250 barrels per day of an 18 gravity oil. 
A moderately large reservoir has been 
improvised for the retaining of the o'l 
until it is settled, when it will be pump- 
ed into the tanks which were erected to 
be used as gauge tanks. A well of such 
a capacity adds considerably to the west 
side production and is classed among the 
best producers in the field. Well num- 
ber two is over 800 feet deep. 

For the past week surveyors have been 
at work outlining the course of the field 
lines for the Southern Pacific Railroad. 
The tank iron for the 35,000 barrel tank 
to be erected on section 7 has been 
received. Ditching for one line extend- 
ing from section 7 up to the north line of 
section 1 is completed, and a gang of 
men is expected to begin laying pipe 
soon. A considerable quantity of 4 and 
6-inch pipe has been stacked up at the 
terminus of the main line for use in the 
field. 

Hanford Oil company landed the cas- 
ing in number 5 well and will in all 
probability finish it by the end of the 
week. Numbersix rig is nearly finished 
so that drilling can be begun immediate- 
ly after number 5 is put to producing. 



Oiling Road Bed. 



A Santa Fe work train passed through 
Hanford Tuesday on its way north from 
Bakersfield, and the road bed is being 
oiled as they go. This is the third or 
fourth time in many years that the Santa 
Fe company has treated its track in this 
manner with satisfactory results. The 
possibility of the courts construing this 
process of dust laying an infringement 
on anyone's patent does not seem to be 
considered at all serious by the com- 
pany, as no delay has thus far been oc- 
casioned by the prospective litigation. 



California Stock and Oil 
Exchange. 

The following were the stock sales in 
the California Stock and Oil Exchange' 
in the formal sessions held for the week 
ending Wednesday, November 25th. 

ASSOCIATED OIL CO. STOCK 
TRUST CERTIFICATES. 

79 at 18 $ 14 22 

9°4 at 19 171 76 

3,000 at 20 60000 

CARIBOU. 

300 at 1 00 300 00 

500 at 105 52500 

ESPERANZA. 

100 at 155 155 00 

FULTON. 

50 at 450 22500 

HANFORD. 

a at 133 00 26600 

5 at 137 (S90)... 68500 

"1 at 138 00 690 00 



HOME OIL. 

300 at 10000(1)90) 20000 

100 at 97K(S6o) 97 5° 

INDEPENDENCE. 

4,050 at 16 64800 

100 at 15 (B 5) 15 00 

KERN. 

9»at 4 75 427 50 

LION. 

3,500 at 03 10500 

MONARCH. 

1,200 at 49 58800 

100 at 50 5000 

100 at 48 4800 

50oat 45 225 00 

50 at 47 23 50 

MONTE CRISTO. 

56at 77^ 4340 

OIL CITY PETROLEUM. 

1,000 at 27 27000 

PEERLESS. 
50 at 13 75 687 50 

REED CRUDE. 

230 at 4} 8) 00 

SUPERIOR. 

T, 500 at 05 7500 

500 at 06 (S 30) 3000 



613 Market St., San Francisco- 



18,241 Shares Amount {7,245.38 

FISHER R. THEATRE CO. 

175 at 200 00 350 00 

MAKAWELI SUGAR. 
10 at 23% 235 00 

PAAUHAU SUGAR. 
40 at 15 00 600 00 



225 Shares 



Amount, $1,185.00 



The monthly record of sa 
January 1, 1903, is as follows: 
Shares. 

January 267,019 

February 332,443 

March 199,908 

April 236,268 

May 4oi,454 

June 154,720 

July 74,594 

August 181,478 

September 146, 123 



les since 

Va'ue. 
{255,202 
219,358 
151,982 
"5,57' 
154,386 
"7,928 

71,890 
119,231 

74,455 



1.40 



■ 82'A 
■15 



.90 
.60 
.19 

24 



2 00 



138.00 
1.00 



Stock Quotations. 

Following are the latest quotations for 
stocks of oil companies listed on the Cal- 
ifornia Stock and Oil Exchange : 

Oil Stocks. Bid. Asked. 

Alma 1.35 

Apollo .42 

Asso. Oil Co Stk. Tr. 

Certificates 19 

Aztec 

Bay City .07 

Bear Flag 

California Standard ... .12 

Caribou 

Central Point Con.. . 

Chicago Crude , 

Clairemont . . . . 

Csperanza 

Fauna ., 

Four 65 

Fulton 45-) , 

Giant 

Hanford 

Home -97>6 

Homestake 

Imperial 

Independence..,. .. . :5 

Junction 

Kern 4 75 

Kern River 1 o 

Lion 

Monarch of Arizona .. 45 

Maricopa 

McKittrick 

Monte Cristo 75 

Nevada 

Occidental of West Va 18 

Oil City Petroleum 27 

Peerless 13-75 

Petroleum Centc r 

Piedmont 

Pittsburg 

Reed Crude 39 

Reed Crude, New Issue 

S. F. & McKittrick.... 2.75 
San Joaquin O. & D.. . 4.0, 

Senator 60 

Shamrock 

Sovereign 38 

Sterling 

Sunset(Or ) 12 

Superior 05 

Thirty-three 7.00 

Toltec 

Twenty • eight 

Union 

United Petroleum 

West Shore 2.85 

Western Petroleum 

Wolverine 35 



04 
50 
10 
30 
80 



4 50 
■ 72M 



.40 

•■7 



7-50 

• 25 

4.-.0 



4\ 

Santa Fe 



ALL THE WAY 

CHICAGO 
In 3 Days 



Trains leave Union Ferry Depot, San Fran- 
cisco, as follows: 

7aa A. M.— *BAKERSFIRI / D LOCAL; Due 
"Jill Stockton 10:40 a. m,, Fresno 2:40 p. m., 
•vv Bakersfield 7:15 p. m. Stops at all points 
in San Joaquin Valley. Corresponding 
train arrives 8:55 a. m. 

9AA A. M.-g"THE CALIFORNIA LIMIT- 
•*|l ED;" Due Stockton 12:01 p. m., Fresno 
" v 3:20 p. in., Bakersfield 6:00 p. m., Kansas 
City 3rd day 2:35 a. m,, Chicago 3rd day 
2:15 p. m. Palace Sleepers and Dining 
Car through to Chicago. No second class 
tickets honored on this train. Corres- 
ponding train arrives °n : io p. m. 
9aa A. M.— *VALLEV LIMITED; Due 
•^11 Stockton 12:01 p. m„ Fresno 3:20 p. til 
,t,v Bakersfield 6:00 p. m. The fastest train 
in the Valley. Carries Composite and 
Reclining Chair Car, No second class 
tickets honored on this train. Corres- 
ponding train arrives 11:10 p. m. 
4 A A P. M.— * STOCKTON LOCAL; Due 
*|HI Stockton 7:10 p. m. Corresponding train 
• vw arrives n:io a. m, 

8AA P. M— *OVERLA.ND EXPRESS ; Due 
Mill Stockton 11:15 P- "., Fresno 3:15 a. m. 
• vv Bakersfield 7:35 a. m , Kansas City 4th 
day 7:00 a. m., Chicago 4th day 8:47 p. m. 
Palace and Tourist Sleepers and free Re- 
clining Chair Cars through to Chicago. 
Also Palace Sleeper which cuts out at 
Fresno. Corresponding train arrives 
4:25 p. m. 
* Daily g Mondays and Thursdays 

Tuesdays and Fridays. 
Personally Conducted Parties for Kansas 
City, Chicago and East leave on Overland Express 
Monday, Thursday and Saturday at 8:00 p. m. 
Ticket Offices, 641 Market Street and in Ferry 
Depot, San Francisco; and 1112 Broadway 
Oakland. 



UNION 
PACIFIC 

Suggests 

Speed 
and 
Comfort 

S. F. Booth, Gen. Agent. 

1 Montgomery St., 8. F. 

Phone, Exchange 300. 



Have You Securities 

that pay no dividends and you want 
some that do? If you want to buy, sell 
or exchange investment stocks, or if you 
want gilt-edge shares in operating com- 
panies, address the Debenture Surety 
Company, Rialto Bldg., San Francisco, 
which also incorporates, finances and 
operates good enterprises. 



AMERICAN CONSOLIDATED 
Oil Company 



A. B. Butler, J. A. Chanslor, 

President Vice President 



r 3,75° shares of stock for sale at 
8 cents per share — par value $1.00 

P. W. SPAULDING 

ATTORN LY-AT-LAW 

Evanston - Wyoming 



TO THE EAST 



SUNSET ROUTE 

Means a Trip Taken 

IN COMFORT 

Oiled Track=-No Dust 
OihBurning Engines 
No Cinders 
No Frost*=No Snow 

SUNSET LIMI TED 

1 ■ ■— — — ^— ^». 

San Franctsco to New Orleans 

EVERY DAY 

Dining car, meals a la carte 

Observation Car 

Vestibuled Pullman Sleepers 
Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, 

El Paso, San Antonio, 

Houston, Beaumont and 

Texas Oil Fields. 

Southern Pacific 



W. A. BROPHY, 

914 Mutual Savings Bank Bldg., 

708 Market St., San Francisco. 

Telephone, Green 816. 



Petroleum Lands Examined and Re- 
ported on in all Parts of the United 
States. California a Specialty. 



Companies Incorporated 

under the lieuient laws of 
ARIZONA 

which has the broadest laws of any state. 
Companies can be organized to do busiuess any 
where No personal liability. No limit on capi 
talization. No State examination of books. No 
franchise tax. Stock can be made non-assessable 
and can be issued for services. 

Write for Information and blanks to 
HUGH M. CRE1GHTON & CO. 
Phoenix, Arizona. 



Stock, Bond and Investment Syndicate 

(Incorporated) 
Money Loaned on Stocks. 

Listed and Unlisted Oil and Mining Stocks 
R. I,. CHENBY, Secretary 
514-515 Examiner Building 

San Francisco, California 



Notice of Assessment. 



HIGH GRAVITY OIL COMPANY; 
Principal place of business, city and 
courty of San Francisco, State of Cali- 
fornia. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meet- 
ing of the Board of Directors of the 
High Gravity Oil Company held on the 
iSth day of November A, D. 1903, an 
was levied upon the capital stock of the 
corporation payable immediately to the 
Secretary of the corporation at its office 
No. 423 Market street, in the city and 
county of San Francisco, State of 
California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment 
shall remain unpaid on the 23rd day of 
December, 1903, will be delinquent and 
advertised for sale at public auction and 
unless payment is made before, will be 
sold on Wednesday the 13th day of 
January A. D. 1904, to pay the delinquent 
assessment, together with costs cf ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors. 
D.ROSENBLUM, Secretary. 
Location of office No. 423 Market 
street, city of San Francisco, State of 
California. 



J. S. EWEN 

STOCKBROKER 

318 PINE STREET, Room 5 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Member California Stock and Oil Ex- 
change, and San Francisco and Tonopah 
Mining Fxchange. 

Tbibphonb Main 1552. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 5. N 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., SATl'RDAY. INCUMBER 5, IQ03. 



Prick, Tkn Cbnts. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Waakll 

The oa Authority of the Pacific Caul 

I.a«ar«d B» California Patroiaaaa Mlaara' Aaaoclatloa 



MRS. MARIA ROSA WINN, Proprietor. 
B. S. EASTMAN, 

Kdllor and Bustneia Manager 

OrPICa AWD BDITOKtAL ROOMB 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco, California 

Telephone. Bush 176. 

THRM8 

Oia Ybak Ja 50 

Six Months 1 50 

t*ikkk Mouths 1 00 

Si «qlb Copiss IOC 

STRICTLY IN A.DVA.NCH 

Mow kt should be sect by Postal Order, Draft or Registered 
Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil Reporter, 318 Pine street. San 
Frandsco, rooms Ji-3>3J. Communications most beaccoruoan.ed 
by writer's name and address, not necessarily for publication. 
but as s guarantee of Rood faith. 

Entered in the Postofflce at San Francisco, California, as sec- 
ond class matter- 

THE PIPE LINE SITUATION. 

The press is airing the subject of the sus- 
pension of the Bakersfield end of the Stand- 
ard pipe line and there is an endless amount 
of conjecture as to what the Standard's next 
move will be. Some of our contemporaries 
say that the Standard will not verify any of 
the current reports as to the line being a 
failure or the possibility of a refinery at Kern 
and we do not know that anyone with a 
reasonable amount of intelligence would 
expect them to. The Standard is not in the 
habit of casting such information broadcast; 
what information they do give being of a 
nature that will hold back the facts of the 
real issue. The fact that the pipe line has 
stopped pumping Kern River oil remains 
undisputed and it is also a well known fact 
that no new contracts are being made. We 
are well aware that the Standard lacks stor- 
age facilities and that new tanks will be 
built near San Pablo and we also know that 
Coalinga is producing enough oil to make 
even this storage inadequate. The building 
of a refinery at Kern is the most plausible 
theory of what will be done with the Kern 
River oil as we are informed work has al- 
ready been commenced on the grading for 
the refinery. 

RAILROADS ACTIVE. 

A belief in the permanency of the produc- 
tion from the California oil fields is very ap- 
parent by the activity shown on the part of 
the railroads. The purchase of a large block 
of the Associated stock recently by the 
Southern Pacific company, looks like they 
expect to want the oil for their own use. 
They are operating extensively in the Mc- 
Klttrfck district and own thousands of acres 
of land, supposed to be oil land, that has 
never been prospected. The Santa Fe com- 
pany is taking the matter in hand by run- 
ning a line into the heart of the Sunset- 
Midway field. Both roads are using oil for 
fuel almost exclusively, consuming several 
million barrels a year, and with the great 
demand for fuel oil in sight it is the most 
natural thing imaginable to suppose that 
they would want an assurance of an inex- 
haustible supply at a low cost. 



Activity In Alaska. 

Oil seepages and other evidences of oil are 
found all along the coast surrounding Con- 
troller bay, Alaska, varying in with from 
seven miles at Yakataga to twenty-five miles 
at Copper River. The oil land has all been 
staked in large tracts by twenty different 
companies. The English company has 
about 70,000 acres, and own the land which 
has a flowing well. The English owners 
have four well-boring rigs on their ground 
and are erecting derricks preparatory to 
putting them all to work. The Alaska Steam 
Coal and Petroleum company, known as the 
Lippy company, has one rig now boring 
which has reached a depth of about 200 feet. 
The Alaska oil syndicate owns about 30,000 
acres of choice land. They have their well 
down 440 feet and have encountered con- 
siderable gas. The Cudahy company has 
one rig in operation and will soon have an- 
other. It owns 10,000 acres. The Spokane 
syndicate has two rigs en route to put on its 
ground near Martin river. The Union Oil 
company of California has two rigs ready 
for shipment, to be put also near Martin 
river. Steve Bailey, of Seattle has a crew 
of men preparing the ground for a rig which 
he is sending in. Chanslor & Canfield, ex- 
tensive California operators, will have one 
rig on their ground in a few days, and will 
ship two more at a later date, and the 
Alaska Oil and Development company has a 
halt a dozen rigs drilling and three produc- 
ing wells. 

Great Oil Deposits in Southwest. 






Prof. Robert T. Hill, for more than twenty 
years connected with the United States Geo- 
logical survey, predicts that all the stretch of 
prairie and swamp land lying between New 
Orleans and Tampico, Mexico, will be a 
great center for oil, salt, sulphur, and other 
minerals, as well as agriculture, and that 
swamp land in that section will become very 
valuable. Prof. Hill says there is oil all 
through this part of the country, and in his 
opinion, discoveries will continue to be made 
almost indefinitely, and the Southwest will 
soon have enough oil to supply the world. 
People who are already interested in oil are 
somewhat impatient to get returns on their 
investments, but Prof. Hill says it must be 
remembered that the oil fields of Louisiana 
and Texas were enlarged more quickly than 
any other fields in the history of the oil in- 
dustry. He believes that all the minerals 
that are ordinarily found in the vicinity of 
oil deposits will be found in large quantities 
throughout that region. 



Sunset Pipe Line. 



The pipe line commonly referred to as 
the Jewett & Blodget pipe line is really a 
project handled and owned entirely by the 
California Consolidated Oil Fields company. 
This company was formed early in this year, 
incorporated under the laws of Maine, capi- 
talized for 4,000,000, with headquarters in 
Paris.i S. Jewett, of Bakersfield, is the presi- 
dent, H. A. Blodget, vice-president and gene- 
ral manager. All the other officers are in 



Paris and vicinity. The company purchased 
the refinery, all the oil lands, wells, machin- 
ery and other property and interests lying 
in the Sunset and Midway fields that were 
formerly owned by the Jewett & Blodget 
company and the Operators' Oil company. 
The laying of the pipe line will begin just 
as soon as all the materials are on the ground, 
which will probably be within a month. A 
force of at least thirty-five men will be 
needed. The line will consist of a 10-inch 
main from the Croesus on section 25 to the 
railroad at Sunset, where large tankage 
facilities, loading racks, and all necessary 
adjuncts will be erected. From the main 
line 8 and 6-inch laterals will connect all 
companies desiring this means of transporta- 
tion for their product. — Driller. 



A Busy Camp. 



The camp of the E. B. &. A. L. Stone, of 
Oakland, who has the contract to build the 
railroad extension from Sunset to Maricopa, 
is a bustling little settlement in itself. 
Forty men and fifty horses are now em- 
ployed to carry on the grading alone, and 
more will be needed when the work of lay- 
ing the ties and rails begin. Each train 
brings an addition to the materials needed 
and the contractors are confident that they 
will have the road in working order at an 
early date. The contract calls for two and 
six-tenths miles of track, including switches, 
and as far as is known at present, will follow 
the line of the grade stakes as now set. The 
report than an injunction had been served 
to prevent the contractors laying the road 
across the property near the depot owned 
by the successors to the Jewett & Blodget 
company has no foundation. The contractors 
were asked to withhold operations on this 
particular strip of ground until some details 
in the agreement had been arranged, but no 
time will be lost In this way, and no impedi- 
ment has been placed in the way of the 
railroad or its progress. — Driller. 



We manufacture the best 
lubricating oils for oil 
drillers 

KING KEYSTONE OIL CO., 
116 Front St., San Francisco. 



FOR SALE 

A complete oil well drilling 
outfit near Huntington, Ore- 
gon. Inventory and price 
on application to 
H. V. GATES, Hillsboro, Oregon. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOIKM ooooooooooooooooooooooo 

Search for Oil in Oregon and Idaho. 

1 Report of Professor I. C Russell, of the United States I 
8 Geological Survey. | 

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Professor I. C. Russell, of the U. S. Geologi- 
cal Survey, has just completed an interesting 
report upon the geology of southwestern 
Idaho and southeastern Oregon, with special 
reference to the probability of the exitsence 
of oil and gas pools in this region, which has 
been quite comprehensively prospected with- 
in the past year or two with disastrous 
results to the Investors in numerous com- 
panies organized for the development of this 
field. Search for petroleum has been carried 
on extensively in the valley of Snake river 
in Idaho and Oregon, but these attempts 



the occurrence of oil and gas pools, and then 
proceeds to point out the variations likely to 
be encountered in the regions referred to, 
after whieh he indicates the most promising 
localities for the drilling of wells to deter- 
mine whether oil exists in commercial quanti- 
ties in this district. He says in part:— 

" A variation of the conditions considered 
occurrs when the strata are gently Inclined 
over broad areas, and the rocks are bent 
along certain axis without being folded so as 
to form true anticlines, but produce fiat, 
terrace-like areas in a region of gently- 



penetrated to reach the necessary rock. It 
is well known, however, that the nearly fiat 
areas, as the drill shows them to be, in 
certain regions where the rocks are gently 
inclined in the same direction on each side, 
sometimes contain commercial quantities of 
liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons. 

"In the consideration of the influence and 
texture of the storage of petroleum and gas 
we have assumed that water is also present 
in the rocks. While this is the normal and 
practically universal condition, yet it may 
happen that water is absent from a porous 
layer containing the other two substances 
named. In the absence of water, petroleum 
would accumulate in the downward folds or 
would descend until arrested by an impervi- 
ous stratum, and gas would occupy the re- 
mainder of the porous bed. An Increase in 
the amount of gas would be accompanied by 
an increase in pressure. Under these 
scarcely to be expected conditions, a well 
penetrating a syncline would yield oil under 




Constructing a 35,000-Barre^Tank for the Standard Oil Company, Kern River. 



have all proved failures, a fact which Pro- 
fessor Russell attributed to a lack of know- 
ledge of the geological conditions and to a 
very slight appreciation of the laws govern- 
ing the accumulation and storage of petro- 
leum, especially in such structures as are 
encountered throughout this district. 

As much time and money have been spent 
in this region in fruitless attempts to discover 
petroleum, and as additional efforts will no 
douct be made in the same direction, Profes- 
sor Russell suggests that more conservative 
methods may be favored if a plain statement 
be made of the peculiar geological formation 
which characterize this district, as well as 
other regions (that have been subject to vol- 
canic action, taken in connection with a 
brief summary of the latest information 
available regarding the occurrence of petro- 
leum under such conditions. After describ- 
ing in detail the geology of this region, 
which is marked by the effects of extensive 
volcanic phenonema, Professor Russell des- 
cribes the well known anti-clinal theory of 



inclined beds. Such ' terraces ' or ' arrested 
anticlines ' occur in Ohio and have been 
described by Professor Orton. For example, 
oil-bearing rocks about 2,500 feet thick enter 
the Macksburg oil field, dipping gently 
southeast, at a rate of 20 to 30 feet to the 
mile, but they suddenly cease their descent 
and for about three miles there is no appreci- 
able fall. The amount of territory included 
in the terrace appears to be 15 or 20 square 
miles. Beyond this the regular dip is re- 
sumed. It is difficult to understand how the 
petroleum and gas are retained in a ' ter- 
race ' if it is really horizontal, but the condi- 
tions regulating the storage of these sub- 
stances are so delicately adjusted that a dif- 
ference of a very few feet in the height of 
the ton of this porous layer may deter- 
mine the success or failure of a well drilled 
to it. The difficulty of ascertaining the 
actual position of the surface of the porous 
layer when gently Inclined Is shown by the 
fact that a thickness of a thousand feet or 
more of overlying strata has frequently to be 



gas pressure which might be great, while a 
well drilled in the course of an adjacent 
anticline would yield gas only, the oil not 
rising unless the relation of the well to the 
inclination of the porous layer was such that 
the oil would Itself produce hydraulic pres- 
sure. In such a case the flow of petroleum 
would not be followed by water, and when 
the overflow ceased the well would still be 
filled with petroleum. 

"Certain modifications or limitations of 
the general principal above stated need to be 
kept In mind by persons searching for com- 
mercial supplies of petroleum and gas, lest 
valuable pools of exceptional character be 
overlooked. One of the exceptional condi- 
tions referred to is the absence of a pervious 
stratum to act as a reservoir or receiver. For 
example, a bed of shale which is Impervious 
to water may be of such a texture as to per- 
mit of the slow percolation of petroleum and 
the ready passage of gas. Should such an 
oil-charged shale occur in thick masses, as in 
the Cretaceous system in the great plateaus, 






PACIFIC OIL RBPORTKR 



n ithout interbedded porous beds and not 
hiving an impervious cover, the gases gen- 
erated would pass off. leaving heavy petro- 
leum, which would descend to the bottom of 
the generating layer or until It was arrested 
by an impervious stratum. A well drilled in 
such a bed should furnish petroleum, but not 
under pressure. A small but long-continued 
yield by pumping might be expected, the 
petroleum slowly percolating into the well 
from the adjacent country reck In much the 
same way that an ordinary surface well is 
supplied with water. Under the conditions 
just postulated, but petroleum as well as 
water being absent, a well might yield a 
moderate but long-continued supply of gas. 

" Another consideration which may per- 
haps have econo.nic importance is that the 
presence of petroleum, especially the heavier 
varieties, in a porous rock retards the pas- 
sage of water. The outcrop of a porous bed, 
in. which heavy oil has been produced by the 
evaporation of a lighter variety, might seal 
the pores of the rock and thus prevent the 
inflow of water, and therefore the cessation 
ot the outflow of petroleum. These results 
might come about especially In a warm cli- 
mate and modify the conditions under which 
petroleum and gas are usually stored. The 
formation of solid hydrocarbons in porous 
beds and in fissures is but a further step in 
this same direction. Bodies of petroleum- 
bearing sandstone or other rocks above the 
surface drainage of a region might on account 
of the formation of viscous or solid hydro- 
carbons in their superficial portions, be 
made to yield heavy oils if penetrated by 
horizontal wells. 

"The opening of fissures communication 
with the surface above an oil pool is con- 
cidered fatal to it as a reservoir of commer- 
cial value, but if the oil is not under hydraulic 
pressure or if the pressure is not sufficient to 
cause it to overflow and be replaced by 
water, the petroleum may not rise in the 
fissure, or if it does rise not reach the surface, 
and on evaporating, seal the breach and re- 
new the conditions favorable for natural 
storage. Fissures filled with solid hydro- 
carbons may therefore be considered as 
favorable indications of the presence of oil 
pools in their vicinity. While the condi- 
tions under which petroleum and its deriva- 
tions occur in nature are simple and easily 
understood, the application of theory to prac- 
tice is beset with difficulties and uncertain- 
ties. The information that is wanted is the 
texture of the rocks, the order of their occur- 
rence, and their structure at a depth of seve- 
ral hundred or perhaps several thousand feet 
below the surface, and this, too, when the 
surface is usually covered with vegetation 
and soil, alluvial deposits, and possibly a 
thick sheet of glacial drift. While the geolo- 
gist is better able than any one else to judge 
of the conditions to be expected within the 
earth's crust, it must be confessed that the 
only practicable way to secure the desired 
facts in untried regions, is in many Instances, 
to put down test wells at what seem the most 
favorable localities. One important duty of 
the geologist is to discourage ventures in 
regions where the rocks are so greatly dis- 
turbed and broken that gas or water tight 
reservoirs cannot exist, or when other condi- 
tions such as the metamorphism preclude the 
probability of success. The conditions which 
have led to the accumulation and storage of 
petroleum and gas are in general the reverse 
of those which lead to the accumulation of 
water in artesian basins. The most promis- 
ing localities irt the search for relatively light 



hydrocarbon, are in upward folds or anti- 
clines and the most favorable localities for 
storing water in the rocks under pressure 
are in downward folds or syncllnes. This 
difference in the conditions leading to the 
accumulation of oil and water is due to the 
difference in the specific gravities (or weight 
of equal volumes) of the substances named. 
If a fluid heavier than water should be pres- 
ent in the rocks the other conditions con- 
sidered being the same, the water would be 
forced upward and would accumulate In 
anticlines, and the most favorable localities 
for searching for artesian water would be in 
the upward folds, Instead of as now, in the 
downward folds. 

"In attempting to apply the principles 
just considered in Idaho and Oregon, it is 
evident that the search for petroleum should 
be confined to regions where the rocks have 
been but moderately disturbed, and in such 
regions drill holes should be put down in the 
crests of anticlinal folds. The downward 
folds or synclines should be avoided, as water 
is everywhere present in the rocks and all 
the downward folds may be expected to be 
filled with it. Experience In southern Idaho 
has fully sustained these deductions, and 
much time and expense might have been 
saved if they had been given proper consid- 
eration when the search for petroleum 
began. All of the drill holes thus far put 
down with the hope of obtaining petroleum 
are located in broad synclinal basins, and in 
nearly all instances have resulted in obtain- 
ing a surface flow of water. Even after 
several artesian wells had been obtained, the 
drilling of holes for petroleum was continued 
in the same basin, as in Snake River Valley, 
between Guffey and Welser, and uniformly 
with the same result. Although there has 
been a total failure to obtain petroleum, what 
In the end will prove to be a much more 
valuable result, so far as the development of 
the region is concerned, has been secured, 
namely, the demonstration of the value of the 
Lewis artesian basin. 

"While the region crossed by Snake River 
In Western Idaho and the adjacent portion 
of Oregon, in the vicinity of Owyhee, Vale, 
and Ontario, is a broad syncline, nearly flat 
In its central portion, it does not follow that 
the entire region Is a single great fold. 
There may be secondary wrinkles, and be- 
neath the small upward folds, if such are 
present, petroleum and gas might occur, and 
be under the pressure of the water in the 
broader and in general trough-shaped de- 
pression. 

"The only locality in Snake River Valley 
in Western Idaho, so far as I can judge from 
the explorations I was enabled to make, at 
which one would be justified in drilling for 
the purpose of prospecting for petroleum, is 
the southern part of Canyon county, in the 
vicinity of Pickles Butte. The rocks there 
apparently rise into a small anticline, the 
longer axis of which trends about northwest 
and northeast. A careful study of the region 
referred to should show whether an anti- 
cline is present or not, and if discovered a 
drill hole put down to a depth of 1,000 or 
1,200 feet would furnish a crucial test as to 
the presence of petroleum or gas. So far as 
can be judged, the Payette formation, which, 
together with sheets of basalt, underlies the 
Snake River plains, is notably free of organic 
matter, and the chances seem to be that even 
if anticlines or other conditions favoring the 
storage of petroleum or gas are present, but 
little hope of obtaining commercial quanti- 
ties of these substances can reasonably be 
entertained." 



Home Oil Suit to Federal Courts. 



A writ of error has been tnken from the 
state courts to the United States supremr 
court in the noted suit of !•:. O Miller and 
the Home Oil company against A. Y. Chris- 
man and others, over the ownership of valu- 
able oil lands in the Coalinga district, says 
the Bakersfield Callfornlan. Attorney L. 
L Cory, one of the counsel for the plaintiff, 
was notified of this action Tuesday. It is 
contended by the defendants, who sue out 
the writ, that the case involves the construc- 
tion of a federal statute and the decision of 
the state supreme court in favor of the 
plaintiff is opposed to the title set up under 
the act of congress. Mr. Cory says that the 
plaintiff will not admit that the federal laws 
have any application. It is probable that 
he will move to dismiss the writ on the 
ground that the federal supreme court has 
no jurisdiction. The writ is made return- 
able in Washington on January 8th. 

There have been few oil land cases more 
vigorously fought on both sides than this, 
which involves title to the northeast quarter 
of section 20, township 19 south, range 15 
east. 

Great Oil Belt. 



A recent communication from Washing- 
ton says that there are geologic indications 
that conditions within an area 250 miles in 
length, varying in width from two to six 
miles, and comprised within the three 
states, Kansas, Nebraska and South Dakota, 
are similar to those in which oil and gas 
have been found. In investigating the geo- 
logic structure of the central plains region, 
Mr. N. H. Darton, of the United States Geo- 
logical Survey, has discovered an uplift, or 
arch, in the earth's crust, which may pr. ve 
of greatest economic importance from a pe- 
troleum standpoint. Owing to the thick 
covering of clays and sands in the plains, 
the structure of the underlying rocks is 
difficult to ascertain, but, from a careful sur- 
vey of exposures in western Kansas, the 
Republican valley in Nebraska, and the 
southwestern corner of South Dakota and 
the consideration of much new evidence 
there by well borings in the last few years, 
Mr. Darton has demonstrated the existence 
of a narrow arch, or saddle-back, of con- 
siderable magnitude, extending from the 
vicinity of Lenora, Kansas, through Norton 
county, across Furnas, Frontier, Lincoln and 
other counties in Nebraska, and the White 
river, where this river crosses the Nebraska 
and South Dakota line. 

Allen In the Oil Business. 



James Lane Allen, the novelist, has sud- 
denly become a millionaire through a chance 
investment of a few hundred dollars in the 
Texas Oil field. 

Some time ago Allen acquired a tract of 
350 acres of land in southeastern Texas. 
The land was worth less than $5 an acre and 
was practically of no use except for pastur- 
rge. A few weeks ago a gusher oil well was 
brought in at Batson Prairie, within a mile 
of Allen's lan.i. The new oil field has been 
the scene of the wildest excitement since 
then and a town of 1,000 population has 
sprung up at Batson Prairie, where there 
was only one store building prior to the oil 
discovery. Land values are increasing daily. 

Allen could sell his entire tract at $3,000 
an acre, but it is said he is holding it for 
$5,000 an acre, which would bring him a 
fortune of $1,700,000. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ffwss 



I 



NEWS FROM TDE FIELD 



Supplied by our Regular Correspondents 



Wyoming Letter. 

Evanston, Wyo., Dec. i, 1903. 

W. A. Gray, foreman for the Atlantic & 
Pacific Oil company, left Monday evening 
for California, where he will spend the win- 
ter. He says that his company have closed 
down drilling operations for the winter, but 
that a crew of men will be kept in the field 
this winter, pumping three of their heaviest 
producers. He remarked that his company 
had 3,000-barrel tankages on the ground, 
and when asked by the writer if he thought 
there would be any trouble filling these 
tanks, answered: "Not at all, we could fill 
three times the tankage this winter without 
much trouble." When it is taken into con- 
sideration that this supply will come from 
three wells, it makes the skeptical investor 
wonder why he didn't come in on the 
ground floor. 

The Standard Reserve company, who are 
drilling on the NEX of section 12, 15-118, 
encountered a very fair showing of oil at a 
depth of about 800 feet. This oil was found 
in the fourth sand and is the same grade as 
that found in the third sand in other wells 
in the Spring Valley field. The first sand 
in this well produced a yellow oil, being 
about the same grade as that discovered in 
the Bettys well. C. O. Richardson, the 
manager of the Standard Reserve, was in the 
city Wednesday and is highly elated over 
the progress made thus far. He says that 
he will drill all winter and that in the early 
spring two more rigs will be placed on the 
company's property. 

The Bettys people are erecting derrick 
No. 2 on their property south of town. This 
promising territory now boasts of four 
Standard derricks, with the prospects of sev- 
eral more going up in the early spring. 
Just mark the prediction. If oil is found in 
this district, the wells will prove the heaviest 
producers in the whole field. 

A petition is being circulated among the 
oil men asking the government to extend 
the time for making discoveries on un- 
patented U. P. land. It will be remembered 
that the interior department gave public 
notice about a year ago that locators of this 
land would be given until December 31, 
1903, in which to make discoveries on their 
claims. It is argued by the various locators 
that, in view of the fact that this is a new 
and undeveloped field, it has been impos- 
sible for them to proceed to make discoveries 
on all of their holdings. Then again, many 
of the locators are poor men without means 
to proceed to a great depth in finding the oil 
that surely lies under their holdings. It is 
almost certain that the government will 
make an extension of the time. 

James H. Guild of Piedmont was in town 
Wednesday on oil land business. Mr. Guild 
owns several valuable petroleum claims in 
the Uinta county field. His wife and young 
son accompanied him to the city. 

The Ohio & Wyoming Co., who con- 
template getting out a prospectus, have had 
their holdings and derricks located near the 
Bettys well, photographed. They received 
some excellent views. One derriek of this 
company is located on Sec. 34-14-120; the 
other on Sec. 8- 13-120. 



C. A. Dorn of the Oil Well Supply Co., 
says: "In summing up the situation there is 
no longer any question about the presence 
of oil in paying quantities in this part of 
Wyoming. There is at present seven wells 
which would give at least an average of 25 
barrels each of the highest quality of oil yet 
found in the United States. One well has 
been pumped recently and produced at the 
rate of 1500 barrels a day, but do not think 
it could keep this up for any length of time. 
The one thing needed in the district is 
storage. There is already on the ground a 
tank house which has a storage capacity of 
2,000 barrels besides the tanks at the wells, 
and these are full. Shipping of the product 
will not begin until next spring when it will 
either be taken to the Florence, Colorado, re- 
fineries or to those recently established on 
the coast." In speaking of the future Mr. 
Dorn says that the American Consolidated 
company will be running at least fourteen 
strings of tools, which represent as many 
wells. This is only one company, though it 
is the largest perhaps, while others will 
swell the number to nearly a hundred. Mr. 
Dorn was recently at the Fossil field but says 
no oil has been discovered there, though 
systematic development work was under way 
which at any time may change the appear- 
ance of things in that field. The Oil Well 
Supply Company is building a large machine 
shop at Spring Valley, where all manner of 
repairing can be done close by the wells. 



Coalinga Letter. 

Coaunga, Dec. 2, 1903. 

The Genesee Oil company spudded in on 
its first well last Saturday. From the ap- 
proximate depth of the neighboring wells, 
the Genesee is on land where the oil sand 
should be struck somewhere about 1,200 
feet. 

After a somewhat difficult fishing job, the 
M. K. & T. has regained the string of tools 
which were lost two weeks ago and resumed 
drilling. 

The Kaweah Oil company has erected a 
rig on the SW^ of section 14, 19-15, and 
one derrick each on the other three-quarter 
sections of 14. Just how soon development 
work will begin is uncertain, but the com- 
pany is endeavoring to push work as quickly 
as possible. 

Oil City Petroleum company is rigging up 
for No. 9 to begin drilling when No. 8 is 
completed, which has been in the oil sand 
for some days. 

Hanford Oil company's No. 6 is being 
rigged up. They are having a little trouble 
with the casing in No. 5 or it would have 
been finished by this time; it is 1,175 f ee t- 

The Blue Diamond Oil company has tem- 
porarily suspended operations awaiting the 
necessary tools to be used in regaining the 
casing that was lost. In the attempt to get 
out the parted casing, the string of casing 
used for the purpose was also parted. The 
well is 1,300 feet deep with sfi-inch casing 
in the hole. 

The Roberts Oil company has finished its 
first well on section 1, 20-14 at a compara- 
tively shallow depth, 800 feet. It was put on 
the pump last Sunday and producing at the 
rate of from 150 to 200 barrels of 14 gravity 
oil. A tank has previously been erected to 
store the oil for the immediate present until 
arrangements for disposing of it have been 
made. 

The Union Oil company has finished its 
four-inch pipe line to Ora and pumped the 



first tank of oil through it the early part of 
this week. A large reservoir is being 
scraped out between well No. 1 and 2 to be 
used in settling the oil as it comes from the 
wells. Arrangement had been made to per- 
forate No. 2 well last Friday, but it was 
finally decided to go deeper with it. 

An erroneous report was sent in last week 
regarding the size of the tank the Southern 
Pacific are to build on section 7. It will be 
a 10,000-barrel tank. A. stretch of several 
hundred yards of the eight-inch pipe line 
has been taken bringing the terminus of the 
line to the east half of section 7. Material 
and tools for the building of the 200,000-bar- 
rel reservoir is constantly being hauled with 
every indication that most aggressive work 
will be carried on soon. A four-inch pipe 
line is now being laid to the Fresno- San 
Francisco Oil company by the Southern Pa- 
cific company. 

The New York-Coalinga Oil company's 
wells have undergone the cleaning out pro- 
cess which resulted in nearly doubling the 
daily production of the wells. 

Mercantile Crude No. 3 has: been bailed 
for nearly a week and will be put to pump- 
ing the middle of this week. As this well is 
only several hundred feet north of the Es- 
peranza, a big production is anticipated 
from this well at the present indications. 

The Home Oil company has cleaned out 
out two of its wells and others will be under- 
taken in turn. 

Twenty-eight Oil company has been 
deepening No. 8 well for the past two weeks. 
The recently completed well after being 
deepened continues in its big production 
averaging 300 barrels per day. 

The tank gang at present working on the 
Esperanza tank has received re-inforcement 
of a dozen extra men. After completing 
these tanks they will begin work on the 
railroad company's tank. 

Well No. 2, on the Nathan lease on sec- 
tion 7, has been delayed on account of an 
accident. While working the casing last 
Wednesday, the derrick was pulled in to a 
considerable extent. Although a number of 
men were in the derrick when it happened 
all escaped injury. The derrick has been 
repaired and work resumed. Both of the 
wells are expected to strike the oil sand 
within another week at a depth of from 1,400 
to 1,500 feet. 

The Caribou Oil company at a meeting 
held on the 19th ult., levied an assessment 
of 10 cents per share on the capital stock of 
the company. This company is making 
good progress with deepening No. 2 well. 

The change in the time table which went 
into affect last week proves particularly ad- 
vantageous to visitors and businessmen who 
have but a few hours to remain in town. 
The present schedule provides for a train 
leaving Hanford at 10:45 •*■ m., arriving in 
Coalinga at 12:25 *"• m.; the train is held 
over here until 4:20 p. m., arriving at Han- 
ford at 6:05 p. m. For a long time the oil 
men in this field have desired such a change 
in the train service, which will afford them 
opportunity to attend to important mail mat- 
ter the same day on which letters . are 
received. > 

Mr. Guthries has sub-contracted the drill- 
ing of the three wells for the Maine State 
Oil company, At present we cannot say 
who the new contractors are. 

On account of the casing being tight, the 
Fresno-San Francisco company's well No. 3 
was not deepened as was intended, but 
cleaned out. It is pumping again with in- 
creased productiveness. 

R. M. D. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



At Alcalde the Mt. Hamilton has again re- 
newed operations and is making good bead- 
way toward the unknown parts of the earth. 
The Grand Central is drilling at the same 
place. This company is sort of a protege of 
the Independence, Mr. Wishart their super- 
intendent having charge of both. 

Just west of Coalinga the J. L. D. Roberts 
Oil company is spudding in a water well so 
as to have their own supply for future 
development of their property. They are 
planning to go 3,000 feet if necessary, but it 
is expected 1,200 feet will get the oil but no 
chances are to be taken. They are at pre- 
sent hauling their water from the "V" at 
Coalinga, the Southern Pacific company 
hauling a tank of water from Armona for 
them. 

Canfield & Cory are having some little 
trouble with their casing having parted, but 
probably ere this Is published it will be 
whole again. They are about 550 feet 
deep and are encountering very hard quick- 
sands to handle. Blue Diamond is having 
the same trouble having parted their casing, 
but will undoubtedly experience no trouble 
in getting it together again. They are 1,375 
feet deep. 

The Caledonian is shut down indefinitely 
for just what cause no one seems to know; 
one rumor has it there is a law suit and an- 
other has it that the title is not secure. All 
the men are kept on full time and expect to 
go *o work any day. 

The Wabash is now selling oil to the 
Standard since the new pipe-pine is com- 
pleted and have already pumped through 
2,500 barrels of the oil. The well is flowing 
about 125 barrels per day. This pipe line 
will make an outlet for the oil in the south- 
western part of the field and has been much 
needed. 

The Union is running two strings of tools, 
one on No. 2 and one on No. 3; the first Is 
over 1,225 arj d tne second is over 700 feet 
deep. 

The Pennsylvania Mining, Development 
and Operating company is down nearly 700 
feet and making good headway. 

At the O'Donnel & Nathan wells they are 
each drilling over 1,200 feet deep, and 
everything looks as if they will be finished 
inside the limit of time they have to get a 
twenty-five barrel production. It has been 
a very expensive proposition as everything 
has been run to the limit and has made a lot 
of breakages that would not have otherwise 
occured if more time could have been al- 
lowed. 

The Section Seven Oil company is down 
over 800 feet and making good headway on 
their No. 3. They have never been able to 
get No. 2 flowing like old No. 1, but expect 
to before long. No. 1 is still flowing at tte 
rate of over 500 barrels. 

The M. K. & T. Is down 2,600 feet and are 
experiencing a little fishing job, owing to 
oil sand heaving and sticking the tools. 

On the pleasant Valley Stock Farm com- 
panies' property their No. 2 well is down 
over 800 feet and their No. 3 about 300 feet. 

On the Esperanza property they are 
building a large steel tank and putting up 
buildings and getting everything in first- 
class shape for the winter. They have the 
timbers on the ground for their No. 4 and as 
soon as it is ready will commence drilling. 

The St. Paul-San Francisco is cleaning 
out their wells and also putting things in 
better shape. 

The Mercentile Crude have their No. 3 
finished and are bailing to clean out sand 



preparatory to putting It to pumping. They 
havt a showing for a very nice well. 

The San Francisco Crude is rigging up on 
their No. 3 and will probably be spudding 
the first of the week. No. 2 is flowing right 
along and they believe they have the water 
shut out in No. 1 and it will soon be put to 
the test. 

The Genesee Oil company Is rigging up 
and expects to be spudding by the first of 
the week. 

On the McClurg & Claypool property 
they are down over 700 feet on their No. 
4 and making good headway. 

The El Zuma Pura started up their No. 4 
to drilling and shut down, it is rumored, for 
lack of funds, but an assessment has been 
levied and it is expected drilling will be re- 
sumed at once. 

The El Capitan is down about 550 feet 
and have been having troubles of their own 
with caving, holes, etc. 

Maine State No. 6 Is down over 800 feet 
and the timbers for No. 7 are on the ground, 
and as soon as it is ready one of Contractor 
Guthries' crews will start rigging up. 

On the Commercial Petroleum properties 
old No. 1 is holding up to her old rate of 
production and doing nicely. No. 2 Is down 
over 700 feet and No. 3, 650 feet. They 
have been having considerable trouble in 
No. 2 owing to having lost part of an under- 
reamer in the hole which made a nine days' 
fishing job before it was gotten out. 

The Call Oil company is over 800 feet 
deep and are pulling their eight-inch casing 
so as to force the ten-inch down to a lower 
level and shut off some bad bowlders and 
running sand. 

The Plymouth Rock are down about 500 
feet and have been having their share of 
troubles. 

On the Hanford lease they are running 
one string of tools as also is the Independ- 
dence. 

Twenty-eight Oil company is running one 
string of cleaning out tools and one string 
drilling. 

The Roberts Oil company have started 
drilling near the old Star Oil company's 
property. 

The Octave Oil company is considerably 
over the 1, 000- foot mark and are soon ex- 
pected to reach the oil sand. 

The Peerless is drilling on the Caribou 
section and have one string of tools running. 

Scott Blair has a rig up on section 26 east 
of the California Oil Fields, Limited and as 
soon as tools arrive will start drilling. 

The Associated Oil company is getting rig 
timbers and other material on section 14, 
south of Coalinga and will soon be drilling. 

A number of old oil companies are plan- 
ning to drill new wells and within a month 
there will be six or eight more strings of 
tools running. 



It Is to be regretted that the officials 01 
Fresno county are not as enterprising as all 
the other counties where they have oil, in- 
asmuch as Coalinga has the poorest roads In 
the state and it is as bad as a "spell of 
grippe" to take a trip over them, not a 
mile being oiled or in shape to drive over 
without danger of breaking a buggy or up- 
setting. It would seem with the revenue de- 
rived Coalinga might have some little atten- 
tion from the county. 

WALKING BEAM. 



i 



McKittrick, Cat.., Nov. 28, 1903. 

Though this is a season of the year in 
which very little new work is carried on as a 
rule this year is proving an exception to this 
rule to a noticeable extent. 

Ouite a little development is going on; 
companies who have been interested only 
to the extent of being land holders are mak- 
ing preparations to operate, and outside 
interests are beginning to examine the field 
with the idea of making investments. 

There Is a healthy growth of development 
work which Is proving beyond doubt that 
the oil bearing territory extends to the north- 
west along the same general line of strikes 
on which present producing wells have been 
found. And it has also been satisfactorily 
proven that wells encountered in this newer 
territory can hold their own in the produc- 
tion yielded with the older wells of the field. 
This applies both to the quantity of the 
product and its specific gravity. 

That such interests as the Pacific Oil and 
Transportation company are entering the 
field as operators is a most satisfactory sign 
for the future. 

This company is rigging up at present, to 
drill a well on its holdings on section 16, 
township 30 south, range 22 east. While 
little development has been done In this 
direction, this company is making prepar- 
ations to put down a hole several thousand 
feet In depth that a thorough test may be 
made. 

Many people who have made a careful 
study of geological formations here predict 
the unearthing of a large stratum of oil- 
bearing sand at a depth of between 2,000 
and 3,000 feet In this section. 

The Pacific Crude is progressing on its 
No. 3 and from present indications this well 
will easily equal the others as a good pro- 
ducer. 

The Empire well on section 8, township 
30 south, range 22 east, Is down 900 feet and 
in a blue clay. The progress of this well is 
being watched with as much interest as is 
shown in the Pacific Oil and Transportation 
company as both will show up a territory 
comparatively unknown. 

The United States Oil company is putting 
down a new well on the NWj^ of section 6, 

Continued on Page Eleven. 




BATES' 

PATENT CASINO TONGS 



416-1426 19th St., Bakersfield, Cat. 



Fills a long-felt want. No more need of 
pole and rope for screwing up casing. Bates 
Tongs can be applied to the easing anywhere 
in driving or pulling without danger of injury 
or parting casing. 

Set No. i, with any two size jaws from gVa 
to 13 y£ Inches. 

Set No. 2, with any two size jaws from 4 to 
954 Inches. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



OO0O0OOOO<K)<>O<><>OOO<>0<»<>0OO<>O<»0<>O<)0OO0<><K>O00<K><K>O<)O<H>0<>0 

Success of the Oil Made Road. 



Some 



Theoretical Objections to the Use of Oil.- 
J. W. Abbott. 



By 



0000000000(>0<H)<)0<K>0<K>0<K)<)0<><>0<KXX>00<>0(>0<>00<K>0<)<K>000<>(>0<»0<>000»<>0 



OOOOOO 

Public attention was first called to the 
utility of crude petroleum oil in road better- 
ment through experiments made by the 
county of Los Angeles In California in 1898, 
where six miles of road were oiled in that 
year under the direction of the supervisors. 
The sole purpose of this work was to lay 
the dust, which, churned beneath the 
wheels of yearly Increasing travel during 
the long dry seasons in that region, had be- 
come a most serious nuisance. 

The following year this mileage was a 
little more than doubled in that county, and 
other counties in California also began ex- 
periments along the same line. 

From the very first the results obtained 
were so astonishingly successful that the 
practice rapidly increased. It spread through 
every county in Southern California, and 
then began to work north. Now, after five 
seasons, it has extended from near the 
Mexican line, on the south, to Durham, in 
Butte county, on the north, a stretch cover- 
ing sections of quite widely differing cll- 
malic conditions, with an aggregate of about 
750 miles of county roads and city streets 
oiled for one or more years. Oil has been 
used on the principal driveways of Golden 
Gate Park, San Francisco. The mountain 
stage road into the Yosemite National Park 
has been oiled for a distance of thirty miles, 
from its initial terminus at Raymond to eight 
miles above Wawona. 

In California it has now passed the ex- 
perimental stage. More than twenty-five 
counties in that state have already used it, 
and others are preparing to do so during the 
season of 1903. 

Thus far California is the only state which 
has actually adopted the practice. It has 
been tried to a very limited extent in Texas, 
and a few isolated experiments have been 
made in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Indiana, 
Colorado, and the District of Columbia. 
Within the past year also a few experi- 
ments have been reported from England, 
France and Switzerland. 

As already stated, the original motive for 
the use of crude oil on roads was to lay the 
dust. Wherever oil has been tried this pur- 
pose has invariably been accomplished, re- 
gardless of methods adopted or variety of 
oil used. On all kinds of roads where it has 
been applied the dust has ceased absolutely 
for at least an entire season after its appli- 
cation, and if renewed a second year It has 
been abated for that year also and the fol- 
lowing, whether then treated or not. In 
southern California all unite in saying that 
the great bane of life — dust — passed away 
wherever the first application of oil was 
made. The dust raised by passing travel no 
longer comes in at windows or destroys the 
products of field and orchard for inconsider- 
able widths on each side of the road, as it 
formerly did. The report of its effectiveness 
as a dust layer is just as positive and en- 
thusiastic from all sections which have made 
the experiments. 

In California it was soon learned that, in- 
calculably valuable as it was, the laying of 



dust was not the only or even the most 
extraordinary result obtained. It was found 
that when oil was applied it Immediately be- 
gan to bind together all the loose particles 
constituting the road surface, whether clay, 
sandy loam, loose sand, gravel, or the fine 
material on top of macadam. A tough 
stratum formed, resembling an asphalt pave- 
ment. Roads buiit on drifting sand or 
clayey dust, no matter how deep, where trot- 
ting with a buggy was impossible and for a 
pair of strong horses to pull a ton was a very 
laborious process, became indurated, resili- 
ent, and firm, so that driving teams could 
trot with ease and the same pair of horses could 
pull two and a half tons more comfortably 
than they formerly did the one ton. Of 
course, these results were not fully obtained 
Immediately, but they never failed to follow 
persistent treatment with oil. 

At first, while this oiled surface stratum 
was thin, it was often broken through, espe- 
cially in wet weather, but proper repairs and 
subsequent applications of oil thickened and 
strengthened it until it would at all times 
effectually withstand the heaviest and most 
continuous travel. 

Running south from the railroad track in 
the town of Chlno, San Bernardino county, 
Cal., is a piece of road over which every 
season nearly 40,000 tons of sugar beets are 
hauled on their way to the factory, often 
averaging 750 tons a day. The foundation 
of this road is a loose sand, and it has been 
surfaced with a material containing some 
clay. Formerly the loaded wagons often 
stalled and had to be dug out. Now, after 
three seasons of treatment with oil, the road 
is as easy to drive over as a good city street, 
and effectually sustains the heavy travel, 
although the majority of the wagons used on 
it have narrow tires. The benefits of the 
oil were experienced immediately after the 
first application was made, but the surface 
stratum under successive treatments grew 
thicker and firmer until the road has become 
virtually perfect. 

In another place, in the same county, 
several miles distant from the one just 
described, the road runs over drifting sand 
just like the worst to be found on Cape Cod, 
in Massachusetts. It has been treated for 
two seasons with oil, and is now equally as 
good as the other. Both pieces of road were 
visited and carefully examined by the writer, 
who can testify to the almost incredibly sat- 
isfactory results obtained. 

All semi-arid regions are subject to very 
heavy rainfalls at times, which are generally 
called waterspouts. In California these 
have in many places subjected oiled road 
surfaces to the severest posstble tests. Mr. 
Theo. F. White, a civil engineer, one of the 
supervisors of San Bernardino county, a 
man who has had a grsat deal of experience 
in oiled roads and made them a special 
study, tells of one storm occurring in that 
county in which ten and one-half inches of 
rain fell, six inches of it in a single night. 
He savs: 

" The whole country was flooded and it 



gave us a good test of our oiled roads. There 
is a road running into San Bernardino on a 
grade of about six per cent about 300 or 400 
feet from a bench down into a creek bottom. 
The road had been oiled a second season and 
there was a good oiled surface. The water 
rushed down the middle of that road because 
the ditches could not carry such a great vol- 
ume of it, and it did not make a scratch on 
the road, but a half mile south there was a 
road of about the same grade which was so 
badly washed that it could not be used until 
it was repaired — a road that was not oiled. 
Between Pomona and Freeman there was a 
great quantity of water came from a canyon 
and struck the oiled road at right angles at 
one point. It came from the west, and on 
the east side of that road there was a margin 
of six or eight Inches of the surfacing ma- 
terial that the oil had not touched. The rain 
passed over the oiled surface, and when it 
came to that which was not oiled it cut it 
right out. Upon the same road, within the 
city limits of Pomona, the road was surfaced 
with decomposed granite, packed down hard 
and a very nice road during the summer, but 
it had not been oiled. The same storm cut 
it all to pieces. On one stretch of a quarter 
of a mile the road material was fairly washed 
out into the fields alongside the road." 

When they first began to use oil on roads 
in California there was much speculation as 
to whether it would not be found objection- 
able ; but when properly applied and suit- 
able precautions were taken not to use the 
road before it was ready, the theoretical ob- 
jections vanished. When oil was placed 
upon the surface of the road, if vehicles were 
allowed to run over it before it had sunk in 
and become thoroughly incorporated with 
the road material, the wheels picked up the 
oil and threw it in all directions, injuring 
clothing and everything else of a delicate 
nature upon which it fell. After experience 
had taught how to avoid this, no further 
serious difficulties manifested themselves. 

There does not appear to be such a thing 
as dust from an oiled road. Of course, dust 
from outside may blow onto an oiled road, 
but this soon adheres to the oiled surface and 
ceases to rise. 

To determine whether oiled road material 
would produce a stain, the writer repeatedly 
scraped up some from the surface of a road 
which had been treated some months before 
and placed it in a clean white handkerchief. 
Taking the corners of the handkerchief in 
the left hand, the ball of dirt was turned by 
the right hand, so as to compress the con- 
tents as the housewife does her fruit pulp 
when making jelly. After turning until the 
compression was carried as far as the strength 
of the handkerchief would permit, the ball 
was manipulated by the right hand for a 
moment or two. Then retaining one corner 
of the handkerchief in the left hand the 
others were dropped and the handkerchief 
thoroughly shaken. None of the material 
adhered to the handkerchief and no discolor- 
ation could be detected. 

The mud from oil-treated roads, after the 
oil has become thoroughly diffused through 
the material, does not appear to be more ob- 
jectionable than ordinary mud. 

Diligent inquiry about the effect of oiled 
roads on rubber tires failed to disclose any 
complaints, except in cases where the tire 
had come in direct contact with the oil. So 
far from being injurious, the claim is made 
by some that the resiliency of an oiled road 
and the protection against the sharp edges 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



of sand and gravel increase the life of rubber 
tires very materially. 

It has not been uncommon for aspbalt 
pavements in cities to become softened by 
the heat of the sun to such a degree as to 
become injured by the wheels of heavily 
loaded wagons. No difficulty of this charac- 
ter is ever experienced with the surface of 
an oiled road. 

For a short time after oil is applied there 
is a very perceptible odor, which soon disap- 
pears almost eDtirely. While it lasts it is 
not essentially disagreeable, and many peo- 
ple rather like It. 

An Incidental advantage of oil on roads is 
the help to the eyes. The reflection of the 
sun from white road surfaces and the dust 
blown into the eyes are both very trying to 
the eyesight. Oiling gives the road a seal- 
brown color. 

In California oil is found to be very effect- 
ive in preserving the planking of wooden 
bridges. A liberal coat is first given to the 
wooden floor, and upon this is spread a layer 
of sand about an inch deep A very light 
sprinkling of oil is then given to the sand, 
which binds together and forms a layer that 
is not only waterproof, but protects the 
wooden surface from direct contact with the 
wheels of vehicles. 

The growth of oil in popular favor in 
Southern California has been steady and 
rapid. Many of those who have had most 
experience with it have come to regard its 
use in a dry region as the most important 
discovery ever made in road making. Quite 
a considerable number of people have said 
to the writer : " We could not go back to the 
old conditions ; if we had to give up our 
oiled roads we would move away." 



Standard Plans Vast Bnterprlse. 



Stony Point OH Company. 

The Stony Point Coal and Oil Develop- 
ment company met Monday night at the 
office of Attorney J. Hall Lewis for the pur- 
pose of perfecting organization, and elected 
the following officers: President, George 
Berg; vice-president, Dr. F. H. Phillips; 
secretary and treasurer, S C. Hargreaves. 
The members went through the formality of 
transferring to the corporation the lease on 
the Meacham property at Stony point, 
where they expect to bore for oil. Arrange- 
ments were also made to secure a Standard 
rig, and the company will proceed at once 
to operate it. 

James Kearney and George Berg, accom- 
panied by Professor A. S. Cooper, late of 
the miner Uoglcal department of State of 
California, went out to the ranch today. 
They also have with them L. J. Abrams, an 
oil promoter from San Benito county, who 
will look over the ground. Colonel Fair- 
banks will take the parties down Peatluma 
creek to investigate the gas and oil oozings. 



The Standard Oil company is now having 
plans drawn for a refinery to be constructed 
in the Kern River field and which when 
completed will be the largest plant of its 
kind in the world. 

It is known that work on the plans has 
already progressed well nigh to the point of 
completion, and the company is even now 
preparing a site across the Southern Pacific 
spur track, in proximity to the great reser- 
voirs recently built for the colossal new 
refinery. 

There are some urgent reasons that have 
impelled the Standard to locate its largest 
refinery in the Kern River field. It is now 
common knowledge that while the light oil 
from the Coalinga field is readily trans- 
mitted through the pipe line to Point Rich- 
mond, the heavier product of the Kern 
River field is not moved with equal facility. 

In addition to the density of the oil, which 
is a bar to rapid movement through the pipe 
line, the company has been having a deal of 
trouble with sand, and in the past three 
weeks an effort has been made to cleanse 
the pipe Hue by running a distillate through 
it. How successful this has been is not 
known, but the company evidently realizes 
that there will be always more or less diffi- 
culty in transporting the crude oil through 
the line. 

The pipe line will be supplied with oil 
that has been subjected to one 01 two pro- 
cesses that will have separated the heavy 
asphaltum, and that product will receive 
final treatment in the establishment at Point 
Richmond. 

In connection with the matter the "Driller" 
says that they have received information 
that the contract for excavating has already 
been let, and work has in reality been com- 
menced. Efforts were made to have this re- 
port authenticated by the representative of 
the Standard, which was impossible. As 
everyone knows, nothing definite can be 
learned from this company regarding their 
intentions and proposals of business enter- 
prises, and it therefore remains for a news- 
paper to gather the facts as near as possible 
and make every possible Investigation into 
what is actually being done towards this 
end. 

Near the Southern Pacific railroad, and 
just west of the Standard's tanks and 
earthen reservoirs, a town site is being laid 
off, and a number of cottages have been and 
are being erected. A water system is being 
put in, and large supplies of hay and grain 
are being stored here. There is no question 
that this belongs to the Standard company, 
and it goes to prove that something will 
soon be doing in this field. There are many 
other evidences which go to prove that this 
refinery will be constructed. 

It is understood that after this refinery is 
completed it will give employment to more 
than 1,000 men. 



Countervailing Duties on Petroleum 
Products. 

While congress is busily engaged in a con- 
sideration of reciprocity arrangements, there 
is another side to the tariff question of which 
little is said and less is known — the imposi- 
tion of countervailing duties on Imports from 
countries which impose duties on similar 
products of our production. Reference is 
had specifically to the ruling of the board of 
general appraisers in the Java paraffine case, 
in which they held that paraffine Imported 
into this country from Java must pay a 6 
per cent ad valorem tax because the Dutch 
East Indies imposes a "basket" clause duty 
of 6 per cent ad valorem on all non-enumer- 
ated articles, in which class are petroleum 
products. 

The section of the present tariff law which 
governs this matter is known as Paragraph 
626 and is as follows: 

"That if there be imported into the United 
States crude petroleum, or the products of 
crude petroleum, produced in any country 
which imposes a duty on petroleum or its 
products exported from the United States, 
there shall in such cases be levied, paid and 
collected a duty upon said crude petroleum 
or its products so imported, equal to the 
duty imposed by such country." 

It is evident that the recent decision of 
the board of appraisers above referred to 
opens up vast possibilities for the imposition 
of duties on imports of petroleum products 
which have heretofore come in free. With 
this view of the matter the customs division 
of the United States treasury department is 
now making a thorough investigation of the 
tariffs of all the countries of the world, for 
the purpose of ascertaining whether duties 
are levied upon petroleum products under 
the several "basket'' clauses of these tariffs 
as non-enumerated articles. It is expected 
that they will unearth numerous hidden 
tariff charges on petroleum products, and 
that their investigation will necesitate a 
complete revision ol the regulations relating 
to the assessment of countervailing duties on 
petroleum and its manufactures. 



Another Edition of Maps. 

Barlow & Hill, the well known map 
makers of Bakersfield, Cal. are compiling a 
revised edition of their "up-to-date" maps 
which will be issued sometime about the 
first of the year. This set of maps will in- 
clude the Coalinga, Kern River, McKittrlck, 
Sunset-Midway, and Santa Barbara oil 
fields, together with the names and addresses 
of all the reliable oil companies operating in 
them, also a good amount of general in- 
formation. A limited amount of advertising 
will be taken for the booklet, which will be 
nicely bound and neat in appearance. It is 
estimated that 50,000 copies will be circu- 
lated, their former edition having reached 
this figure. The reliability of the maps 
publjshed by this [firm has brought them 
worl d wide renown. 



O I L 

WELL 

SUPPLIES 
EXCLUSIVELY 



AH Fully Equipped We Have 



' THE LARGEST STOCK *^ 



ON THE 



PACIFIC COAST 



R. H. HERRON CO. saT Kiscofck. 




STORES 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



NEWS FROM THE COAST « 

|( Recent Developments in California Fields, u 

Devil's Den. 

The outlook for this district continues to improve. 
Smith & Bryner are going to commence work on 
their second well, which will be about three-quarters 
of a mile to the north and east of their first one. It 
is their intention to drill several wells in this vicinity. 

It is reported that the Gould Central Oil company 
is to resume work on its holdings in 26-18. 

The Western Oil & Refining company, of which 
Spreckles is the leading spirit, is now making prepa- 
rations to sink several wells. This company has been 
idle for some time, but now that several discoveries 
of a very high grade of oil have been made in clost 
proximity to their lands, the word comes that they 
are going ahead on a large scale. 

The Niagara Oil company, which is controlled by 
Hanford and Visalia people, las leased a portion cf 
their land to Smith & Bryner, of Coalinga. 

Chanslor & Canfield have become interested in 
Devil's Den. it is hoped that the energetic spirit 
that has characterized their operations in other fields 
of California will not be found lagging in this 
district. 

Representatives of the Standard Oil company were 



Spellacy, Edward R. Bishop and W. D. Roberts. 

The Linda Vista and the Sunset, both Kern county 
operators, have levied assessments on their stock.' 
The former is operating at Kern River and its assess- 
ment is 2 cents a share. The Sunset is operating in 
the field of that name and has assessed its stock- 
holders at the rate of 5 cents a share. The Caribou, 
a Coalinga company, has levied an assessment of 
10 cents a share. 

The sale of 960 Associated Stock trust certificates 
was reported yesterday on the stock exchange at San 
Francisco. Fort j -five were reported in the mcrning 
and 915 in the afternoon. The price was 19 cents, 
which is lower than what was paid for similar stock 
a few days since. Some well posted oil men express 
doubts as to the genuineness of the reported sales 
of Associated stock at such low prices and think it 
may be simply an attempt to keep a low price be- 
fore the public. About the latter part of January 
the annual report of the directors will be made and 
it is thought that there may be a rise at that time. 

The Wilson Oil company, by Its attorneys An- 
derson & Anderson of Los Angeles and Anderson 
& Eaye of Bakersfield, have filed two new suits 
against the Famosa Oil and Investment company and 
the Kern River Mutual Oil company to recover 
possession of property at the Kern River field held 
by the defendants under a lease. The new suits 
are sequels to those which were brought some 
months t go and decided in favor of the defendants 
by the superior court. The new actions are based 
upon more recent alleged violations of the lease 
contract. The property involves the southwest and 
the southeast quarters of the northwest quarter of 



tent, the railroad company taking a large proportion 
of the product. The production of Coalinga has been 
roughly estimated as something over 2,000,000 bar- 
rels. From this it may be seen that the Fresno 
county fie'd is still far behind the Kern county fields 

The demand for oil lands in the different fields of 
Kern county is increasing every day. Inquiries are 
being received here continually from patties, both 
in and outside of the state, for oil lands, and it is now 
an exceedingly difficult mat'er to purchase or lease 
any in the proven fields. The owners now realize 
that oil is on a solid bs«is and is to be a permanent 
thing and they are no longer anxious to sell, as dur- 
ing the earlier days of the boom. Lands are now no 
longer purchased for the purpose of dispos'ng of 
them to the first purchaser who will pay enough to 
yield a profit on the speculation. Now lands are 
bought or leased only to operate and only by men of 
means who intend to develop them to the fullest ex- 
tent. The only properties that can be had are in new 
fields or in parts of fields but little developed and 
even these are not always easy to get. 

Secretary EUery of the Sterling Oil cotrpany was 
in Bakersfield last Saturday arid visited the com- 
pany's property. After looking over the field Mr. 
Kllery said: "I don't know just when that pick-up 
in the oil business that we hear so much about is 
coming, but I believe in is coming, and it is liable to 
come before we realize it. I know one thing ; I 
never fail to increase my ho' dings in the Kern River 
field whenever the opportunity is presented. My 
opinion of the oil business is as optimistic as ever and 
I do n it believe there is any better investment than 
stock in one of the good oil companies operating in 




Volcan Oil and Refining Company, Bakersfield. 



in this field a few days ago looking over the property 
of various companies, but the object of their visit 
could not be learned. Like the traditional oyster, 
they are not an information bureau. 

A party of surveyors are camped near the mouth 
of the Antelope. Apparently they are making a rail- 
road or pipe-line survey, but the true nature of their 
work C3uld not be learned. 

Kern. 

The Imperial Oil company has declared a monthly 
dividend of 20 cents per share, amounting to $20,- 
000, payable December 7th. 

The Thirty-three Oil cimpany has declared a 
monthly divided of 10 cents per share amounting 
to $10,000, payable December 7th. 

Superintendent Leach of the United Crude was 
in town today and reports that his company has 
jnst finished its second well and that it gives every- 
indication of being a very good producer. 

Immediately following the report that- the Stand- 
ard is about to suspend operations on this end of its 
great pipe line comes the news that it is now refus- 
ing to renew contracts for cil in the field, the com- 
pany's agents giving as a reason that the corporation 
has all the oil it can handle at present. 

The Jerome Oil company, which has been oper- 
ating for some time at McKittrick, filed its articles 
of incorporation under the laws of Arizona with the 
county clerk. The capital stock is $200,000 and the 
limit of indebtedness which the corporation m y 
contract at one time is $100,000. The duration of 
the corporation is twenty-five years. The private 
property of stockholders is not liable for the debts of 
the corporation. The directors and incorporators 
are: E.J. Miley, George Irwin Wapple, Timothy 



the southwest quarter of secion 4, 29-28. The south- 
west quarter is held by the Famosa Oil company 
and the southeast quarter by the Kern River Mutual. 

The Associated is erecting a new boarding house 
at the San Joaquin lease for the employees on that 
property. The building is about seventy feet long 
one way and shaped like a T, and fifty the other. 
The main dining room is about 50x50. The new 
office building is (now nearing completion. It will 
have one large room for the clerks and a private 
office for General Manager Henderson. It has a 
portico nearly all the way around and is painted 
red. Four cottages are being erected for the use 
the officials of the company at the San'Joaquin. 

The California Fortune, located on 34, 12-24 at Sun- 
set, is just commencing to drill its well No. 4. The 
rig is now up for the work. The property adjoin? 
the lands of the Operators and the Beaver com- 
panies. 

As showing the enormous extent cf the oil indus- 
try of Kern county it is estimated by well-informed 
oil men that the production of the Kern River field 
has increesed about 25 per cent during the present 
year and that for 1903 it will exceed 16,000,000 bar- 
rels. Of this amount it may be said, as a conserva- 
tive estimate, that the Associated controls 60 per cent 
of the output. The Southern Pacific and the Stan- 
dard are the heaviest purchasers, and as the former 
now is virtually in control of the Associated, it is easy 
to see what an interest it has in the district. As 
there is perfect accord between the railroad people 
and the Standard, the two may be said to dictate the 
situation. The production at McKittrick is estimated 
at something over 2,000,000 barrels, which is also 
about 25 per cent increase. The same conditions 
prevail at this field as at Kern River to a great ex- 



the Kern River field." Mr. EUery is recognized as 
one of the sensible and successful oil men of the 
state and his hopeful view is in the nature of a tonic 
to some of the holders of oil stock who are getting 
impatient for the boom. 

The Associated has obtained a lease of 120 acres in 
the Coalinga field, where it is drilling two wells at 
present. The property is on section 7-20-15, in the 
heart of the Fresno county field. It adjoins the fa- 
mous 2,000-barrel wells of the Section Seven com- 
pany and is crossed by two pipe lines, by the Stan- 
dard's branch of the great pipe line from Kern River 
to Point Richmond and by the Southern Pacific's. 
The land is thus an excellent property, and it is 
learned that the terms of the lease are very favorable 
the combine paying a royalty of only one-eighth to 
the owners. The oil produced .by adjoining wells is 
about twenty-one gravity. Their depth is not more 
than 1,000 feet. 

The Pittsburg has decided to devote the balance 
of the money received from the sa 1 e of a p rtion of 
its land lo the Fulton to make improvements on the 
remainder of its property and will begin drilling 
wells in the near future. Hitherto the company has 
expended this money in paying d'vidends to its 
stockholders, but with the railroad extending its 
line into the field and passing by the property, it is 
thought that this Is a good time to begin develop- 
ment work. The company has an excellent property 
within the proven oil belt of the Sunset field. The 
fallowing circular is sent to all stockholders: "Bakers- 
field, Cal., Nov. 28, 1903. To the stockholders 
of the Pittsburg Oil company: "The Pittsburg 
Oil company owns more than 800 acres of land 
in what is known as the Sunset oil field in 
Kern county. A suitable portion of this holding 



PACIPIC OIL REPORTER 



is well proven oil land, jSo acres having already 
been patented. In the past there has been no 
means of transporting oil from our territory, bnt at 
the present time there is good reason for believing 
that within the next few months the railroad will be 
extended to near our property. The laying of a 
pipe line through that portion of the field is also 
contemplated, either of which will give ns an outlet 
for our oil, and it is the present policy of the com- 
pany to drill wells and sell its product instead of 
using its cash to pay dividends. The company is 
ont of debt, pays no extravagant salaries, and has 
sufficient cash in the treasury to drill several wells. 
We believe the carrying out of this policy will en- 
hance the value of the property, and trust it will 
meet with the approval of all the stockholders." 

Santa Barbara, 

The Graciosa company is drilling away on its see- 
on well and the indications are favorable for striking 
oil. 

The Southern Pacific company which has been 
idle for some time has again started up. The com- 
pany is drilling near Caamalia station. 

The derrick for Western Onion well No. 18 is in 
shape now and everthing in readiness to begin drill- 
ing. A number of the old wells are being cleaned. 

Mr. Hall, who is operating on the Foster place and 
not the Kaiser property as was stated erroneously in 
our last issue, has begun sinking his second well. 

Work continues on the Santa Maria Oil and Gas 
company's well No. 2 and judging from the gas and 
foru-ation it is very probable that oil will be found. 

The California Coast company, operating under 



Sargcnt'a. 

The well of the Watsonville Oil company at Sar- 
ge^ts is no longer an experimnet. The many ob- 
stacles occasioned by the filling in of the sand and 
other impediments to progress have been overcome 
and now the pump is showing a daily production 
of 175 barrels. The company will have no diffi- 
culty in disposing of it* oil, no matter how great 
the quantity may be, for the comparative tests be- 
tween the product of the Sargent field and the 
fields of Kern county which were made by the 
eastern experts fercral months ago, showed that the 
Sargent oil is very much superior in nearly every 
respect. One expert gave out figures showing the 
output of this district to be worth two and one-half 
times that of the Kern fields. 



BVANSTON, Wvo , November 30, 1903. 

Mr. EDITOR.— Believing as I do in the usefulness 
of the average newspaper, in spreading the news and 
disseminating truth, I was a little set back, a short 
time ago, when paying a business visit to Utah, to 
learn that the oil industry of that state was being 
boomed, somewhat at the expense of truth, as relate 
to conditions that exist in this state. 

When asked as to the conditions existing here, 
looking to the fulfillment of our predictions, that 
this field is superior in every way both aa to quality 
and quantity of oil, I replied that we were all right, 
which statement was accepted as a 'huge joke' (I 
copy this from the theatrical paper on the wall). I 
was told that our field was played out, we had no 
producing wells, etc., and that we were only laying 
for suckers. This and much more was dished up to 



To ship oil over the Union Pacific railroa. 
quires the pull of all pulls, t';., "standir g in." The 
company will supply tank cars that hold 5,000 bar- 
rels, if a tank can be filled in one day, in other 
words, they will Dot let out one of these cars, to In- 
filled at leisure. Again, our wells are all pumping 
propositions and a pumping plant erected in the 
center of the wells will pump fifty wells as well as 
one or two. These are all matters of commercial im- 
portance and the men behind the development of 
tiis field arc alive to their interests, and are keeping 
up their end In consideration of the fact that to 
purchase a "rig" and sink a well to the depth of 
1,200 feet invjlves an expenditure of about $10,000, 
to say nothing of the other expenses incidental, and 
the fact that we have twenty wells in the vicinity of 
Spring Valley, should keep the small investors that 
have bought a few shares of stock, from getting 
"cold feet." In conversation with Mr. R. S. 
Spenre, who is posted on the situation, in this field, 
as well or better than any man here, he informs me 
that this field is the most promising of any new field, 
and that, upon the best authorltive information, a 
refinery is to be erected here in the early spring, 
lie also informs me that Spring Valley is not the 
only productive p rt of the field, but that down Bear 
river, on the Wyoming and Utah sides of the state 
line, oil has been encountered lately, at depths 
ranging from 20 to 100 feet, and of the finest quality . 

Our city is now full of gentlemen from California 
and the east, laying plans and making purchases 
for the early spring work, and a boom in land and 
stocks, is sure to come with the green grass, and 
such a boom that the Wall street Bears, cannot 
affect, or interfere with. 

OILY GAMMON, ESQ, 
(To be continued in our next.) 





One of the Long Trains of Tank Cars That Leaves Kern River Daily. 



the management of h. A. Crandall is going right 
ahead on the Drutnm property. It is probable that 
the company will sink a second well in the near 
future. 

The Brookshire company is down 1,200 feet and 
the outlook for a fine well is excellent indeed Well 
No. 1 continues to supply the adjacent companies 
with water and in order to supply the increased 
demand, a new and more powerful pump will be 
installed. 

The drillers on well No. 2 of the Union Oil com- 
pany are working night and day and are down 1,400 
feet. Gas and seepages are encountered daily. 
The formation continues practically the same as in 
well No. 1 only that the liquid asphaltum, which 
was encountered in the first well was not met in this 
one. 

Mr. Auchie A. Cunningham, the chemist and ex- 
pert, is now at work at the reffnery of the Columbian 
Oil, Asphalt & Refining company at Carpenteria, 
making s- me changes in the plant that will enable 
the company to refine the distillates into higher and 
more merchantable products. He finds that the ores 
in that section are rich in the qualities that go to 
make the higher grades of lubricants. 

The Pinal company has its well No. 4 in fine 
shape and is now ready to be turned on as soon as 
the Standard Oil company's tank at Port Harford is 
completed. Well No. I has been completed all but 
sinking the casing. No. 3 will be cleaned out this 
coming week and also gotten ready to aid in filling 
the 120,ooo-banel contract. The derrick for well No. 
5 is finished and as soon as the necessary machinery 
is in place spudding in will begin. No 2 will be 
deepened in a few weeks. 



me in good style, a la newspapers. 

I have now determined to take up my pen and 
write; believing you will tell the truth as I give it to 
you, without any embellishment. 
Uinta county is, without doubt, the best prospective 
oil field in the county. In 1901 oil was first dis- 
covced here, and operations commenced, in a small 
way, to demonstrate the worth of the discovery. 
That year the boom was started, by locating land 
and organizing companies to get the capital neces- 
sary for its development. In 1902 active operations 
were commenced, and the most hopeful expectations 
measurably realized. Today we have eleven pro- 
ducing wells and nine more in course of construc- 
tion. Our firished wells, without shooting, will 
produce from 60 to 200 barrels each per day, and 
when shot wi 1, without doubt, double that output. 
Buildings have been erected, storage tanks con- 
structed, and everything done, that time and money 
could accomplish, in so short a time. The total ex- 
penditure up to date, in Spring Valley and vicinity, 
exceeds $1, 000,000. The corporations that have 
spent the major part of this money, are made up of 
OIL MEN, who have made both fame and fortune, in 
the oil industry. I refer respectfully to Joe Chan- 
cellor, A. H. Butler, C. A. Canfield, et al, also the 
Hearst estate, of California. 

Wells are being sunk, every train from the east 
brings us carloads of machinery, the hum of busi- 
ness fills the air, and we are it. 

And now, a little weakling, that evidences his 
strength in a country newspaper, bobs up and "butts 
in" with this interrogatory, "why don't you ship 
some oil, and show us?" I don't answer, but being 
by nature endowed with "Gacoethes scribendi" I 
reply to all your patient readers, as follows: 



Continued from Page Seven. 



township 30 south, range 22 east, after a 
period of suspended operations. 

Del Monte 54 is nearing completion and 
promises to be much the same kind of a well 
as those of the Pacific Crude, whose territory 
lies adjacent. 

The Kern River Oil company is about to 
re-perforate its No. n. Some months ago a 
new string of 5^i was put in as inner cas- 
ing, but stress of other business has pre- 
vented the management from perforating 
until now. 

Giant No. 10 is making satisfactory pro- 
gress again, after a two weeks' delay due to 
the parting of a string of six-inch drive pipe. 

Reward No. 3 is uearing completion, be- 
ing in the sand at present. This will pro- 
bably be a better producer than No. 2, which 
has flowed to no mean extent during the 
past few days. 

Berry & Keller well No. 3 is 650 feet deep 
and in the brown shale overlying the oil 
sand. This company is contemplating lay- 
ing a plp« line to the Associated tanks on 
the Giant lease. 

No. 7 of the San Francisco & McKittrick 
has recently been completed and is proving 
an excellent producer. The production of 
No. 4 has been increased by cleaning out 
that well. The rig is up for No. 8, and 
drilling will begin on this well in a very 
short time. 

M. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



U. M. THOMAS 

318 Pine Street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

OIL LANDS 

Successor to the Land De- 
partment of the 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Buy and sell oil land in 
all the proven oil belts 
of California. 



Coalinga Lands a Specialty 



AMERICAN CONSOLIDATED 
Oil Company 

A. B. Butler, J. A. Chanslor, 

President -Vice President 



13,750 shares of stock for sale at 
8 cents per share — par value $1.00 



P. W. SPAULDING 

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW 

Evanston - Wyoming 



613 Market St., San Francisco. 

ALL THE WAY 



Santa Fe 

% W 



CHICAGO 
In 3 Days 



7:30 



Trains leave Union Ferry Depot, San Fran- 
cisco, as follows: 

A. M.— *BAKERSFIEI,D LOCAI,; Due 
Stockton 10:40 a. m., Fresno 2:40 p. m., 
Bakersfield 7:15 p. m. Stops at all points 
in San Joaquin Valley. Corresponding 
train arrives 8:55 a. m. 

9aa A. M.-g"THE CALIFORNIA UMIT- 
*«lll ED ;" Due Stockton 12:01 p. m., Fresno 
• wv 3:20 p. m., Bakersfield 6:00 p. m., Kansas 
City 3rd day 2:35 a. m., Chicago 3rd day 
2:15 p. m. Palace Sleepers and Dining 
Car through to Chicago. No second class 
tickets honored on this train. Corres- 
ponding train arrives °ii:io p. m. 
A. M.— *VAX,I < EY LIMITED; Due 
Stockton 12:01 p. m., Fresno 3:20 p. ni! 
Bakersfield 6:00 p. m. The fastest train 
in the Valley. Carries Composite and 
Reclining Chair Car. No second class 
tickets honored on this train. Corres- 
ponding train arrives 11:10 p. m. 
P. M.— * STOCKTON LOCAL; Due 
Stockton 7:10 p. m. Corresponding train 
arrives 11:10 a. in. 

P. M.— "OVERLAND EXPRESS ; Due 
Stockton 11:15 P- m-. Fresno 3:15 a. m v 
Bakersfield 7:35 a. m , Kansas City 4th 
day 7:00 a. m ., Chicago 4th day 8:47 p. m. 
Palace and Tourist Sleepers and free Re- 
clining Chair Cars through to Chicago. 
Also Palace Sleeper -which cuts out at 
Fresno. Corresponding train arrives 
4:25 p. m. 

\ Mondays and Thursdays 
Tuesdays and Fridays. 
Personally Conducted Parties for Kansas 
City, Chicago and East leave on Overland Express 
Monday, Thursday and Saturday at 8:00 p. m. 
Ticket Offices, 641 Market Street and in Ferry 
Depot, San Francisco ; and 1112 Broadway 
Oakland. 



9:30 

4:00 
8:00 

* Daily 



Have You Securities 



that pay no dividends and you wa 
some that do? If you want to buy, si 
or exchange investment stocks, or if y< 
want gilt-edge shares in operating com- 
panies, address the Debenture Surety 
Company, Rialto Bldg., San Francisco, 
which also incorporates, finances and 
operates good enterprises. 



The REPUTATION, 



we have made for our 



ASPHALT 



Js UNEXCELLED 

WHY? Because years of experience have taught us how to 
make it THE BEST. 

nnnnnn 

Our product is known to all large Contractors ; You can 

tread on it in New York, as well as in San 

Francisco. We also ship it to 

Canada and abroad. 



nnnnnn 

We can AT LEAST meet any quotation 
made for good ASPHALT. WHY ? 
Because we own miles of oil territory in 
Sunset District and pipe the oil from our 
wells direct to our refinery. We handle it from the well to the car. 



REGARDING 
PRICES: 



Will be pleased to send samples and quotation on all grades 
from Liquid to the very Hardest. 



JEWETT & BLODGET, 

BAKERSFIELD, CAL. 



TO THE EAST 



SUNSET ROUTE 

Means a Trip Taken 

IN COMFORT 

Oiled Track==No Dust 
Oil-Burning Engines 
No Cinders 
No Frost==No Snow 

SUNSET LIMITED 

San Francisco to New Orleans 

EYEBY DAY 

Dining car, meals a la carte 

Observation Car 

Vestlbuled Pullman Sleepers 
Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, 

El Paso, San Antonio, 

Houston, Beaumont and 

Texas Oil Fields. 



Southern Pacific 



■LIGHTNING WELL MACHr 

"■S THE STANDAR D, 

HAM PUMPS. AIR LIFTS. ,.1 I 
GASOLINE ENGINES 'j&.-fS^ 

JNRITE FOR CIRCULAR 113 Bgiujj^ 

ITHE AMERICAN WELL WORKS 1: ",""" 

AURORA. ILL -CHICAGO.- DALLAS.TEX 



Oil Companies 

WE 
DO 
JOB 
PRINTING 

Pacific Oil Reporter 

318 Pine Street 



Notice of Assessment. 



HIGH GRAVITY OIL COMPANY; 
Principal place of bus'ness, city and 
county of San Francisco, State of Cali- 
fornia. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meet- 
ing of the Board of Directors of the 
High Gravity Oil Company held on the 
18th day of November A. D. 1903, an 
was levied upon the capital stock of the 
corporation, payable immediately to the 
Secretary of the corporation at its office 
No. 423 Market street, in the city and 
county of San Francisco, State of 
California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment 
shall remain unpaid on the 23rd day of 
December, 1903, will be delinquent and 
advertised for sale at public auction and 
unless payment is made before, will be 
sold on Wednesday the 13th day of 
January A. D. 1904, to pay the delinquent 
assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors. 
D. ROSENBLUM, Secretary. 
Location of office No. 423 Market 
street, city of San Francisco, State of 
California. 



THE NATIONAL SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

Oil Well Supplies 
Drilling and 
Fishing Tools 

Fitler Cables-best in tbe world 

We carry in stock heavy 75^-ln., 5$-6-in. and 
4^2-in. Boston Casing, in addition to all the 
standard sizes and weights. 6-in., 8-in. and 
10-in. Boston Drive Pipe always on hand. 

Pacific Coast Headquarters 

117 North Main Street 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Branches: 

Bakersfield and McKlttrlck, al. 



PACIFIC OIL RRrORTBR 



I ANNOUNCEMENT 1 

* is 



iff 1* 

to W 

;j Od January first, 1904, the PACIFIC OIL REPORTER $ 

jjj will issue a Special New Year's Edition, covering the !}! 

ifc 't x 

U, progress made in all of the California oil fields during w 

v|> the year 1903, and the outlook for the coming year, -[J 

v j' together with reliable figures on the output, etc. i\\ 

xi( This edition will be superbly illustrated and will w 

»J> contain articles by those most prominent in the oil JJJ 

Jjj industry. From 25,000 to 30,000 copies will be circu= w 

to * 

to lated. Secure your advertising space at once, as it is Jg 

to •'• 

vji already being rapidly taken. '[} 

* s 



14 



PACIFIC Oil, REPORTER 



Add Fifteen Per Cent. 

The Beku oil combination, engineered 
by the Nobel and Rothschild interests, 
has added fifteen per cent to the prices 
of oil throughout Russia. The repres- 
entatives of the combinations claim the 
increase in price has been compelled by 
the recent labor troubles in Baku and the 
many fires in the oil fields. The official 
returns, howevr, show that this year's 
output has only been decreased by 20 
pcods. 

The Moscow Gazette de .lares that the 
combination is keeping back immense 
reserves which do not appear in the 
official report. It is believed here that 
Russia is threatened with another period 
of high prices, similar to those prevail- 
ing from 1897 to 1900. The Gazette 
urges the government to lease to private 
Russian companies the Bibiebay prop- 
erty, the annual capacity of which is 
200,000,000 poods. 



Up-to-date maps of Kern River 
McKlttrick, Sunset-Midway and 
Coalinga fields for sale at this of- 
fice. Large blue prints, $1.50; 
small maps, 25 cents each. 



The Pacific Oii, Reporter is 
the only oil paper on the coast. 
Subscription $2.50 a year. 



California Stock and Oil 

Exchange. 

The following were the stock sales in 
the California Stock and Oil Exchange 
in the formal sessions held for the week 
ending Wednesday, December 2nd. 

ASSOCIATED OID CO. STOCK 
TRUST CERTIFICATES. 

960 at 19 I 182 40 

200 at 19 (S 30) 3800 

HOME OIL. 

400 at 97X ■ 39° °° 

Soo at 95 475 00 

INDEPENDENCE. 

500 at 16 (B 10) 8000 

LION. 

1,500 at 03 45 00 

MONARCH. 

1,100 at 47 51700 

100 at 48 4800 

OCCIDENTAL OIL. 

2,000 at 19 38000 

1,067 at *° 21200 

167 at 18 3006 

SOVEREIGN. 

600 at 39 23400 

STERLING. 
50 at 2 65 132 50 

SUPERIOR. 

3,400 at 06... 20400 

TOLTEC. 
1,000 at 20 20000 

13,544 Shares Amount, $3,169.96 

SAN'Y RED. WORKS. 

250 at 125 312 00 

HDTCHINSON-SUGAR. 

5oat 09^ 494 

UNITED R. R. BONDS (4's). 
1,000 at 77 50 l77,5oo 00 

1,300 Shares Amount I77, 816.94 

The monthly record of sales since 
January 1, 1903, is as follows: 

Shares. Value. 

January 267,019 $255, 202 

February 322,443 219,358 

March 199,908 151,982 

April 236,268 115,571 

May 401,454 154,386 

June 154,720 117,928 

July 74,594 71,890 

August 181,478 119,231 

September 146, 123 74,455 

200 at 100 00 (B 90) 200 00 

100 at 97K (S 60) 97 5o 

INDEPENDENCE. 

4,o5oat 16 64800 

100 at 15 (B 5) 1500 



KERN, 
goat 475 42750 

MONTE CRISTO. 

56at 77% 43 40 

OIL CITY PETROLEUM. 



Stock Quotations. 

Following are the latest quotations for 
stocks of oil companies listed on the Cal- 
ifornia Stock and Oil Exchange: 

Oil Stocks, Bid. Asked. 

Alma 1-32^ 

Apollo 42 .45 

Asso. Oil Co Stk. Tr. 

Certificates 18 .20 

Aztec .80 

Bay City II 

Bear Flag 

California Standard , 

Caribou 95 

Central Point Con 

Chicago Crude 19 

Clalremont 24 

Esperanza - 

Fauna 02 

Four 

Fulton 450 

Giant 

Hanf ord 130.00 

Home .92% r.oo 

Homestake 

Imperial » 

Independence 15 .16 

Junction 

Kern 5 00 

Kern River 

Lion .04 

Monarch of Arizona... ,45 

Maricopa 10 

McKittrick 

Monte Cristo , 80 

Nevada .35 . „.. 

Occidental of West Va 19 20 

Oil City Petroleum 27 .28 

Peerless 13-75 1400 

Petroleum Center 

Piedmont 

Pittsburg 15 20 

Reed Crude 39 

Reed Crude, New Issue 

S. F. & McKittrick 

San Joaquin O. & D.. . 4.0J 4.50 

Senator .75 

Shamrock 

Sovereign 38 .39 

Sterling 2.50 2.70 

Sunset (Or) 12 .15 

Superior .05 .07 

Teck 1. 10 

Thirty-three . 

Toltec 20 

Twenty-eight 4.00 4.20 

Union 

United Petroleum 

West Shore 

Western Petroleum 

Wolverine 



The Pacific Oil Reporter is 
the only oil paper on the coast 
Subscription $2.50 a year. 



UNION 
PACIFIC 

Suggests 

Speed 
and 
Comfort 

S. F. Booth, Gen. Agent. 

1 Montgomery St., 6. F. 

Phone,' Exchange 300. 



Private flooms 



Phone Main 5966 



Jules Wittmann 



Jules' Restaurant 



Regular Dinner with wine, 75c. 
Sundays and Holidays, $1.00. 



315-317-319=321-323 

Pine St,. S. F. 



Open Evenings 
Music Sundays 



...1 


( 


o> :::::si33 Oil Ov Twp.a.-S,H.a.Ei«T. 






W 


r^A 


PtlMUW 




OAiiro, 




1 
s 


i 

I 


£ f 

_■! I 1 J.c R R. Co U a Tan D v/mj 

.J..MK 




Ron CaDK Rrapro Bauam K 
V tt'ra _ ohlH 1 


JK 


Pnrnsjv Dn. Co. 

!i. a is.--.', to. | 






41 JCfOUlB 




■^^^OIL CITY. 5S=X^ 



FOR SALE 



IN 



KERN RIVER, Cheap 

Section 2, 29-28. 



Shaded portion map shows 40 acres three-fourths mile east of 
DISCOVERY WELL. U. S. Patent 22 years. EASY TERMS. 
Cheapest in Kern River. Write at once, 

WESTERN R. 1, CO., 

Room 36 Chronicle Bldg., 

San Francisco. 



THE 

Pacific Oil Reporter 

is the only 
OIL JOURNAL 
Published on the 
Pacific Coast. 

It gives full, fresh and authentic oil news from 
all the oil districts, new and old. It exposes 
fraudulent oil companies. It gives the latest 
information on oil stocks and dividends. It 
describes the latest method of drilling wells, 
pumping, piping and storing oil; use of oil for 
road making, etc. 

The subscription price is $2.50 a year. If you 
are interested in any way in California oil, cut 
out the following coupon, fill in the blank lines, 
and send it, accompanied by check, money 
order or express order to the 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine St. San Francisco 



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PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

31S Pine Street, San Francisco. 

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Signed- 



Address 
Date 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 5. No. 6. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., SATURDAY. UKCKMBER 12. IQ03. 



Prick, Tkn Crnts. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Psbllahad Wcekljr 

The 00 Authority of the P<dGc ComM. 

I. adorned B» California Pnlrnlaaai Miner*' Aaaoclatloa 



MRS. MARIA ROSA WINS, Proprietor. 

K. S. BASTMAN, 

■ r tn(\ Businet* Maniger 

OFP1CB AND KDITORIAL ROOKI 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco, California 

Telephone. Bash 176. 

TKRMS 

Owe Year $2 5° 

Six Months I 50 

Tuaxs Months I 00 

Sl*QLB Copies 10c 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 

Money should be sent by Postal Order. Draft jr Registered 
Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil Reporter, 318 Pine street, San 
Frandsco, rooms 51-31-33. Communications must be accomcanled 
by writer's name and address, not necessarily for publication, 
but as a (Fuarantee of (rood faith. 

Kntered in the Postofflce at San Francisco, California, *• sec- 
ond class matter 

EXTENDING COALINGA FIELD. 

A private letter received at this office from 
a reliable gentleman at Coalinga, says that it 
is becoming known in that field that the M. 
K. & T. Oil company has actually developed 
a good well on section 8-20-15, about a mile 
southeast from the wells en section 7. This 
company has been working on its well for 
nearly two years and has had all kinds of 
trouble with heaving sands, parted casings, 
lost tools, etc. The operations of the com- 
pany so far away from what was supposed 
to be the horizon of available sands has occa- 
sioned all kinds of talk among the doubters, 
of which the Coalinga field has its full quota. 
We hope the report is true, for it means more 
to the field, perhaps, than any other strike 
ever made there. It will prove several 
hundred acres on the West Side besides re- 
ward the M. K. and T. company for its 
laborious and expensive task. The well is 
about 2600 feet deep. 

Then there is a prospect of soon extending 
the field several miles to the south and east 
of the town of Coalinga, if the work of 
several well known companies should prove 
successful. The Associated has already be- 
gun the erection of derrick, buildings, etc., 
on section 24, 21-15, fi ve miles southeast of 
the town while on section 10, in the same 
town, a water well has been sunk and a der- 
rick Is being erected as a prliminary to active 
drilling operations soon to begin by a well 
known oil man whose identity will be made 
knowu in a short time. Altogether It looks 
as though the Coalinga field was very much 
on the extension order at present. 

THE ROCKEF ELLE R FORTUNE. 

In 1855, at the age of sixteen years, J. D 
Rockefeller's wealth is estimated to have 
been about $100. In ten years it had in- 
creased to something like $5,000. Another 
ten years and it had swelled to the million 
mark, and, at the present time is estimated 
at $[,000,000,000. At the rate these mil- 
lions are now growing the Rockefeller for- 
tune will have reached the enormous sum 
of $14,000,000,000,000 by the year 1955, one 
hundred years from the time J. D. started 
with $100 and a scheme. 



LIGHT COAL IMPORTATIONS. 



Since the steamship Sonoma left there has 
been the following arrivals of coal from 
Australia, viz.: William Tillie, 2,931 tons: 
Alsterschwan, 3,720 tons; Krnest Legouve, 
3,000 tons; total, 9,621 tons. There are at 
present twenty-one vessels on the engaged 
list to carry coal from Sydney and New- 
castle, with a carrying capacity of about 
60,000 tons; ten of these vessels should ar- 
rive here this year. The light deliveries for 
the past thirty days have materially re- 
duced the quantity of Australian coal now 
on hand. There is nothing due to arrive 
here for over sixty days after the cargoes 
now afloat have come to hand. Nine new 
names have been added to the coal carrying 
list since the beginning of the month, but 
some of the vessels listed will not load be- 
fore April or May next, hence the quantity 
of Colonial coal In store here, will be very 
slim at that time, the Southern Pacific com- 
pany are in the market for steam grades and 
are paying fair prices for same. There is a 
variance of opinion as to whether the for- 
mer duty on coal will be renewed, its re- 
newal will prove detrimental to the profit- 
able Importations of British Columbia and 
Australian coals, and will prove a material 
draw-back to our local manufacturing in- 
terests where steam coals are consumed. 
The small amount of money formally re- 
ceived by the United States Government for 
duties is seriously counter balanced by the 
benefits derived by fuel consumers by the 
remission of 67 cents per ton. 



KEEP DOWN THE PRODUCTION. 



While it is true that the oil production in 
the east is falling off it cannot be said that 
there is a likelihood of any immediate in- 
crease in demand for California fuel oil, as 
compared with the enormous production. 
Kern River east side fields will have pro- 
duced over 16,000,000 barrels of oil by the 
close of the year, McKittrlck over 1,000.000, 
Sunset 1,000,000 and Coalinga about 4,000,- 
000. Other fields in the state will bring the 
total production up to something over 25,000,- 
000 barrels. Thus it will be seen that Kern 
River is producing over one-half of the total 
amount. Over 3,000,000 barrels of this is 
now in tanks and reservoirs and rapidly 
accumultaing owing to the Standard running 
nothing but Coalinga oil through the pip« 
line. Unless producers in the Kern River 
field will band together and keep down the 
production the present low prices will pre- 
vail on all oil produced from the field as that 
oil will not enter the market against the 
eastern deficiency, while the Coalinga oil 
will. Kern River oil will remain a fuel 
proposition for the present, dependent on 
the demand for fuel oil. 



PLANT OF OIL NEWS BURNS. 



We note with regret that the plant of the 
Coalinga Oil News was burned to the ground 
in the fire at Coalinga last week. We shall 
hope for the appearance of that enterprising 
paper on time this week. 



Big Strike at Half Moon. 



Reliable information reaches us of the 
opening up of a gusher well by the Fountain 
Oil company, on the ridge overlooking Half- 
Moon Bay. This is one of the most important 
strikes in the history of the California oil 
fields and opens up a most Important oil dis- 
trict producing a high gravity oil. Previous 
good strikes have been made in the district, 
but none that have so thoroughly demons- 
trated the vast wealth of that tettlon. The 
"Chronicle" has the following Interesting 
editorial on the subject that will be of In- 
terest to many of our readers. 

"The opening of a "gusher" oil well on the 
ridge overlooking Halfmoon bay brings the 
productive oil belt of the State materially 
further north and places San Mateo in the 
list of petroleum-producing counties. The 
discovery is a noteworthy one, as it tends 
strongly to confirm the belief that wherever 
formations favorable to the existence of pe- 
troleum exist in the State oil will sooner or 
later be developed there in paying quanti- 
ties. The area of such formations is much 
more extensive than the partially explored 
territory represented in the Southern Cali- 
fornia and the so-called Kern and Fresno 
counties' oil belts. The former embraces the 
developed districts in Los Angeles, Ventura, 
Santa Barbara, and San Luis Obispo coun- 
ties. The latter extends through Kern, 
Fresno, San Luis Obispo, San Benito and 
Santa Cruz counties, and the San Mateo de- 
velopment is undoubtedly an extension of 
the same measures, as it lies in the correct 
trend. A well at Sargent's, in Santa Cruz 
county, which lies in the same belt, is now 
producing at the rate of 175 barrels per day. 

Between the productive wells at Half 
Moon Bay and Sargent's and the most north- 
erly oil-producing district in Fresno county 
a large area of unexplored territory lies. 
Exploration is, however, about to begin on 
an extensive scale in San Benito county, and 
a wealthy Baltimorean is preparing to bore 
for oil near Seaside, about three miles from 
Monterey, where the indications are consid- 
ered exceedingly favorable. A well is to be 
bored at the latter place to a depth of at least 
1,000 feet, at an expected cost of $9,000, to 
prospect the land. It is now generally con- 
ceded among oil experts that California con- 
tains the largest area of oil-bearing ground 
of any state in the union, while Its measures 
give most promise of permanent produc- 
tivity." 

The oil was encountered at a depth of but 
850 feet and the oil gushing over the surface 
pipe formed a stream which reached the 
boilers situated some distance from the well, 
and in an instant the gas was ignited and a 
terrific explosion occurred which shot a pillar 
of flame one hundred feet skyward, reaching 
the derrick and adjoining buildings and 
hurling the workmen violently in different 
directions, injuring four of them. The in- 
jured are Robert Kidd, Roy Parker, Edward 
Hanadan and James Gowan. Parker's 
wounds are most serious and he was removed 
to Half Moon Bay for medical treatment. 

The damage to the derrick, machinery and 
adjacent buildings will amount to several 
thousand dollars. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



Meteods of Testing Petroleum 
Products. 



i. The transparency of the oil in a thin 
layer is to be determined by allowing it to 
run off on to a glass surface. 

2. The specific gravity can serve only as a 
characteristic for the classification of mineral 
oils of certain well known origin and also as 
a test of identity and comparison. The de- 
termination of this characteristic is retained. 

3. Limitation of the specific gravity with 
regard to the method of employment is not 
necessary. Only when oils of certain origin 
are desired are definite gravity limitations 
established for the purpose of. classification. 
These, however, must not be drawn too 
narrow. 

4. The determination of the specific grav- 
ity is effected according to the kind and 
quantity of the material and the desired de- 
gree of accuracy according to the well known 



described for time a gauged stand glass, 40 
mm. in width and 60 mm. in height, is filled 
with oil up to 30 mm. If the surface of the 
oil kept for one hour at -|- 15 C. is unaltered 
after turning the glass for two minutes then 
the oil is to be designated as salve like, 
otherwise as fluid. 

8. In these experiments it is also recom- 
mended to test the first sample in the original 
condition, the second sample after heating 
the oil in a boiling water bath. 

9. The designation "degree of fluidity" 
(viscosity) and the former numerous means 
of expression are retained. 

10. The use of the Engler contrivance is 
retained. 

11. The permanence of the proof in using 
Engler's contrivance by determining the 
time of efflux of 50 ccm. and 100 ccm. is 
shortened, is permissible for thick flowing 
oils, but for the more fluid oils only permis- 
sible as the control examination against the 



shaking with chloride of calcium and filter- 
ing through a dry filter, or by careful heat- 
ing in an open saucer up to 110° C, until 
flowing quietly. A definite determination 
is carried out with the drained oil. 

16. The determination of the freezing 
point depends upon the demands by the 
consumers. 

17. No alterations have been proposed in 
the existing arrangements for the determina- 
tion of the so-called freezing point. 

18. In the numerous comparisons of the 
flowing capacity through the U pipe method, 
the pipe with of 6 mm., 50 mm. water pres- 
sure, one minute pressure influence and also 
10 mm. minimum aseent are retained. 

19. Preliminary treatment of the samples. 
For the consideration of the alterations of 
freezing point made through the influence 
of the temperature, the samples (two separ- 
ate experiments) are not only to be tested 
[in the condition at delivery but also after 




A Pumping-Jack in the Kern River Field. 



proceedings (officially gauged areometer, 
pyknometer, Mohr's method, areometer for 
small quantities of oil, alcohol floating pro- 
ceeding, etc.) 

5. For this determination -|- 15 C. is es- 
tablished as the unit of temperature and 
water of -[- 4 C. is established as the stand- 
ard of weight. 

6. The establishment of the consistency 
in a reagent glass 15 mm. wide filled up to 
30 mm. is sufficient for technical business 
purposes. The first sample is to be exa- 
mined in an unheated condition, the second 
sample after slowly heating in a boiling 
water bath. Both samples, immediately 
after the conclusion of the treatment, are 
exposed for an hour in a water bath of the 
temperature observed to be adapted to the 
practical requisites. The consistency is then 
ascertained by revolving the test glasses. 

7. For technical taxing purposes (esta- 
blishment of the tax) the method of proced- 
ure described in the book of rates is some- 
times employed. According to the method 



efflux time of 200 ccm. If lacking a suffi- 
cient quantity of oil one can work with a 
smaller amount than 240 ccm. and by the 
use of logarithms can reckon the efflux of 
time of 200 ccm. When this happens the 
amount of oil filled in is added in the 
report. 

12. In machine and railway oils the de- 
terminations are made at 20° and 50° C, in 
cylinder oils at ioo c C. and 150 to 180° C. 

13. In order to remove unusually great 
impurities, the oils are poured through a 
sieve with meshes 1-3 mm. in width, previous 
to the examination. Very thick oils are 
slightly heated for this purpose. 

14. An observation on the residuum found 
in the result of the test is to be taken up. 
In all determinations of the degree of fluidity 
the upper openings of the efflux pipe is to 
be examined, both before and after the test, 
in order to ascertain whether impurities 
(especially fibers) are present or not. 

15. Oils containing water are to be 
drained before the examination either by 



slowly heating for ten minutes up to about 
50 C. With the oil tested in the heated 
condition the test is to be repeated unless 
the oil has proved satisfactory in the first 
test. 

20. After every treatment the oil found in 
the U pipe should remain for an hour in 
water of 20 C. before it undergoes a new 
test. 

21. All preparations are made in the U 
pipe. 

22. Mechanically impure, or water con- 
taining oils, are purified as under 13, 14 and 
15- 

23. The treatments mentioned in section 
19 are also undertaken by the simple cold 
tests in the reagent glass or by the efflux 
test from a pipe 5 mm. wide and 30 mm. 
long. 

24. The test of the width of the U. pipe is 
desired upon equally broad experiments 
officially recommended, as, for example, by 
the Charlottenberg official Mechanic-Tech- 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



nic»l Society, or the official Bidista Chemic- 
Technical Society experiment. 

25. The establishment of the lowest limit 
for the ilish point is desired for railway oils, 
machine oils, cylinder oils, etc. , in order to 
characterize the lubricating oils, in a simple 
manner, as tree from easily evaporating oils 
and not dangerous. It should be further 
noted that the question is about one and the 
same oil, because the flash point, to a cer- 
tain extent, is connected with the inherent 
qualities of the oil. The height of this limit 
is determined for the various sorts of oils 
according to the special business require- 
ments. 

26. In every case in which one is con- 
cerned with obtaining the greatest possible 
accuracy the Pensky- Martin contrivance is 
to be employed; In other cases the open 
crucible. 

27. To the result is always added which 
contrivance has been employed. 



eluded from the direct sunlight one should 
observe whether a precipitate has formed. 
At the positive completion of the test as to 
quality the quantitative determination Is 
carried out with 5 gallons of oil under ex- 
actly the same conditions as in the qualita- 
tive test. 

33. In general undissolved asphalt sub- 
stances may be present in the oils. The 
presence of such substances can be detected 
by determining the asphalt contents in the 
filtered and unfiltered oil. 

;,4 The establishment of the limit num- 
ber for the asphalt content is accommodated 
to the purposes for which the oil is to be 
used. 

35. Fat oil is qualitatively proved by heat- 
ing for a quarter of an hour from 3 to 4 ccm. 
of the oil to be tested in a paraftiue bath to 
about 240 with a small piece of soda hy- 
drate. After cooling off to the temperature 
of the room the oils exhibit a gelatinization 



tative test allows considerable water con- 
tent to be observed. With oils which in- 
flame under 240 C. in Pensky, the deter- 
mination results so that the loss of weight, 
about the same great amount (10 to 15 gal- 
lons) of the original and the drained oils, is 
determined by heating in glass vessels in a 
boiling water bath until the disappearance 
of every froth formation. From the differ- 
ence of the loss of weight of the two tests Is 
to be reckoned the content of water in the 
original oil. Freeing the oil from water be- 
fore heating is effected by shaking the 
slightly heated oil in an Erlenmeyer alembic 
with chloride of calcium and thereafter 
filtering through a dry filter. 

39. Alkalies and salts are proved in the 
well known manner, namely by extracting 
the water as set forth in section 38. 

40. The lye test serves for testing naphtha 
acid, salt dissolved in oil. It is accomplished 
by agitating the same volumes of oil and 




One of tne First S. P. Engines to Burn Oil. 



18. The existing methods for the deter- 
mination of the free acids in lubricating oils 
are retained. Mineral acids are to be de- 
termined in a watery extract of about 100 
gallons of oil. Organic acids are to be de- 
termined with light oils in the alcoholic 
ethereal solution of 10 cc. m. oil, with dark 
oils in absolute alcoholic extract of a suit- 
able quantity of oil with watery or alcoholic 
lye. 

29. As a unit for the acid content the cus- 
tomary unit, "anhydrous sulphuric acid," 
should be retained in connection with min- 
eral oils. 

30. The determination of the solubility of 
light oils in banzlne or benzol is, in general, 
unnecssary. Only when turbidity of doubt- 
ful nature is exhibited is such a test neces- 
sary. 

31. Dark oils should be completely soluble 
In benzol. 

32. The determination of the solubility in 
pure petrolum benzine serves for the detec- 
tion of an asphalt content. The benzine 
should have a specific gravity of 0.69 0.71 at 
-|- 15 C. and the extreme boiling point of 
65 to 95. The solution for qualitative ex- 
amination should be made in a reagent glass 
of 15 mm. to 20 mm. in width in the propor- 
tion of one part oil to forty parts benzine. 
After standing for twenty-four hours ex- 



or soap suds or both these properties in the 
presence of fatty oils. The soap suds Is the 
final characteristic of the presence of fat oil 
in cylinder oils which have a salve like con- 
sistency themselves at room temperature. 

36. Quantitatively the fat oil is deter- 
mined according to the probable amount of 
fat present, and. according to the desired 
degree of accuracy of the determination, by 
the discovery of the saponification number 
or analytic weight according to Spitz and 
Honiz. 

37. For testing for resin oils a small por- 
tion of the oil (5 ccm.) is thoroughly shaken 
with sulphuric acid of 1.62 specific gravity. 

If, after separation of the layers, only a 
yellow or brown color appears in the acid 
layer and not the red color characteristic of 
resin oil then the oil is free of resin. With 
the appearance of red or doubtful dark 
coloring in the acid the oil is to be tested 
more closely f..r the contents of resin oil, 
according to the well known quantitative 
examination (Storch's extraction with 96 
per cent alcohol, polarization, etc.) The 
high specific gravity of the resin oil (0.970 
at 15° C.) and Its great, almost complete, 
solubility in absolute alcohol allows the oil 
to be easily recognized in mineral oils. 

38. The water content of the oil is to be 
determined only quantitatively if the quail- 



natron lye of 3 B. After agitating with the 
lye no emulsion should be exhibited at the 
separation of the layers of oil and lye by the 
oils free from salt. 

41. Generally the determination of the 
burning point is unnecessary for lubicating 
oils with the determination of the flash 
point. But it is recommended to also de- 
termine the burning point in especial cases, 
for example with remarkably low flash 
point, and in questions of danger from fires. 

42. The determination is effected in open 
porcelain crucibles 4 cm. wide and 4 cm. 
high upon a shallow hot sand bath saucer. 
The crucibles are to be half embedded In the 
sand. Heating should proceed steadily and 
amount to about 4° per minute, in extreme 
cases to 6° per minute. 

43. The distillation test is to be under- 
taken with the technical proof of the lubri- 
cating oil only when by unusually low flash 
point suspicion points to the presence of 
light oil and its characterization is necessary. 

44. The distillation test is employed in 
customs technical tests for the classification 
of the material to be proved. 

45. The distillation test shall, in general, 
be undertaken in Engler's glass bulb with 
100 ccm. of oil and cooled by a metal pipe 

Continued on Page Nine. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



I NEWS FROM TBE FIELD I 

11 « 

» Supplied by our Regular Correspondents jj 

Coalinga Letter. 

Coalinga, Dec. 9, 1903. 

El Capitan No. 3 is 475 feet deep, with 
n^-inch casing. 

The Keystone company's No. 1 well was 
resumed Monday night. 

K. C Oil company's No. 4 is 740 feet 
deep, and a string of 8-inch casing is being 
put in the hole. 

The Blue Diamond people are still fishing 
for the string of 5^-lnch casing. 

R. C. Baker, on the St. Paul lease is 450 
feet deep, with 95^-inch casing in well No. 2. 

The Stockholders No. 2 is 600 feet deep, 
and everything running smoothly. 

Westmoreland-Coallnga No. 1 Is about 500 
feet deep, with 10-lncb casing in the hole. 

The Wabash company's No. 2 derrick is 
being hauled to the lease, and work on it 
will commence in the near future. 

The Peerless Oil company's No. 1 well on 
section 22, 19-15 is 400 feet deep, and ny&- 
inch casing will be used for the first string. 

Mercantile Crude company's No. 3 was 
perforated Friday, and is showing up in fine 
style. The well is being baled, and will be 
producing in a short time. 

Herring brothers, who have taken the 
contract to drill the No. 3 well for the New 
San Francisco Crude company, will start to 
rig up this week. 

Fresno-San Francisco company's No. 3 is 
being drilled deeper. The work is being 
done by Herring brothers, on a contract. 

Pennsylvania Mining, Operating and De- 
veloping company's No. 1 is 550 feet deep, 
with 10-inch line pipe in the hole. 

Hanford Oil company's No. 5 is 1,210 feet 
deep, and through the first pay sand, with 
7^-inch casing. The tools are now work- 
ing in shale. 

Oil City Petroleum company's No. 8 is 
1,260 feet deep, with 9^6-inch casing, and 
still In the sand. This company is building 
the derrick for their No. 9 well. 

The drillers are working on the water 
well of the Elmore at section 6, which is 
about 250 feet deep, and up to this depth 
has shown no water. 

Canfield & Corey are still fighting the 
heaving sand, which seems to be present in 
great quantities in that section of the field. 

Twenty-eight company's No. 9 well is be- 
ing drilled deeper. No. 8, which was just 
deepened, is a fine producer, and makes 
about 450 barrels a day. 

The Esperanza company has a gang of 
men at work constructing a 3,000-barrel 
iron tank. Work on No. 4, which has been 
delayed by the non-arrival of an under- 
reamer, was resumed Tuesday. 

The El Zuma company's No. 4 is 360 feet 
deep. Work on this well has been a little 
slow this week, as the drillers have been 
wa ; ting for a shoe to arrive. By the time 
we go to press they expect to have in the 
first string of casing. 

The Roberts Oil company of Coalinga are 
running a swab to bring out the sand, which 
is forced up in the casing for some distance 
— from 200 to 500 feet. When this sand is 
once exhausted the well should be a good 
one. 

The Commercial Petroleum company's No. 



3 is 825 feet deep, with 8-inch drive pipe in 
the hole. No. 4 is 580 feet deep, with 10- 
inch drive pipe. The rig builders are at 
work building the derrick for this company's 
No. 5- well, which will be started as soon as 
No. 3 is completed. 

H. B. Guthrey, who has taken the con- 
tract to drill the Genesee No. 1, has a crew 
of men busy rigging up, and the work of 
drilling will be started at once. 

Independence Oil company of Coalinga's 
No. 8 well is being cleaned out. This well is 
giving the operators quite a little trouble, on 
account of the amount of sand it is throwing 
off; but when it once cleans itself, and gets 
started, it will be a fine producer. 

Thomas O'Donnell's well No. 1 on section 
7 Is 1,200 feet deep, with 10-inch pipe. No. 
2 is 1,216 feet deep, with 8-inch pipe. Both 
of these wells will be in the sand in a few 
days if everything runs right, and the sand 
Is found at a depth where it is expected. 

Caribou company's No. 3 is flowing and 
making about 400 barrels a day. Contractor 
Shreeves is preparing to deepen No. 2, after 
which he will drill No. 4. The derrick for 
No. 4 well will be built as soon as the rig 
builders get No. 2 in shape to deepen. 

Section Seven Oil company's drillers are 
working on No. 2, making an effort to get it 
producing. This well Is without doubt, a 
good one, but has developed such large 
quantities of sand that it is hard work to get 
the oil started. When it does start it will 
probably be as goo.l a producer as No. 1. 
No. 3 is 700 feet deep with io-inch line pipe. 

Maine State company's No. 6 is 920 feet 
deep, and the drillers are undemaming. 
The string of 10-inch drive pipe is being 
carried down. The company has erected a 
derrick to drill in a water well, and will do 
so at once. The derrick for No. 7 well is 
also in the process of construction, and drill- 
ing will be started there as soon as No. 6 Is 
completed. 

The Union OH company of California is 
1,025 feet deep, with 8-inch cising following 
the tools in well No. 2. It is in the pay 
sand, and will be drilled through. The hole 
will then be drilled deeper, to prospect for 
another s and. This is another of the ex- 
ceptionally good holes in this section of the 
field, being drilled in with two strings of 
casing — a 10-inch and 8-inch string. No. 3 
is 630 feet deep, with 10-inch pipe. 

Pleasant Valley Farming company's No. 1 
is finished and producing. The well is 
tubed with 3-inch tubing, and a packer has 
been put in. It Is now producing in fine 
style and will probably get better as it con- 
tinues to flow. R. C. Baker, the contractor, 
succeeded in drilling this well, and finishing 
it with two strings of casing — a 10-lnch and 
a 7^6-inch string. This is one of the very 
few wells in the .West Side field that has 
been drilled and completed with two strings 
of casing. No. 2 is 650 feet deep, with 10- 
inch casing in it. 

The Southern Pacific Railroad company 
has the material on the ground for a 10,000- 
banel receiving tank, to be built on their 
land on section 7. They will also build a 
500,000-barrel reservoir on this section. At 
present a gang of men is busy laying branch 
lines from the guage tanks of the Fresno- 
San Francisco, Penn-Coalinga and Section 
Seven companies. These lines will be con- 
nected with the receiving tank, and then 
with the main pipe line to Ora. The work 
is being carried on with all possible haste, 
and in a short time the Southern Pacific 
company will be buying oil and collecting 



their royalties in this field. 

Upon the information we have gathered 
in conversation with people who are in a 
position to know, we learn that the Standard 
has, or will soon, discontinue running the 
Bakersfield oil through the pipe line to 
Point Richmond. The Standard is not in 
business to lose money, and eventually they 
will find a way to get the Bakersfield oil to 
Point Richmond. This may necessitate the 
building of a refinery at Bakersfield. In the 
meantime, they must have oil to keep the 
refineries at Point Richmond going, and to 
get it they must look to Coalinga. There is 
another thing to take into consideration, and 
that is that the Southern Pacific Railroad 
company is rushing their pipe line, tank and 
reservoir work aud will be in a position very 
soon to handle oil. They will no doubt at 
that time take advantage of the clause found 
In their leases, which gives them the privil- 
ege to buy the production of the wells on 
those leases at the prevailing market price. 
These two things, namely, the necessity of 
the Standard to obtain oil from some source 
to keep their refineries going, and the 
probability of the Southern Pacific Railroad 
company exercising the option contained in 
their leases, will create a demand for oil. 
A demand for oil is what we want. Give us 
the demand and the price will take care of 
Itself. The probability of an increased de- 
mand and the natural consequences of such, 
make things look very favorable for this 
field. We have great faith in the future of 
the Coalinga oil field. — Coalinga OH News. 



Long Trip of OiI=Burning Steamer. 



The longest voyage ever attempted by a 
stearrer using oil as fuel is to be made by 
the American-Hawaiian freighter Nebraskan 
of this port. The steamer will make the run 
from San Francisco to New York without 
stop and will also make the return voyage 
without stopping at any South American 
port to replenish her fuel supply. The Ne- 
braskan is now at the Risdon Iron Works, 
where she Is being equipped with tanks that 
will hold a sufficient supply of oil to carry 
her to New York. The double bottom of the 
steamer and the ballast tanks will be filled 
with oil, and when completed the vessel will 
be able to carry 10,500 barrels of the fuel, 
sufficient to last her for sixty-five steaming 
days. 

The steamer will leave this port next 
month. Great interest is being evinced in 
her coming trip, as she will be the first oil 
burner to engage in the New York trade, 
and her success or failure means a great deal 
to the American Hawaiian Steamship com- 
pany. If the steamer makes a successful 
trip, it Is likely that other steamers of the 
line will be equipped with oil-burning 
plants. In the past the American-Hawaiian 
company has bean prevented from operating 
oil-burning steameas to New York because 
of its inability to secure oil-supply stations 
on the South American coast. If it is found 
that the enlargement of the Nebraskan's oil- 
tanks does not detract from her cargo-carry- 
ing capacity, the other steamers will be simi- 
larly fitted. 

The Nebraskan for the past year has been 
running between San Francisco and Hono- 
lulu in the sugar trade. Her owners state 
that the New York trade has been found 
more profitable and they have decided to 
send her around the Horn. The Nevadan 
will remain in the Hawaiian trade. 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Will Fight the S tandard OH. 

-;>atch«s from Berlin report that Rocke- 
feller's European chiefs are holding a con- 
ference in that city to dlscnss their plans for 
the coining fight for control of the German 
oil market, when the Standard Oil com- 
pany's millions will be pitted against the 
resources of the fatherland's two most power- 
ful banks. 

The Standard Oil company's control of 80 
per cent of the German trade h s long been 
a sore point with leading Germans. To 
crush this monopoly the Deutsche bank and 
Disconto Gesellschaft have recently ac- 
quired extensive wells and refineries in 
Roumania and Galicia. At the same time 
the Standard Oil company bought properties 
in Roumania in the face of government op- 
position, supposedly inspired from this capi- 
tal. Although the Americans are strongly 
intrenched In Germany, the banks have de- 
clared war to the knife and are prepared to 
spend millions to break their hold, which 
has lately been somewhat weakened by 
Dutch and Russian competition. 

Meantime the Standard Oil company is 
seeking an alliance with the Disconto Gesell- 
schaft, but without success. Rockefeller 
will find the German banks formidable ene- 
mies. Besides possessing unlimited capital, 
they have assured themselves of tremendous 
trade by means of the relations they occupy 
with the banking world throughout the 
country. Intimate connection with the gov- 
ernment also guaranteeing them advantages 
which the Americans will find hard to over- 
come. 



The Bourse here Is keenly Interested in 
the rise of price of Russian kerosene at Baku 
from ij'i kopecs a pood to 3.) since Septem- 
ber, attributing the same to purchases by 
the Standard Oil company. 

The Tageblatt's financial article says the 
Rothschild-Nobel group was formely obli- 
gated to deliver to the Standard OH com- 
pany a certain quantity of crude oil. The 
agreement ended in September, the Roths- 
child-Nobel group then being 36,000,000 
poods behind with Its deliveries. 

The Standard Oil company thereafter re- 
fused to renew the agreement and entered 
the Russian market In competition with 
the Russian exportets. Operators on the 
Bourse anticipate a serious conflict of gi- 
gantic financial interests, extending from 
Japan to Liverpool and possibly affecting 
other than oil interests. 



Eastern Oil Goes Up. 

A dispatch from Pittsburg, Pa., says: "The 
Standard and Producers' and Refiners' oil 
companies to-day advanced the quotation on 
Pennsylvania oil 3 cents, bringing the price 
up to $1.90, the highest since May, 1895. 
The Tacona, Corning and Newcastle also 
were advanced 3 cents, while the lower 
grades were up 1 cent. The gradual de- 
crease in production, necessitating the draw- 
ing upon stocks, is said to be responsible for 
the advance. 

"Operators have confidently expected the 
advance and predict $2 oil in the near future. 
Very little new territory is being discovered, 
but the drill is active, both in "wild catting" 
and in old districts." 



New Way of Oiling Roads. 

A new method of oiling roads Is being ex- 
perimented with at the Huntington Park 
tract in South Pasadena, which is said to 
make a pavement as hard as asphalt and one 
that will wear longer. The plan Is to mix 
the oil and earth and then tamp and press It. 
The first step in the process is to plow up the 
roadway and saturate It with water, which Is 
followed by a thorough soaking with oil. 
Then a 2800-pound roller Is run over the 
roadway. There are long pikes on the sur- 
face of the roller, which serves the double 
purpose of a packer and a mixer. Then the 
road is treated again with water, oil and 
roller. After this a two-ton roller is run 
ouer the road. By this time it is as solid as 
a rock. It is then surfaced and is ready for 
use. 



We manufacture the best 
lubricating oils for oil 
drillers 

KING KEYSTONE OIL CO., 
116 Front St., San Francisco. 

FOR SALB 

A complete oil well drilling 
outfit near Huntington, Ore- 
gon. Inventory and price 
on application to 
H. V. GATES, Hillsboro, Oregon. 



Monthly Exports of Oil from San Francico. 





MINERAL 


1 
, Crdde, 


Mineral, Refined, or Manufactured. 


Countries. 


INCLUDING NAT- 
URAL OILS, WITH- 
OUT REGARD TO 
GRAVITY. 


1 
Naphtha, including 
All Lighter Prod- 
ucts of Distillation. 


Illuminating. 


Lubricating 

and Heavy Paraffine 

Oils. 


Residuum, including 

Tar and all other 
from which the light 
bodies have been dis- 
tilled. 




Gallons 


Value 


Gallons 


Value 


Gallons 


Value 


Gallons 


Value 


Bbls. 


Value 


July, 1903. 












169 

82 

1,020 


$60 
22 

491 














650 
3,440 
2,130 


$126 
701 
410 


























630 


$125 












3o 

146 

438 

3,000 


II 

71 
191 
688 












1,100 


187 


1,100 


165 












































140 


29 












8,030 


964 
















2,634 

25.750 

100 


367 

5,145 

24 


622 
* 7,9'8 


375 
2,250 








3,318,000 


$110,600 


46,825 


5,682 












Total 


3,318,000 


$110,600 


56,585 


$6,958 


35,944 


$6,967 


13.425 


$4,159 






August, 1903. 










300 
Soo 

4,890 
3oo 
340 

7,200 


$70 
167 

1,032 
72 
66 

1.377 


2,165 


$929 








100 


$7 


440 


$107 








230 


63 






























20 

28,660 

1,360 

722 


5 

6,3'9 

272 

187 






























































90 


'9 












15,160 

14,400 
32.237 


1,822 
3.2" 
3.723 
















38,149 

293,770 

460 


6,830 

41,101 

116 


558 
16,777 


329 

5.441 








1,365,000 


45.500 














1,365,100 


$45,507 


62,237 


$8,863 


346.299 


$50,850 


50,492 


$13,545 






September, 1903. 












472 

80 

837 


$132 

3' 

282 
















t.050 
3.450 
1,100 


$■39 
723 
218 












































508 
190 
380 


56 

75 
165 
















1,960 
1,300 


308 
295 






































1,110 


$110 


1,260 


253 


IS8 


87 


















1,008,000 
1,806,000 


$36,000 
60,200 






45o 

125,500 

5o 


92 

15.703 

13 

$17,744 


305 
7,417 


189 
2,943 






31,920 


4.538 














2,814,000 


$96,200 


33.030 


$4,648 


136,120 


10,347 


$3.96o 







PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



The Oil Road and Its Inventor. 



The Omaha, Neb., Bee, in a recent issue, 
says that Maurice O. Eldridge, assistant di- 
rector in the office of public road inquiries 
of the United States Department of Agricul- 
ture, Washington, D. C, is in that city a 
guest of R. W. Richardson. He has just re- 
turned from the Pacific Coast, where he has 
been inspecting the road system. He at- 
tended the state good roads convention at 
Spokane, Washington. 

"Samuel W. Hill, son-in-law of J. J. Hill, 
the railway magnate, was appointed by the 
convention to go to Washington and work 
for the passage of the Brownlow bill," said 
Mr. Eldridge. 

"James W. Abbott, special agent for the 
Rocky Mountain and Pacific Coast Division 
of the office of Public Road Inquiries and 
myself made an extensive tour of the Pacific 
Coast from British Columbia to Old Mexico, 
taking in the Puget Sound country by rail 
and water. We inspected the straw-built 
roads of the Palouse region, Washington, as 
well as the oil roads of Southern California. 
Too much cannot be said of the success of 
the oil highways of Southern California, and 
I am free to admit that the Inventor of the 
system is as great a benefactor to the world 
as the inventor of the Macadam system of 
highways. These oil roads are as good, if 
not better, in many respects, than asphalt. 

The roadbeds are first built in the usual 
way, with a slight central crown to permit 
the water to run off of ordinary dirt. The 
road is then rolled and subsequently har- 
rowed to a depth of two inches. It is then 
sprinkled with water. After a few hours, 
and before the water has completely eva- 
porated, the roadbed is sprinkled with oil. 
Sand is then laid over this oil-sprinkled sur- 
face and a "mixer" run over it, which forces 
the sand and oil down into the roadbed, 
making a surface Impervious to water and of 
remarkable durability. The surface becomes 
hard and compact and will last for from three 
to four years without additional oil sprink- 
ling. Whatever dust blows from the ad- 
jacent lands becomes packed onto the oil 
percolated road and assists in giving it a 
finishing surface. These roads will sustain 
all the traffic in ordinary use In that country. 
The oil road plan has been adopted in many 
of the park systems of California cities and 
is a pronounced success. The oil road is 
certainly a success and I predict that it 
will become the popular boulevard roadbed 
throughout the country as soon as its merits 
become fully known." 

The inventor of the oil road, whom Mr. 
Eldridge well says "Is as great a benefactor 
to the world as the Inventor of the Macadam 
system of highways," is Mr. Frederick W. 
Mattern, an old and well-known resident of 
Los Angeles. 

About eighteen years ago Mr. Mattern en- 
tered upon a thorough investigation of the 
value of crude petroleum as a road making 
material. His experiments convinced him 
that with oil a dustless, mudless, enduring 
roadbed could be made, that a highway that 
would be ideal both for hauling and pleasure 
riding could be had, and at a reasonable cost, 
too. Realizing the great merit of his dis- 
covery he applied for letters patent covering 
it. The application for letters patent was 
granted, their number being 602,023. Soon 
after the issuance of the letters patent the 
rights therein acquired were assigned to the 
Dustless Roadbed company, Mr. Mattern re- 
ceiving as part of the consideration for this 



assignment the right to the privileges of the 
patent for the State of California, which right 
he subsequently assigned to the California 
Dustless Roads company, of which corpora- 
tion he is the president. 

The letters patent granted Mr. Mattern 
are exceedingly comprehensive and secure 
him or his assigns, broadly, in the right to 
make or treat roads, race courses and walks 
with crude petroleum, regardless of the 
manner, method or mechanism employed in 
the application of the oil. 

When Mr. Mattern first announced his 
discovery of the road-making properties of 
oil he was treated with ridicule, and when 
he persisted in trying to enlist interest and 
capital in his invention he was considered a 
mild type of crank. The idea of making 
good roads with oil, black, sticky, smelly oil, 
was so novel as to be excruciatingly ludi- 
crous to the wiseacres of the day — hence to 
all the other folks not wiseacres, but who 
simply "followed the leader." Like a lot of 
the "cranks" of history, Mr. Mattern found 
the establishing of his idea an uphill task, 
but, unlike most of his predecessors in 
"crankdom," he has lived to witness his vin- 
dication, to see the oil road so common and 
so popular, such a matter-of-course, that 
hardly; anybody thinks it could ever have 
been novel — so novel that the United States 
government issued patent rights to it. 



Oil and Gas in Iola Quadrangle, 
Kansas. 



Dr. George I. Adams, of the United States 
Geological Survey, spent part of last summer 
studying the oil and gas resources of the Ioli 
quadrangle, Kansas. With the assisltance of 
Professor Erasmus Haworth and Professor 
W. R. Crane, of Kansas University, Dr. 
Adams made a detailed survey of this quad- 
rangle, which had been surveyed topographi- 
cally during the summer of 1902. 

This quadrangle is a part of the Kansas- 
Indian Territory oil and gas field. The most 
important towns are Iola, Chanute, Hum- 
boldt and La Harpe, which lie in the more 
productive portion of the field. Bronson, 
Moran, Ellsmore, Savonburg and Erie are in 
the eastern border of the field, within the 
area surveyed, 

The present rapid development of the ter- 
ritory is the result of prospecting which has 
been conducted in the general field since 1865. 
Gas was first struck in a well at Iola in 1873, 
but no considerable quantity was found be- 
fore 1893. The discovery of oil in commer- 
cial quantities occurred about the same time 
at Neodesha. It was not until 1900 that 
drilling for oil in the Iola quadrangle began, 
as a result of the development of a small field 
at Chanute. 

The development of the gas resources was 
Stimulated by the fact that cheap gas would 
make possible the introduction of certain de- 
sirable industries. The large lead and zinc 
smelters at Iola, Gas City, La Harpe and 
Chanute, and the cement works at Iola, have 
all been established since the discovery of 
gas in the Iola quadrangle. 

The immediate market value of oil has been 
sufficient incentive for prospectors in search 
of that commodity. The growth of the field 
during the last two years has been so rapid 
that it has been difficult to keep pace with 
Its development. Even since September, 
when Dr. Adams left the field, the oil area 
has been considerably extended. Bulletin 
184 of the United States Geological Survey, 
on the Oil and Gas Fields of the Western In- 



terior and Northern Texas Coal Measures 
which Dr. Adams wrote in 1891, is valuable 
for its discussion of the general conditions of 
the field, but is no longer an adequate state- 
ment of present developments. 

The recent investigations made by Dr. 
Adams and his assistants were the first close 
studies ever attempted by the United States 
Geological Survey of that oil-gas field. The 
inquiry included a study of the volume of 
the flow and the pressure of the gas. Obser- 
vations were made which will help to esti- 
mate the life of the field. As the history of 
all gas fields shows that they ultimately be- 
come exhausted, determinations of this kind 
are of considerable economic importance. In 
certain places in this field the gas begins to 
show signs of diminution, but there is no 
immediate cause for alarm. 

The structure of the field and the mode of 
occurrence of the oil were subjects of in- 
quiry. The investigation shows that the oil 
in the district is contained in oil-bearing 
sands that are of limited extent but are'gene- 
gally distributed throughout the field. The 
oil is rather light and is adapted to distilla- 
tion. This fact increases its valve and ac- 
cordingly it is not used as a fuel oil. It is 
refined at Neodesha, to which point it is 
either shipped or pumped through pipe lines. 
Kerosene and gasoline are the principal pro- 
ducts. 

The even development of the Iola field has 
made it attractive to prospectors with mode- 
rate capital. Numerous oil companies are 
working systematically in the field. The 
production of individual wells is not phe- 
nomenal, as it was at Beaumont, Texas, but 
this fact augurs well for the life of the field. 
Many of the wells spout at first, but soon 
settle down to steady production. 

The topographic map of the Iola quad- 
rangle will be available in January. During 
the coming season it is proposed to study the 
geologic formation of the Independence quad 
rangle, which adjoins the Iola quadrangle, 
and which was surveyed topographically last 
summer. Dr. Adams' report on his recent 
investigations in the oil and gas fields of the 
Iola quadrangle will go the Public Printer 
about January 1. When it is ready for dis- 
tribution due notice will be given. 



Big Strike in Texas. 

A dispatch from Metagarda, Texas, says 
that intense excitement has followed in the 
wake of the new discovery of oil fields at 
Big Hill, 250 miles southwest of Beaumont, 
and prospectors by thousands are rushing to 
buy land, the prices of which has advanced 
from $to to $1,000 an acre since last Thurs- 
day. 

The Standard Oil company already has its 
agents on the ground and they are buying 
all of the property they can get their hands 
on. The oil experts now on the scene say 
the new fields promise to exceed those of 
Spindletop and Sour Lake in extent and the 
quantity of production in a shore time. Be- 
sides the Rockefeller agents, John W. Gates 
and his associates are on the ground and all 
are investing heavily. Former Governor 
Hogg owns 3,000 acres in close proplmity to 
the new field. 

The newly discovered wells are situated 
on the line of the Cane Belt railroad, which 
was recently acquired by the Santa Fe. A 
gnsher was struck several days ago, and the 
owners capped the well and endeavored to 
keep the find a secret until they could buy 
the adjoining land. The well broke loose 
Thursday and is gushing at the rate of 10,- 
000 barrels daily. The Santa Fe has just 
closed a deal for several hundred acres of 
land situated close to the well and will de- 
velop its holdings at once. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Gas Pip-- Lines. 



According to the Engineering and Mining 
Journal there are said to be approximately 
25,000 miles of pipe line laid for the con- 
veyance of natural gas in the United States. 
These are of various sizes, ranging from 1 
inches in diameter to 36 Inches. For the 
transportation of large quantities of gas, or 
even comparatively small quantities when 
the line is a long one and pumping is not 
resorted to, the pipes have to be of con- 
siderable diameter. Thus the transporta- 
tion of 4,000,000 cubic feet of gas per 24 
hours (156,667 feet per hour) a distance of 
twenty miles with in-take pressure of 200 
pounds and discharge of twenty pounds, re- 
quires a 6-inch pipe. Reckoning 25,000 cu- 
bic feet of gas as equivalent to 2,000 pounds 
of coal, 4,000,000 cubic feet of gas per 
twenty-four hours corresponds to only 160 
tons of coal. The construction of a 6-inch 
line will probably ccst about $4,750 per 
mile, or $95,000 for twenty miles. Allowing 
only 10 per cent for interest and deprecia- 
tion, the daily charge is $9,500 or for 365 
days in a year at $26 per day, which would 
be equivalent to paying for the carriage of 
coal at o 8 cent per ton mile. When the in- 
take pressure— i. e,. the pressure at the gas 
wells — falls below .200 pounds, either a 
pumping plant must be put in or a larger 
line must be put down. Remoteness from 
sources of gas, therefore, increases the cost 
of the latter very rapidly. The construction 
of a pipe line of large diameter is an ex- 
pensive undertaking, the larger sizes ex- 
ceeding in cost that of a first-class railway 
line. Pipe lines for the transportation of 
natural gas are commonly constructed of 
wrought iron pipe, technically known as 
"line pipe," which is tested up to 1,500 
pounds. Line pipe is made with longer 
couplings than ordinary pipe. The Stand- 
ard sizes range from 2 inches to 12 inches 
in diameter. The smaller pipe lines, say 10 
Inches in diameter or less, are usually laid 
with the Standard screw joint line pipe, but 
lately plain end pipe with couplings and 
rubber packing has become very popular 
and is to a large extent taking the place of 
screw joint pipe, it being equally cheap in 
first cost and more readily laid. The pipe 
line should be burled under ground so that 
the distance from the surface of the ground 
to the top of the pipe will be 18 to 20 
inches. This puts the line out of the way 
and makes it comparatively free from the 
expansive and contt active force to which it 
would be subject if it were exposed on the 
surface of the ground to the direct heat of 
the sun. 

The ditching is not very expensive; in 
ordinary soil it ought not to cost much more 
than 6 cents per lineal foot. The pipes 
should be well protected with coal lar on the 
ontside before laying. Expansion joints 



should be put In from time to time, say at 
one-half mile Intervals, and also a certain 
number of gate valves and tees to permit 
connections to be made at points where they 
may be required. A well laid pipe line 
suffers comparatively little depreciation in 
value, and the pipe, after having been in the 
gronnd for four or five years, may be taken 
up and sold at a discount of only 15 to 25 
per cent from the first cost, according to the 
demand at the time. Second-hand pipe in 
large quantities is always more or less In 
request. 

Sizes of pipe from 10 inches to 2 feet in 
diameter are frequently laid with the Con- 
verse joint, in connection with which the 
pipe has plain ends, the connections being 
made by heavy cast iron sleeves, or hubs, 
filled with molten lead, which is calked Into 
the space between the pipe and the sleeve. 
This joint has the disadvantage that the 
packing may be loosened by the settling of 
the pipe and the movement due to changes 
in temperature. However, by the addition 
of a rubber packing pressed against the out- 
side of the joint by means of Iron clamps, a 
satisfactory connection can be made. Pipe 
lines of this construction bave operated un- 
der a pressure of more than 300 pounds 
per square inch. For pipe lines of more 
than 2-foot diameter, cast iron water pipe or 
riveted steel pipe 36-inch diameter, extend- 
ing twenty miles southward from Pittsburg, 
Pa., cost approximately $50,000 per mile. 
At present, Pittsburg is receiving gas from 
points in West Virginia more than 100 miles 
distant, while the lines which supply Chi- 
cago, Toledo, and Cleveland are considerably 
longer, the gas in some cases b. ing conducted 
200 miles. 



OH Field Directory. 

Dallas & Shaffrath, In conjunction with 
Barlow & Hill of Bakersfield, will soon place 
on sale an oil field directory, and are now 
busy collecting data for its composition. 
The book, when completed, will contain five 
maps of the different fields in the state, and 
also a map of the southern portion of the 
state, showing the relative positions of the 
different fields. 

The book will contain an index of the 



fields, companies and land owners and will 
also give the office address of each company. 
Such a book will be of great value to oil 
men and should meet with a ready sale. 



Purchase Salt Lake Oil Lands. 



Eastern oil operators this week purchased 
10,000 acres of land on the shores of Great 
Salt Lake and will open up big oil fields 
there. The purchasers of the land are : S. 
Tenny French, capitalist of Chicago, vice- 
president of the Welch Oil company of Ohio; 
W. C. Bigger, attorney, of Ohio, and A. J. 
Wallace, of Buller, Pa., one of the best-known 
oil operators in the country. 

The land adjoins that recently leased by 
the Pittsburg oil magnates, Guffey & Galley. 
The price paid was $50,000 cash. Colonel 
Butler says that Gteat Salt Lake shores will 
develop the greatest oil fields in the world. 

Continued from Page Five. 

The heating of the oil must not exceed 320 
C. 

46. For customs techical tests a contri- 
vance has been officially described. 

47. The determination of the amount of 
evaporation by heating the oil in an open 
vessel (porcelain crucible) is only necessary 
by way of exception, namely in order to 
compare, in especial cases, the evaporation 
of such oils as are employed by hot steam ma- 
chines and by machines of high pressure, 
for highly heated oil baths and the like. 

48. The determination should be made in 
porcelain crucibles 4 cm. wide and 4 cm. 
high. The crucible, half submerged in the 
sand bath, should be heated to the degree of 
temperature in question. For the exa- 
mination oil is always brought for compari- 
son and the heating is effected in the ex- 
periment for comparison with equal speed 
(20 to 30 minutes). There are always two 
experiments to be made from the results of 
which the average is to be accepted. 

49. The determination of the paraffine 
contents can generally be dispensed with in 
testing lubricating oils. In especial cases, 
for example in testing the origin of oils, in 
cases of disputes, etc., the alcohol-ether 
treatment of Hold can be utilized for de- 
termining paraffine. — Naphtha. 




BATES' 

PATENT CASING TONGS 



Fills a long-felt want. No more need of 
pole and rope f jr screwing up casing. Bates 
Tongs can be applied to the casing anywhere 
in driving or pulling without danger of injury 
or parting casing. 

Set No. 1, with any two size jaws from 95s 
to 13^ inches. 

Set No. 2, with any two size jaws from 4 to 
<jY& inches. 




ALL 

UP 

OIL WELL TO 

SUPPLIES DATE 

R. H. HERRON CO. 




FISHING TOOLS 
FOR RENT 

509 MISSION STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



PACIFIC Oil, REPORTER 



Sigs^swgsigaaB igas a s gsgaiftBgrgasftgscsftH) 



I 



NEWS FROM THE COAST 



n Recent Developments in California Fields, u 

Devil's Den. 

The outlook for this district continues to improve. 
Smith & Bryner are going to commence work on 
their second well, which will be about three-quarters 
of a mile to the north and east of their first one. It 
is their intention to drill several wells in this vicinity. 

It is reported that the Gould Central Oil company 
is to resume work on its holdings in 16-18. 

The Western Oil and Refining company, of which 
Spreckles is the leading spirit, is now making pre- 
parations to sink several wells. This company has 
been idle for some time, but now that several dis- 
coveries on a very high grade of oil have been made 
in close proximity to their lands, the word comes 
that they are going ahead on a large scale. 

The Niagara Oil company, which is controlled by 
Hanford and Visalia people, has leased a portion of 
their land to Smith & Bryner of Coalinga. 

Canfield & Chanselor have become interested in 
the Devil's Den. It is hoped that the energetic 
spirit that has characterized their operations in the 
other fields of California will not be found lagging 
in this district. 

Representative of the Standard Oil company were 
in this fi»ld a few days ago looking over the property 
of various companies, but the object of their visit 
could not be learned. Like the traditional oyster, 
the; are not an information bureau. 

A party of surveyors are camped near the mouth 
of the Antelope. Apparent'y they are making a 
railroad or pipe line survey, but the true nature of 
their work could not be learned. 

Halt Moon Bay. 

The Fountain Oil company made a good strike 
last Wednesday. The oil is now flowing over the 
casing, and there is great joy in camp. One or two 
more strikes of this kind and Half Moon Bay oil 
stocks will begin to flow upward, too. 

The eastern trip of Mr. J. E. Kerr in the interests 
of the Wisconsin Gold Bond Oil company has been 
successful and upon the return of Mr. Kerr to Cali- 
fornia, work will be resumed and the well pushed to 
completio-. 

The Duchess Oil company will shortly be actively 
at work in this field as arrangements have been 
made in t We east for the most advantageous com- 
pletion of this company's development. 

Kern. 

The Altoona-Midway has erected a 600-barrel tank 
on its property at Midway. The work is in charge 
of John Conley. A reservoir is also being con- 
structed, and when these are completed the wells 
will be put on thjpamp and given a thorough test. 
In common with the other companies at Midway, 
the Altoona is preparing for the great revivl of busi- 
ness which will follow the completion of the pipe- 
line that is to give them transportation facilities. 
The Altoona is right on the line of this. 

The Sunset Coast is about to erect a new derrick in 
place of the one which was blown down a short time 
ago. 

A new derrick has been erected on the southeast 
quarter of 2J-32-23, the property controlled by the 
Utah Crude. 

The California Fortune has completed its well No. 
3 and has a rig up for No. 4. This company has also 
a 75,000-barrel reservoir of oil. 

On 32-32-24 the old I Stratton well which has been 
flowing for the past two years, is now to be drilled to 
a greater depth. The work has been much delayed 
on account of fishing for lost tools, 

The grading for the extension of the railroad at 
Sunset is about completed and the laying of rails 
will commence very shortly. 

C. H. Ritchie and W. 8. Morton have made the 
contract to drill several wells on the property of the 
Transport at Sunset. This company has one well 
already completed and it has been flowing for about 
ten days. Development work is being pushed vigor- 
ously on the property. 

There is much activity in assessment work in the 
West Side fields tt present, as the time for doing 
this for 1903 under the law expires with the last of 
the month. There are thousands of acres at Sunset, 



Midway and McKittrick, the title to which is still 
in the hands of the government and the locators are 
required to perform this labor in order to hold pos- 
session of the property. 

The building of the railroad and pipe line at Sun- 
set has resulted in slight advances in the price of 
the stocks of the several companies in that district 
now selling on exchange. The Occidental, which 
was formerly offered at 18 cents, is now held at so 
cents, though a few transfers recorded at 15 cents. 
The Superior stock now is held at 7 cents. Con- 
siderable activity is also reported in Monarch, which 
is held at over 50 cents. 

W. P. Mcintosh, who cperated so successfully in 
the Sunset oil district and completed two fine wells 
for the Colorado-California Oil company, returned 
yesterday from Coffeyville, Kansas, and will visit 
the property at Sunset this week. As soon as 
transportation facilities are completed development 
will be resumed on the property, but until that time 
he will devote his time to the development of his oil 
property in the Sunflower state. Mr. Mcintosh says 
there is still lively interest in the east in the Cali- 
fornia oil fields and many investors are investigating 
the merits of the local districts. 

John M. Wright, president of the Peerless and 
Fulton companies, accompanied by Superintendent 
M. L. Thorn, left this morning overland for Sunset, 
where he will inspect the property of the Fulton. 
From there he will go to the Midway district, where 
he has acquired another property on section 15, 
which formerly belonged to C. A. Canfield and his 
associates. A well was drilled to a depth of 1,050 
feet by Mr. Canfield on the property and then aban- 
doned. Mr. Wright intends to sink it to a greater 
depth in the hope of finding oil. This land adjoins 
the properties of the Bay City, the California Con- 
solidated Crude and the Chanslor-Canfield com- 
panies. The entracceof Mr. Wright into (he Mid- 
way field is another proof of the confidence felt in the 
future of that district, now that it is to be opened up 
by the great pipe line in course of construction by 
the Consolidated California O 1 Fields company. 

The construction of the pipe line of the Consoli- 
dated California O'lfields company through the Sun- 
set and Midway fields is being somewhat delayed by 
the failure to get the necessary fixings for joining 
the pipe. The line is to be built to s'and a hydraulic 
pressure of 1,000 pounds per square inch and it was 
found that special fixings would have to be manu- 
factured. These are not expected to be on hand for 
about six weeks. It is thought that the line will not 
be ready for use until about February 1st and oper- 
ators, especially in the Midway are watching the 
progress of the pipe line with great interest. 

The Reward Oil company, located on 12, 30-31, 
near the Giant and ICern River companies, has just 
finished a good flowing well on its property. The 
work was done by H. Guthrey, formerly of the Mc- 
Kittrick. Mr. Guthrey is also drilling the well on 
the old Empire lease, which, it was reported a few 
days ago, struck oil. The latter has found the best 
indications of oil but has not completed its well, as 
was reported, and the final result is still in doubt. 

The case of the Argentine O 1 company versus 
Jesse Dover et al., involving the ownership of oil 
lands in the west side fields, claimed by a number 
of promiuent residents of this county, will probably 
come up in the United States Circuit Court in Janu- 
ary of May, according to whether it is tried at 
Fresno or at Los Angeles If it is to be heard at the 
former place it may have to wait until May, other 
wise it may come up sooner. 

The Santa Fe has put on its Overland Limited 
daily for the winter. The train has been passing 
through this city every day this week. Going east 
the train leaves San Francisco in the evening and 
arrives at Bakersfield at 8 A. M. Westbound it goes 
through Bakersfield at 6 o'clock p. m., arriving in 
San Francisco the following morning. 

The Southwestern refinery is approaching com- 
pletion at the Kern River field. The coopers' sup- 
plies are still delayed in arriving and this is causing 
much trouble to the management. The smokestack 
was put in place yesterday. It is fifty feet high and 
thirty-six inches in diameter. 

The Alma, one of the independent companies of 
the Kern River field, paid a dividend of 3 cents on 
the 1st of December. The last dividend paid before 
this was on June 1st and amounted to the same, 
making an annnal return of 6 per cent on the in- 
vestment. The company's property is on section 4. 

Despite the reports of activity in the Los Angeles 
field, oil men in the city who have visited that dis- 
trict lately say that the operators are not increasing 
their output to any great extent in spite of their 



efforts to get an increased production. As the de- 
mand for oil is increasing so rapidly, this means 
much for Kern county, where the output is increas- 
ing all the time and is limited chiefly by the ability 
of the operators to get machinery and help to drill 
more wells. The Los Angeles oil is a light oil, and 
for this the demand is greater than ever. The light 
oils of Kern county are found on the west side and 
the fact that the supply from other fields is not 
keeping pace with the demand means much for 
these districts, which are just beginning to come to 
the front. 

The Standard is still taking oil in large quantities 
from many of the different companies at Kern 
River and seine of them have been given to under- 
stand that the great corporation can take care of all 
the. oil they may have to offer. From this, it may 
be safely said, that there is little or nothing in the 
reports that the pipe line is to shut down, except 
temporarily for a brief period. 

The Grand Oil company, of Reno, Nevada, is 
sinking a test well six miles east of Sunset, in the 
San Diano district. The well has already rescued a 
depth of 200 feet and drilling has been temporarily 
suspended, awaiting the arrival of a cable which has 
been ordered some time. The contract for this well 
was let for a depth of 2,000 feet, provided oil in pay- 
ing quantities is not found before this depth is 
reached. The rock stratas seemed to have a heavy 
eastwardly dip from the Sunset district, and it is be- 
lieved by sjme that this well will have to be drilled 
considerably deep:r to penetrate the same oil bear- 
ing sand that is found in the Sunset field. Several 
experien _ ed men have expressed the opi:ion that 
they see no reasou w'ly a good well should not be 
struck on this location. 

Lompoc. 

The Union Oil company's new well, the Purisima, 
proves that the Lompoc field is one of the biggest 
and best in the state of California. The Purisima 
well is d'rectly north of the town of "Lompoc, at a 
distance of about six mile?. Oil was struck in the 
forepart of the week. The well is situated on the 
Purisima R'ncho, formerly the property of John H. 
Wise, but now belonging to the Dnion Oil company. 
It is on the south slope of the Lompoc anticline and 
is two and one-half miles west of the 390-barrel well 
of the Union Oil company, known as Hill No. I. 
The new well is judged by some of the best oil ex- 
perts to be even better than Hill No. 1 The oil is 
of about 21 gravity. The territory now proven is 
believed to be only a small portion of this oil dis- 
trict, as the same formation exists for twenty miles 
or more, from the Burton and Dutard r.nchos, in a 
southeasterly direction as far as Santa Rita and 
Buell's Rancho. On this vast territory the Union 
Oil company owns about 75,000 acres. The Lompoc 
Dividend Oil company owns 1,000 or 1,100 acres, and 
the Los Alamos Oil Developing company owns a 
considerable tract also. The Pacific Transportation 
company has some good holdings. All of these com- 
panies are putting down test wells. The finished 
wells are deep, about an average of 2,500 feet. Many 
oil men, especially operators in the local field say 
there will be one of the biggest oil booms here ever 
known. 

Word was received here yesterday that the tools 
that were dropped in the Lompoc Oil company's 
well a few weeks ago had been recovered. The well 
is 2,600 feet d?ep and the task of grappling for the 
big drill at the bottom of a hole half a mile below 
the surface was a difficult one, and at one time it was 
thought the job would have to be abandoned. Since 
work was suspended on this well on account of the 
lost tools, oil has been found in wells near by, and it 
is thought they have to go but a short distance 
further to strike it in this one. 

Santa Barbara. 

The Pinal company Is now clearing the ground for 
well No. 6. Drilling on No. 5 will begin shortly, the 
derrick being completed. This will be sunk about 
600 feet east of No. 1. All the wells are producing 
excellent, No. 4 being the banner well. ,In speaking 
with Mr. Tietzen in regard to this well, we are in- 
formed that on Tuesday evening it began spouting 
and for three hours poured out a solid stream of oil. 

The Brookshire company is making steady pro- 
gress, well No. 2 being down to the depth of 1,400 
feet. Gas and seepages are in evidence and the in- 
dications for a good well are most flattering. 

Mr. Elliottt, who is now in Los Angeles waiting 
for casing to continue sinking the well begun on the 
WiKiam Rice place, is expected home shortly. The 
hole started v i'h his rotary was sunk to a depth of 
oo feat and showed every indication of oil. Light 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



seepage* sod gas were encountered »t • depth less 
than $00 feet. 

The Los Alamos Development company operating 
on the De la Guerra ranch had to remain id'e a few 
days this week, awaiting the arrival of a new cable. 
The company is down 1,700 feet. 

Drilling continues on well No. 2 of the Union com- 
pany and good headway is reported. It is only a 
question of time before the oil sands will be reached 
and another good well brought in. 

Drilling on well No 18 of the Western Union com- 
pany has begun and the drillers are down about 
100 feet. The work of getting the old wells in good 
order is progressing favorable under the direction of 
William Logan. 

Work on the new tank for the Standard Oil com- 
pany at Poit Harford is progressing very satisfac- 
tory and in about ten days will be ready for the 
Pinal company's product. Some idea of the magni- 
tude of this tank can be had when it is known that 
it is possible to put the Hart House in the tank and 



and a few other wealthy Californians and that a der- 
rick will be erected on the property in the early 
spring. This sal* is just a forerunrer of what is to 
transpire this winter In the matter of land transfers. 
Prom an authoritative source we learn that a gigantic 
deal is pending in the Aspen district. 

The petction forwarded to the Interior depart- 
man', at Washirgton by the representative nil men of 
this field was promptly honored by the givernment 
officials on Tuesday As has been before stated, the 
petition called upon the government to extend the 
time of discovery on a'l unpatented Union Pacific 
lands in the Uinta county oil fields. Word was re- 
ceived by the land officers at this point on Tuesday 
that the request of the petitioners had been respected 
and that lorators on the lands in question would be 
given an indefinite period in which In complete their 
discoveries. This ruling is received with no little 
sense of gratitude by those affected. 

With the introduction of that most necessary ele- 
ment — ca;ital— there now remains little doubt but 



fields, and is considering extensive purchases 
'^cations have been prepared for two refin'ries,. 
one of which will be built at Lander and the other 
probably at 01 near Orin Junction. Senator C. D. 
Clark and Representative P. W. Mondell, both ex- 
tensive owners cf oil land, have turned over to the 
company their most valuable holdings, with the un- 
derstanding that they receive au adequate compen- 
sation in case the drilling and development work 
turns out successful. The ccmrany already con- 
trols large holdings in the Salt Creek, Lauder and 
Suit Wells distri.t. One tract of its land extends 
from Casper across the Dutton Basin and Rattlesnake 
Mountains to Lander. Five we'ls are being drilled 
at Salt Wells, and from thirty to forty men are em- 
ployed constantly. 

Attention of capital has been attracted to the oil 
prospects of Salt Lake valley and an oil field is to be 
developed near Parmingtou, Utah, where several ex- 
perimental wells are to be drilled at once. Can it be 
possible that our sister state is going to join us in 
illuminating the world i 




The Old and the New — Scene in the Wyoming Oil Field. 



then have room to spare. 

Summerland. 

The heaviest surf known in twenty years has been 
playing havoc with the numerous oil wharves at 
Summerland. Of the fifteen or twenty structures 
not one remains intact. Some of the wharves were 
not in me, but most of them supported machinery 
used in pumping oil. The beach is piled high with 
the wreckage, and most of the wells are ruined. In 
some instances the casings were left standing and 
the wharves can be rebuilt oat of them. The loss is 
estimated at f 20,000. 

Wyoming. 

We believe that it falls to the lot of Colonel F. M. 
Fete, to turn one of the most profitable deals yet 
consnmmated in the promising Wyoming oil fields. 
A representative of California capitalists was in this 
city last Saturday and closed a deal with the colonel 
for section 12-15-uo, being in the Pleasant Valley 
district— an entirely new field of optrations. We 
understand the land was taken in by Claus Spreckles 



that the oil fields of Uinta county will prove a for- 
tune-maker for all who are fortunate enough to come 
in on the ground floor. The wonderful stretch of 
promising oil territory has hardly been invaded yet 
and it is a fact that thousands upon thousands of 
acres yet await the magic touch of capital You who 
have money to invest, come to Uinta county and use 
wise judgment. 

J. H. Lobell, director and American representative 
of the Belgo- American Drilling combine, says that 
the company will begin the construction of a railroad 
line to Lander before the opening of the year. One 
of the spurs will open the Salt Creek oil field, sixty 
miles from Casper, and another will probably be laid 
to Thermopolis. Contracts for construction work 
have been let, and Mr. Lobell goes to Europe next 
month to make final arrangements with the directors. 
He will not return to America until February, but in 
the meantime the work will be pushed. The Belgo- 
American combine holds options on large a eas of oil 
land in the Powder River, Newcastle and Salt Creek 



Assessment work is in progress on a large scale in 
our nil field at the present time. 

C. O. Richardson was in town from Spring Valley 
Thursday on business. He said drilling was in pro- 
gress at the well of the Standard-Reserve Oil com- 
pany, and would be continued all winter. This com- 
pany is now down over 900 feet, have had a good 
showing of oil on several occasions, and have flat- 
tering indications of striking it rich. The Standard- 
Reserve will erect two more derricks on 12, 15-118 in 
the near future. 

The Bettys Oil and Development company are 
now down over 1,000 feet at their well south of the 
city. For several days the drill has been grinding 
in a hard formation and progress is slow at present. 
This is said t) be an indication that the oil sand is 
not far off and the drillers feel greatly encouraged. 
This company is prepared to drill all wint r. Mr. 
Bettys will shortly erect a derrick on section 14, 14,- 
123, the material for which is now being placed on 
the ground. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



Private Rooms 



Phone Main 5966 



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Jules' Restaurant 



Regular Dinner with wine, 75c. 
Sundays and Holidays, $i.oo. 



315 317-319=321-323 

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Open Evenings 
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to. to 




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^oiLimES^ 


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"~ 







FOR SALE 

IN 

KERN RIVER, Cheap 

Section 2, 29-28. 

Shaded portion map shows 40 acres three-fourths mile east of 
DISCOVERY WELL. U. S. Patent 22 years. EASY TERMS. 
Cheapest in Kern River. Write at once. 

WESTERN R. 1. CO., 

Room 36 Chronicle BIdg., 

San Francisco. 





MAY BE HAD AS FOLLOWS: 

From Nov. I, 1899, to Nov. 1, 1900 $6.00 

From Nov. 1, 1900, to Nov. 1, 1901 6.00 

1 From Nov. x, 1901, to Nov. 1, 1902 5.00 


Bound Volumes 

of the 

Pacific 

Oil 

Reporter 


These volumes are strengly and 
artistically bound, and contain 
the only full and correct informa- 
tion as to the development of the 
[ oil industry on the Pacific coast. 


Editorial and Publishing Office 

318 Pine Street 
San Francisco, - Cal. 





Notice to Creditors. 



Estate of William B. Winn, deceased. 

Notice is hereby given by the under- 
signed, executrix of the estate of William 
B. Winn, deceased, to the creditors of, 
and all persons having claims against, 
the said deceased, to exhibit them, with 
the necessary vouchers, within four 
months after the first publication of this 
notice to the said executrix at the office 
of William H. Waste, attorney-at-law, 
906 Broadway, Oakland, Cal., which said 
office the undersigned selects as her 
place of business in all matters connected 
with the said estate of William B. Winn, 
deceased. 

MARIA ROSA WINN, 
Executrix of the last will and testament 
of Wiliam B. Winn, deceased. 

Dated Oakland, September 28, 1903. 

WmiiM H. WASTE, attornery for 
estate, Oakland, Cal. 



Stock, Bond and Investment Syndicate 

(Incorporated) 
Money loaned on Stocks. 

Listed and Unlisted Oil and Mining Stocks 
R. L. CHBNRY, Secretary 
514-515 Examiner Building 

San Francisco, California 



J. S. EWEN 

STOCKBROKER 

318 PINE STREET, Room 5 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Member California Stock and Oil Ex- 
change, and San Francisco and Tonopah 
Mining Fxchange. 

Telephone Main 1552. 



Wyoming Oil Companies 

We can furnish you nice folders 
with the map of Uinta county oi 
fields on one side, and on the 
other whatever advertising matter 
you may desire. 

We have half-tone cuts of the 
field which can be used in the 
folder free of charge. On the 
map your property will be shown 
in colors. 

Price per thousand $40. When 
a large number are desired a sub- 
stantial reduction per thousand 
is made. 

Orders filled promptly, 
Pacific Oil Reporter, 
318 Pine street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



W. A. BROPHY, 

914 Mutual Savings Bank BIdg., 

708 Market St., San Francisco. 
Telephone, Green 816. 



Petroleum Lands Examined and Re 
ported on in all Parts of the United 
States. California a Specialty. 



Companies Incorporated 

under the lienient laws of 
ARIZONA 

which has the broadest laws of any state. 
Companies can be organized to do busiuess any 
where No personal liability. No limit on capi 
talization. No State examination of books. No 
franchise tax. Stock can be made non-assessable 
and can be issued for services. 

Write for information and blanks to • 
HUGH M. CREIGHTON & CO. 
Phoenix, Arizona. 



THE 



Pacific Oil Reporter 



is the only 
OIL JOURNAL 
Published on the 
Pacific Coast. 

It gives full, fresh and authentic oil news from 
all the oil districts, new and old. It exposes 
fraudulent oil companies. It gives the latest 
information on oil stocks and dividends. It 
describes the latest method of drilling wells, 
pumping, piping and storing oil; use of oil for 
road making, etc. 

It is the only paper which advocates the belief 
that California's refined asphalt is the equal 
of Trinidad asphalt for paving and other pur- 
poses, and is In every way superior to bitumi- 
nous rock, the use of which has given San 
Francisco, Oakland and other California cities 
so many poor streets. 

The subscription price is $2.50 a year. If you 
are interested in any way in California oil, cut 
out the following coupon, fill in the blank lines, 
and send it, accompanied by check, money 
order or express order to the 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine St. San Francisco 



for- 



Subscription Blank 



f 1 Year f 2.90 

-j 6 Months 1.50 
(3 Months 1.00 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine Street. San Francisco. 

Please enter my subscription to the Pacific Oil, Reporter 

at I 



Signed- 



Address 



Date 



PACIFIC OIL RKlORTKR 13 



I ANNOUNCEMENT 1 

* >t> 

ii/ to 

\t> '♦> 

U/ On January first, 1904, the PACIFIC OIL REPORTER !£ 

it/ w 

jjj will issue a Special New Year's Edition, covering the !J! 

tt progress made in all of the California oil fields during m 

**/. 2 

to the year 1903, and the outlook for the coining year, Jjj 

jjj together with reliable figures on the output, etc. $ 

viz This edition will be superbly illustrated and will 9 

it, ff 

& contain articles by those most prominent in the oil JJJ 

jjj industry. From 25,000 to 30,000 copies will be circu= (t> 

viz 9 

\tt lated. Secure your advertising space at once, as it is W 

yj> already being rapidly taken. JJJ 

3! * 

S m 

SL # 



14 

California Stock and Oil 
Exchange. 

The following were the stock sales in 
the California Stock and Oil Exchange 
in the formal sessions held for the week 
ending Wednesday, December 9th. 

AZTEC. 

275 at 75 I 206 25 

CHICAGO CRUDE. 

500 at 18 9000 

SOJat 19 95 00 

CLAIRMONT. 

500 at 30 15000 

FOUR. 
700 at 69 48J 00 

HOME OIL. 

600 at 95 57° 00 

400 at 100 40000 

MONARCH. 
300 at 46 13800 

MONTE CRISTO. 

500 at 66 33° o° 

300 at 70 21000 

OCCIDENTAL OIL. 

1,500 at 19 28500 

OIL CITY PETROLEUM. 

8,000 at 27 4 2,16000 

5,000 at 26 1,56000 

3,000 at 25 (S 90) 750 00 

2,030 at 25 50000 

SOVEREIGN. 

400 at 39 15600 

STERLING. 

200 at 2 60 5 20 00 

SUPERIOR. 

1,000 at 06 6000 

TOLTEC 

1,850 at 20 27000 

TWENTY-EIGHT. 
100 at 420 42000 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



28,423 Shares 



Amount, I9.151.25 



The monthly record of sales since 
January 1, 1903, is as follows: 

Shares. Value. 

January 267,019 1255,202 

February 322,443 219,358 

March 199,908 151,982 

April 236,268 115,571 

May 401,454 154,386 

June 154,720 ir7,928 

July 74.594 71,890 

August 181,478 119,231 

September 146, 123 74,455 

Stock Quotations. 

Following are the latest quotations for 
stocks of oil companies listed on the Cal- 
ifornia Stock and Oil Exchange: 



Oil Stocks, 



Bid. Asked. 



Alma 1.32% 

Apollo 40 

Asso. Oil Co Stk. Tr. 

Certificates .20 

Aztec 65 .75 

Bay City .. .10 

Bear Flag 

California Standard .11 

Caribou 1 02 J£ 

Central Point Con 60 

Chicago Crude 18 19 

Clalremont .30 

Esperanza 1.30 

Fauna , 02 

Four 63 .70 

Fulton 4 s^ 

Giant 

Hanford 137.00 145 00 

Home 1. 00 1.05 

Homestake ,. 

Imperial , . 

Independence .14 

Junction 19 

Kern 5 00 

Kern River 10.00 

Lion , 

Monarch of Arizona .. . ,45 

Maricopa 10 

McKittrick 20 

Monte Cristo Co 

Nevada .30 .,. 

Occidental of West Va 18 19 

Oil City Petroleum 27 

Peerless 1350 

Petroleum Center 

Piedmont 

Pittsburg 15 20 

Reed Crude 43 

Reed Crude, New Issue. .4.00 4.50 

S. F. & McKittrick ... . 3.00 

San Joaquin O. & D 4.50 

Section Seven 

Senator 62 .75 

Shamrock 

Sovereign 38 .40 



2-55 
•05 



2.65 
.20 



Sterling 

Sunset (Or) 

Superior 

Teck 1. 10 

Thirty-three 

Toltec .20 

Twenty-eight 4.00 

Union 

United Petroleum 

West Shore 2.70 3.05 

Western Petroleum 

Wolverine 



WANTED 



A man who will advance cash 
to put down one deep oil well on 
fifty acres of proven land, with 
two wells now pumping 30 grav- 
ity oil. Tools, engines boilers and 
casing on the property free from 
debts ; land patented. Will give 
a large interest in the property 
for the money advanced. 

Apply to 

A. D. ELWELL, 

605 Grant Bldg. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



\ 



M w 



ALL THE WAY 

CHICAGO 
In 3 Days 



9:30 



Trains leave Union Ferry Depot, San Fran- 
cisco, as follows: 

7aa A. M.~*BAKERSFIKI,D LOCAX,;Due 
*»lll Stockton 10:40 a. m., Fresno 2:40 p. m., 
•WW Bakersfield 7:15 p. m. Stops at all points 
in San Joaquin Valley. Corresponding 
train arrives 8:55 a. m. 

9aa A. M.-g-THE CALIFORNIA I.IMIT- 
•aII ED;" Due Stockton 12:01 p. m., Fresno 
•"" 3:20 p. m., Bakersfield 6:00 p. m., Kansas 
City 3rd day 2:35 a. m., Chicago 3rd day 
2:15 p. m. Palace Sleepers and Dining 
Car through to Chicago. No second class 
tickets honored on this train. Corres- 
ponding train arrives n:ro p. m. 
A. M.— *VAIABY LIMITED; Due 
Stockton 12:01 p. m., Fresno 3:20 p. mi 
Bakersfield 6:00 p. m. The fastest train 
in the Valley. Carries Composite and 
Reclining Chair Car. No second class 
tickets honored on this train. Corres- 
ponding train arrives 11:10 p. m. 
4Afk P. M.— * STOCKTON LOCAL; Due 
Mill stoc kton 7:10 p. m. Corresponding train 
•WW arrives h:io a. m. 

8 An P. M.~ *OVERLAND EXPRESS ; Due 
Mill Stockton 11:15 P- m -. Fresno 3:15 a. m. 
• vv Bakersfield 7:35 a. m , Kansas City 4th 
day 7:00 a. m., Chicago 4th day 8:47 p. in. 
Palace and Tourist fcleepers and free Re- 
clining Chair Cars through to Chicago. 
Also Palace Sleeper which cuts out at 
Fresno. Corresponding train arrives 
*:25 p. m. 
* Daily § Mondays and Thursdays 

Tuesdays and Fridays. 
Personally Conducted Parties for Kansas 
City, Chicago and East leave on Overland Express 
Monday, Thursday and Saturday at 8:00 p. m. 
Ticket Offices, 641 Market Street and in Ferry 
Depot, San Francisco ; and 1112 Broadway 
Oakland. 



Notice of Assessment. 



HIGH GRAVITY OIL COMPANY; 
Principal place of business, city and 
county of San Francisco, State of Cali- 
fornia. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meet- 
ing of the Board of Directors of the 
High Gravity Oil Company held on the 
18th day of November A. D. 1903, an 
was levied upon the capital stock of the 
corporation, payable immediately to the 
Secretary of the corporation at its office 
No. 423 Market street, in the city and 
county of San Francisco, State of 
California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment 
shall remain unpaid on the 23rd day of 
December, 1903, will be delinquent and 
advertised for sale at public auction and 
unless payment is made before, will be 
sold on Wednesday the 13th day of 
January A. D. 1904, to pay the delinquent 
assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors. 
D. ROSENBLUM, Secretary. 
Location of office No. 423 Market 
street, city of San Francisco, State of 
California. 



UNION 
PACIFIC 

Suggests 

Speed 
and 
Comfort 

S. F. Booth, Gen. Agent. 

1 Montgomery St., S. F. 

Phone, Exchange 300. 



AMERICAN CONSOLIDATED 
Oil Company 



TO THE EAST 

VIA 

SUNSET ROUTE 

Means a Trip Taken 

IN COMFORT 

Oiled Track==No Dust 
Oil-Burning Engines 
No Cinders 
No Frost==No Snow 

SUNSET LIMITED 

San Francisco to New Orleans 

EVERY BAY 

Dining car, meals a la carte 

Observation Car 

Vestibuled Pullman Sleepers 
Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, 

£1 Paso, San Antonio, 

Houston, Beaumont and 

Texas Oil Fields. 

Southern Pacific 



A. B. Butler, 

President 



J. A. 



Chanslop, 

Vice President 



13,750 shares of stock for sale at 
8 cents per share — par value $1.00 

P. W. SPAULDING 

ATTORN EY-AT-LAW 

Evanston - Wyoming 

613 Market St., San Francisco. 



Have You Securities 

that pay no dividends and you want 
some that do? If you want to buy, sell 
or exchange investment stocks, or if you 
want gilt-edge shares in operating com- 
panies, address the Debenture Surety 
Company, Rialto Bldg., San Francisco, 
which also incorporates, finances and 
operates good enterprises. 



THE NATIONAL SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

Oil Well Supplies 
Drilling and 
Fishing Tools 

Fitler Cables-best in the world 

We carry in stock heavy 7$^-in. ( 5$4-in. and 
4^2-ln. Boston Casing, in addition to all the 
standard sizes and weights. 6-in., 8-ln. and 
10-in. Boston Drive Pipe always on hand. 

Pacific Coast Headquarters 

117 North Main Street 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Branches: 

Bakersfield and McKittrick, al. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 5. No. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1903. 



Prick, Tun Chnts. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published TTllMj 
theoa Authority of the Vsctficcoan 

t:a«W«»d By California PstenUum Mlaars' Association 



MRS. MARIA ROSA WINN, Proprietor. 
!•:. S. BA8TMAN, 

hMitor and Business Manager 

OSHtCB AND KDITOKIAL ROOMS 

318 P!ne Street, San Francisco, California 

Telephone, Bash 176. 

TERMS 
On Vui |J 50 

SIX MOHTH5 ISO 

THKKB MONTHS I 00 

Smoli Copib IOC 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 

Monkt should be sent by Postal Order. Draft .1 Registered 
Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil Reporter, 318 Pine street. San 
Francisco, rooms 11-31-33. Comrounicatioflsmust be accompanied 
by writer's name and address, not necessarily for publication, 
bat as a guarantee of stock, faith. 

Entered in the Postoffice at San Prandaco. California, ts sec 
ond class matter. 

HALF MOON BAY. 

The recent strike in the Half Moid Bay 
oil field is the result of nearly two years' 
work in this tract, by J. E. Kerr, of San 
Francisco and his eastern associates. The 
discovery is now recognized as one of the 
greatest of the California oil district. 

A number of wells have been drilled In 
this district with varying success, most of 
them being small producers. This gusher is 
the first in the district, and the only one in 
California with such quality of oil. 

Mr. Peter Holmes, who is the superin- 
tendent upon the property, slates that 
every precaution was taken against fire, but 
in spite of this, the terrific explosion oc- 
curred which tore the derrick to pieces and 
brought disaster to four men working at the 
place, who were seriously burned. The 
men are now, happily, all well on the road 
to recovery. 

It has been stated by eye-witnesses of the 
fire that the flames seemed to jump an im- 
measurable distance into the sky, causing a 
flame which was seen for many miles 
around. 

Mr. Holmes, who was at the time five miles 
distant from the well on the other side of 
the mountain heard the explosion and saw 
the great volume of flame. With his double 
team extended to its best and his light 
buggy rocking from side to side of the road 
Mr. Holmes rushed toward the scene. His 
course lay by the side of the creek which 
for three miles was in flames. The little 
bridge which he crossed was ablaze and 
nearly burnt away at the time. 

He covered the distance in less than six- 
teen minutes and arriving on the oil covered 
ground which seemed to be literally burn- 
ing for a considerable distance in all direc- 
tions he immediately called for blankets, 
pipe and hose. Wrapped in wet blankets 
the plucky superintendent fought his way 
to the casing of the flaming well, the mouth 
of which was some eight or ten feet above 
the surface of the ground. With the pipe 
and hose, which had been connected with 
the boiler, the fight was made and the 
flames choked in the pipe by a volume of 
steam. 



The importance of the strike in this well 
has caused great interest to center in the 
Half Moon Bay district. The oil is of 52 
gravity and parafhne base. The lands In 
the neighborhood ol the gusher are largely 
controlled by J. E Kerr and his associates, 
who are contemplating even more extensive 
developments in this field. Repairs are be- 
ing hastened upon the well where the ex- 
plosion occurred, and the derricks, which 
were burned away, have already been re- 
placed. The well will be put in good shape 
as soon as possible and will undoubtedly be 
a very large producer of high grade oil. 

The Wisconsin company, another oper- 
ator in this territory has a well now down 
almost t,6oo feet, and although this well is 
not completed, it has already produced large 
quantities of oil. The Paxton company, also 
holding land in this field is now down 1,600 
feet with 6-inch drive pipe. 



ALMA PAYS DIVIDENDS. 



In our last issue we stated that the Alma, 
one of the independent companies of the 
Kern River field, paid a dividend of 3 cents 
on the 1st of December and that the last 
dividend paid before this was on June 1st 
and amounted to the same, making an an- 
nual return of 6 per cent on the investment. 
This was an error inasmuch as the Alma has 
paid four quarterly dividends during the 
year as follows: March, 3 per cent; June, 3 
percent; September, 3 percent; December, 
3 per cent. The total amount of the divi- 
dends amount to $45,600. We wish there 
was more company's like the Alma. 



STUDYING 



OIL SITUATION 
JAPAN. 



IN 



Professor Edmond O'Neill, of the Uni- 
versity of California, who is making a trip 
around the globe studying the oil situation 
in the several great oil fields, has reached 
Japan and will make a thorough investi- 
gation of conditions there before sailing for 
home. Professor O'Neill has visited many 
ol the isolated districts in Europe and Asia, 
and, upon his return to California, will 
make use of the knowledge he has gained 
in the past few months, in giving special 
courses in the study of oils. 



CALIFORNIA'S PRODUCTION. 



Last week we made a rough estimate on 
the output of oil in California for 1903 and 
our total put it correctly at 25,000,000 bar- 
rels. The state mining bureau has recently 
issued a bulletin in which it puts the total at 
this figure, divided among the various fields 
as follows: Kern River, 16.800,000; Coallnga, 
2,500,000; McKlttrick, 1,250,000; Santa 
Maria, 1,000,000; Summerland, 100,000; Ful- 
lerton, 200,000; Whittier, 1,000,000; Los An- 
geles, 1,000,000; Sunset and Midway 300,- 
000. This latter includes probable ship- 
ments only. The Sunset and Midway fields 
have been at a great disadvantage owing to 
an almost total lack of transportation. We 
consider the field one of the best in the 
state and with the advent of the pipe line 



and railway now being put in will piove 
Itself such. It is very probable that the pro- 
duction of the field has been over 1,000,000 
barrels during 1903. The average price of 
oil in the state for the year has been 34 
cents per barrel, making the total valuation 
of the product $4,692,189. 



New Use for Petroleum. 

An eastern trade Journal says that it is 
well known that If Southern cattle are en- 
tirely freed from the species of ticks known 
as the Boophilus annulatus, they can be al- 
lowed to mingle with the most susceptible 
animals without danger. Many efforts bave 
been made to discover a practicable method 
for destroying this parasite without injuring 
the cattle, and the Bureau of Animal Indus- 
try has experimented for years with this ob- 
ject in view. Such treatment, if successful, 
would relieve most of the Southern cattle 
from quarantine restrictions, and would make 
these cattle bring more money in the markets 
of the country. After many failures, ap- 
parent success has been reached by dipping 
the cattle in the crude oil obtained from cer- 
tain Texas wells. This oil Is heavily charged 
with sulphur, and in the experiments so far 
made has not materially affected the cattle. 
It is necessary to regard such a treatment 
with some reserve until a large number of 
animals have been treated under the condi- 
tions which obtain in the practical shipment 
of cattle from the infested district to the mar- 
kets ; but it may be said now that this oil 
has been tried at the animal industry experi- 
ment station near Washington with entirely 
successful results, being distinctly superior 
to any other substance tested, and that it 
has also been tried in the field with about 70 
head of cattle, the effect being equally favor- 
able. Arrangements are now made for using 
the treatment on a much larger number of 
animals, and if, as hoped, no objections to it 
develop, it will be of Inestimable value to the 
cattle industry of the Southern States. 



The Payment of Dividends. 



When a company pays dividends simul- 
taneously with the sale of treasury stock, it 
is almost certain that these dividends are 
bsing paid from the proceeds of the stock 
sales and for the purpose of causing a de- 
mand for the stock. No legitimate company 
will adopt this method, and any company 
that practices it can safely be classed as a 
" wild cat " by the prospective Investor. It 
often happens that when questioned regard- 
ing the dividend the promoter will say that 
the stock is being sold for the purpose of 
making some improvement at the properry 
or to secure money for the purchase of ma- 
chinery. Why should he not put the divi- 
dends into machinery ? For the reason that 
this would stop the dividends and also stop 
the sale of stock among an ignorant class of 
investors he is catering to. The average in- 
vestor of today is learning to pick out the 
good ones from the bad. In most cases the 
proposition stands condemned in his eyes 
where dividends are being paid simultane- 
ously with the sale of treasury stock or 
where dividends are guaranteed, 
promoters will adopt neither 
niethods. 



of 



Clean 
these 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



Wyoming's Oil Fields. 

Eighteen oil fields are known to exist in 
Wyoming, and many more will be discovered 
when prospected for. In each of these fields 
oil is flowing from springs, or there are thick 
bands of oil sand exposed, and many test 
wells have been put down, but the first real 
dry hole has yet to be found. 

The greater number of these fields are 
situated in the central part of the state, but 
there are fields in the northeastern part, in 
southwestern portion, and in the northern 
central region. The oils that have been 
analyzed vary in nature from high-grade 
lubricating to oils that will produce from 40 
to 50 per cent of kerosene. On the Popo 
Agie river, ten miles south of Lander, in 
Fremont county, are three wells that are 
considered good for 200 barrels a day each. 
These wells have laid idle for years, because 
of the lack of railroad or pipe lines for trans- 
portation. From what is known at the 
present time, Wyoming will, when the oil 
fields have been developed, produce as much 
oil as any of the central western states. 
With proper facilities for transportation, the" 
oil industry in Wyoming will be second to 
none. 

The greatest development is found in 
Natrona county, where a lubricating oil has 
been found which has been pronounced by 
experts to be the best in the world. The 
same can be said of the oil found in Uinta 
county. Two thousand square miles have 
been prospected in Natrona county, and large 
quantities of oil have been discovered. 

The first oil well was drilled in 1884, on 
Poison Spider creek, by a Denver company. 
Wells were also drilled in the- Rattlesnake 
district. But the principal wells are located 
on Salt creek, a distance of fifty miles from 
Casper. At Casper the Pennsylvania Oil & 
Gas company has a refinery which has a daily 
capacity of 200 barrels of crude oil. The 
product is hauled from the wells In wagons 
that have a carrying capacity of 18,000 
pounds, each train of wagons requiring 
twelve to sixteen mules. 

Fremont county has large oil fields and 
the only flowing wells. The springs where 
the Murphy wells are located were dis- 
covered by Bonneville in 1833 and the oil 
has been used for medicinal and lubricating 
purposes ever since. The oil is found in the 
Paleozoic strata, and in this respect this field 
resembles more closely the oil fields of the 
eastern states than any other Rocky Moun- 
tain field. The wells already drilled will 
produced close to 1,000 barrels a day. 

The Popo Agie petroleum appears almost 
black, although in thin layers it is reddish 
brown by transmitted light. There is no 
perceptible fluorescence, and the distillates 
are not nearly so fluorescent as those of Salt 
creek oil. The odor and taste are strong and 
unpleasant, and on distilling the oil vapors 
of very disagreeable odor are given off, 
doubtless compounds of sulphur. The per 
cent of sulphur is about the same as that 
found in the Ohio oil. As a natural lubricat- 
ing oil to be used in its crude state, the Popo 
Agie oil is not as good as some of the other 
oils found in the state, but upon refining this 
oil contains no products that cannot be 
thrown either into illuminating or heavy lu- 
bricating oil. Just east of the Popo Agie oil 
fields are the Beaver field and the Shoshone 
field and to the northwest the Roshue oil 
fields, all in Fremont county. 

In Natrona county are the various fields: 
Big Horn, Rattlesnake, Prago, Semino and 



two other pools in the northern part of the 
county. Oil has been found in the center of 
Johnson county, but the field is not being 
worked owing to the pool having no outlet. 

In the eastern part of Weston county, Is 
the Stockade oil field, which covers a large 
area. 

In Crook county are located the famous 
Belle Fouxche oil fields. 

A very Important field has been discovered 
in Uinta county, near Evanston. To the 
north is the Fossil oil field, and to the east of 
the Bear River field is the Spring Valley 
field, which is the most prominent and active 
one in the state. 



Petroleum in Northern Michigan. 



Another Industry Threatened. 

A story comes recently from the east that 
touches with a pleasant suggestiveness upon 
the gasoline automobile and its characteristic 
aroma. 

Two skunks, observing one of these motor 
cars approaching, at high speed, ran under a 
culvert. When the car had passed, and was 
eating up the road at a great pressure, the 
animals emerged, stood in the middle of the 
highway, and sniffed the breeze. Then one 
of them shook his head gloomily, and, look- 
ing at his companion, said: 

"Ah, what's the use!" 



Activity in Eastern Fields. 



The discovery of oil in the Rapid River 
country of the northern peninsula of Michi- 
gan was attended with somewhat peculiar 
circumstances. A thick, black substance 
which gathered in cavities in the rocks, re- 
resembllng [melted tar, has been known to 
exist there for upward of twenty years, and 
has been used for axle grease. About two 
years ago a farmsr named Hlbbard called 
the attention of a traveling salesman to this 
substance and the latter made an examina- 
tion. Thinking there might be some com- 
mercial value in the substance, he brought 
some samples of it to Milwaukee and sub- 
mitted them to James McGee and M. D. Kel- 
ley. They had the substance analyzed by a i 
chemist, who pronounced it crude petroleum, 
thickened by exposure to the weather. The 
chemist was sent up to the place from which 
the samples had been taken, and on his re- 
port a company was organized, machinery 
was purchased, and the work of drilling a 
well in the neighborhood was started. Oil, 
it is said, was found at a depth of 600 feet, 
but a vein of water also was struck at that 
depth, and it became necessary to keep this 
from mixing with the oil, by encasing the 
pipe which was being sunk for the well in 
one of larger dimensions. The well was then 
driven down to a depth of goo feet, and oil 
then came up to the top of the pipe. It has 
been claimed that had the well been prop- 
erly treated it would not have been neces- 
sary to go below the 600 foot line. 

With every prospect of success before 
them, the original company ran short of 
funds, was unable to raise money to continue 
the work, liens were filed against the prop- 
erty and it was placed in the hands of M. D. 
Kelley as receiver. 

After settling up the receivership a new 
company was formed, in which Mr. Kelley 
is largely interested, and since then the work 
of development has been carried slowly 
forward. The managers of the company 
now claim they have an oil well with a capa- 
city af 300 barrels of oil a day, and that it 
may exceed this with the proper appliances. 
However, as they had no tanks in readiness, 
or pumps properly to raise the oil to them 
the well was sealed up and allowed to lie idle. 



The Echo says that William Lang, Jr., of 
San Francisco, one of the pioneers in the 
Kern River oil field and owner of the Bald 
Eagle property on section 30, arrived in 
Bakersfield last week from Beaumont, Texas. 
Mr. Lang and associates are operating on a 
lease at Sour Lake, Texas, about twenty-six 
miles from Beaumont, and he brings an en- 
couraging account of the prospects in that 
field. Mr. Lang says that their own enter- 
prise is thriving and will be on a dividend- 
paying basis within a few months. There 
are a number of California men operating in 
the Texas fields, and they are all meeting 
with success. The Hay ward brothers of the 
Coalinga field have made two fortunes, Mr. 
Lang says, and Milton McWhorter, the Kern 
oil field pioneer, is also doing very well. 

The Sour Lake field is producing 40,000 
barrels of oil per day, and the Splndlerop 
yields 15,000 barrels. The Texas oil is sell- 
ing for 60 cents at the well with eager buy- 
ers. The market facilities in the Texas 
fields are exceptionally good and for this 
reason the price of oil is up and development 
is more active than ever before. There are 
half a dozen pipe lines now running to the 
gulf, and these lines are extended to new 
fields as soon as the first oil is struck. The 
Southern Pacific is in the Texas field and is 
getting hold of all the oil it can. Buyers are 
numerous and bid for oil as the old cotton 
buyers used to bid for cotton. 

Mr. Lang was also in the Louisiana fields 
and reports great activity there. 

All the drilling in the Texas fields is done 
by the rotary process. Mr. Sharp, who came 
here from Dallas, Texas, with a rotary ma- 
chine and found that it would not work in 
the Kern county fields, has become a multi- 
millionaire in the Texas fields. 

New companies going into the Texas fields 
are apt to think the corporation laws of the 
state oppressive, but longer experience, Mr. 
Lang says, convinces most of them of their 
justice and equity. If the laws are intelli- 
gently obeyed they Insure every man his 
his rights, but if they are transgressed the 
offending company may wake up some morn- 
ing and find its charter gone. All corpora- 
tions in the state are required to exhibit 5 
per cent of their capitalization before they 
can begin business, a provision that makes 
hard times for wild cat companies. 

Mr. Lang says that there have been reports 
among the oil men in Texas for several 
months that the Standard Oil company will 
build a big refinery at Bakersfield. 



Seeking New Territory. 



Producers of Pennsylvania oil have taken 
new hope and are now again talking "two 
dollar" oil by the incoming of the new year. 
All agree that the present is a good market-, 
but still to low when the cost of finding new 
production is taken into account. In nearly 
all of the lower southwestern districts it is 
expensive drilling, and machinery and sup- 
plies are very high. In the deep sand ter- 
ritory the average size of the new wells is 
growing smaller each week, and even those 
that come in above the average drain rapidly 
and soon find a place in the pumper list. 
The efforts to discover new territory have 
brought forth nothing but congested pools 
or some extensions to the old fields. Opera- 
tors have not given up all hope of finding 
new producing territory, but if any is to be 
revealed it has yet to be located. 



PACIFIC OIL RRPORTRR 



Oil for Fuel. 



Oil fuel has been ■ favorite field for the 
ingenuity of inventors for many years. The 
first applications appear to have been made 
in France, bnt numerous experimental instal- 
lations have followed, and In Russia its gene- 
ral employment may be said to have com- 
menced about 1870, when the development 
of the enormous oil supplies of the Apcheron 
peninsula became ac accomplished fact, and 
the first oil fuel steamer appeared on the 
Caspian sea. In the L'nlted States, where 
the crude oil of the Pennsylvania field con- 
tains a larger percentage of light oil, the use 
of liquid fuel until recently has been on a 
less extended scale ; now, however, the dis- 
coveries in California and Texas have pro- 
vided enormous supplies of crude oil, prac- 
tically only suitable for this service, and 
great advances have consequently been made 
In Its use. In this country many attempts 
have been made, but owing to the absence 
of regular supplies, progress has not been so 
rapid as in the cases mentioned above. The 
mauufacture of oil gas and carburetted 
water gas has, however, thrown on the mar- 
ket products of a character only suitable for 
fuel, and rendered its adoption possible on a 
1 mited scale. 

The different methods of burning oil fuel 
may be summarized as follows : (1) Those 
wherein it is burned In bulk form ; (2) in a 
sprayed or atomized condition ; and (3) con- 
sumed as vapor or gas, The first mentioned 
procedure has received most application in 
Russia, whereas the last has enlisted most 
attention in the United States owing to the 
lighter character of the oils ovailable. Gen- 
erally, however, the second or spraying sys- 
tem may be looked upon as the favorite, 
most generally adopted, and probably the 
most successful; hence the chief attempts at 
improvement appear to have been devoted 
to it. The most effective device is doubtless 
that requiring the last quantity of the 
atomizing agent (steam or compressed air) 
for operation, and until recently the atten- 
tion of workers in this direction has been 
centered on the burner employed, the cons- 
truction of the furnace, which is of as much 
importance for a good result, being some- 
what neglected. Further a due considera- 
tion of the admittance, distribution and tem- 
perature of the air for combustion is absolute- 
ly essential to success. 

The latest developments of spraying ap- 
paratus point to the employment of oil fuel 
under pressure, heated to a high temperature, 
sprayed with dry steam, and the fire fed with 
heated air for combustion. For steamers the 
use of oil fuel possesses advantages over coal 
in excess of those which can be urged in its 
favor when employed on land. Reduced 
storage space, less number of men required, 
an increased steaming capacity from a given 
supply of fuel, are points of the greatest 
value from the marine aspect of the question. 

For locomotives the assistance of oil fuel 
is valuable on the long runs without stopping, 
now becoming common, the difficulties of 
firing and the trouble from dirty fires being 
no longer present. The application in this 
direction has been much improved and sim- 
plified during the past few years with a view 
of securing the reliability of the apparatus 
under all conditions of service, and the 
method devised by Mr. Holden, of the Great 
Eastern railway, of arranging the apparatus 
has been extensively adopted owing to the 
opportunities it affords for the use of solid or 



liquid furl, or both, at will or as circum- 
stances may make most desirable. 

In Russia and United me hun- 

dreds of locomotives are regularly running, 
nsing oil as fuel : and numerous examples are 
to be found in this and other countries where 
has become an expensive commodity. 
For furnace work oil fuel offers unique ad- 
vantages, and many interesting applications 
have been made to meet the special require- 
ments of annealing, Uniperirg, metal 
melting, brazing etc. In glass making 
and enameling oil fuel has met with con- 
siderable adoption, and portable furuaces 
of all kinds are successfully operated with it; 
in bridge work, shipbuilding, etc., cil fired 
rivet furnaces are to be preferred to any form 
of solid fuel heating device. In storage oil 
fuel has many favorable features. It oc- 
cupies a minimum of space, does not deterio- 
rate by exposure, and is easier of transporta- 
tion and . istribution. In the far East and 
many otiental countries the Importation of 
fuel oil has now become a regular undertak- 
ing, and supplies are guaranteed in many 
cases where wood has become scarce and im- 
ported coal an almost prohibitive article. — 
London Petroleum Review. 



Liquid Fuel Experiments in the 
French Navy. 

Liquid fuel experiments made in the 
French navy have been chiefly confined to 
torpedo boats and submarines. Those con- 
ducted on board cruisers and battleships 
have been on an insignificant scale. Re- 
cently, however, experiments on the large 
scale have been conducted at Brest with 
mixed coal and petroleum. The object of 
the tests carried out on the cruiser Mar- 
seillaise under the supervision of M. Vuill- 
erme, Engineer-in-chief of Naval Construc- 
tion, was to determine the exact quantity of 
petroleum consumed, and the time required 
for getting up full speed without increasing 
the consumption of coal or the work of the 
staff. One hour was devoted to coal firing 
and two to mixed firing, the two lateral en- 
gines being kept simultaneously at work. 
Each engine only received the steam raised 
in one of the two sets composed of unequal 
numbers of boilers, which, differently fired, 
developed in the engines the same amount 
of horse-power. The forward set of eight 
boilers supplied the starboard engines with 
steam, while those further aft, consisting of 
a set of five, fed the port engine. During 
the first hour the starboard engine, fired 
with 50 kilogrammes of coal per square 
metre of grate, developed 2,850 horse-power 
and turned the screw at the rate of 96 revo- 
lutions per minute, while the port engine, 
with 80 kilogrammes of coal per square 
metre of grate, developed 2,600 horse-power, 
and drove the propeller at 93 revolutions 
per minute. During the two subsequent 
hours the quantity of petroleum added to 
the coal and injected under the boilers feed- 
ing the starboard engine amounted to 27 
kilogrammes per square metre of grate. A 
horse- power of 3,555 was developed and 104 
revolutions per minute were made by the 
screw. The furnaces feeding the port en- 
gine received 30 kilogrammes of petroleum 
per square metre and developed 3,000 horse- 
power, turning the screw 100 revolutions 
per minute. The results are considered 
most satisfactory, and our French petroleum 
contemporary, the "Journal du Petrole," 
predicts the adoption of liquid fuel by the 
French navy at an early date. 



S 

Cost of a Kansas Oil Well. 

Promoters of Kansas oil properties in the 
east have been holding out us an extra in- 
ducement to operators that an oil well can 
be drilled in the Kansas producing ri . 
for $750. This sum might represent the 
actual cost o!' a dry hole, but, accoi .i; 
reliable Information obtained by the Kansas 
Derrick, it is a good deal safer proposition 
for those who contemplate operating in the 
Kansas field to figure out that their well 
will cost them, hooked onto the power and 
ready to turn oil into the tanks, close to 
$2,000 than to estimate under this figure. 
It is also a great deal safer for those who are 
attempting to induce capital to locate in the 
oil industry in Kansas to give them figures 
which can be relied upon than to try to 
convince them tnat the work can be done 
for one-haif of the actual cost. 

The average depth of the Kansas well is 
850 feet, and drilling costs 85 cents a foot. 
The actual expense of completing and fit- 
ting up a producing well figures up about 
as follows: 

850 feet drilling at 85 cents $ 722.50 

40 feet 8^-inch casing at 63 cents 25.20 

loo feet 6^-inch casing at 51J2 cents '54.50 

700 feet 5-inch casing at jS^ cents. 269.50 

Shooting well 45.00 

Tubing, 850 feet at 14 cents ria.oo 

Pumping outfit for walking beam 22.00 

Sucker-rods, 850 feet, at 14V cents 38.25 

250-barrel tank, set up 160.00 

Teaming 45.00 

Toto1 J, 625 1 5 

The Kansas Derrick says: 

"The above figures are made up from 
actual basis on which material is purchased 
by the operators, and are sufficiently con- 
servative, and to them should be added the 
expense of the party having the operations 
in charge. If a field manager, his salary 
and expenses must be taken into consider- 
ation, or if the party owning the lease is 
looking after the work, his board at $2.00 a 
day, buggy hire for getting to the property 
and other incidental expenses will foot up 
quite a considerable sum, not less than $50, 
and before the well can be put in service 
with other wells on the lease, if a pumping 
plant is installed, the cost of connecting up 
with the power must be considered, and also 
the proportionate cost of the pumping plant 
on the basis of the number of wells it is re- 
quired to pump." 

Of course if a dry hole is struck, the cas- 
ing can be used at other wells, and no tub- 
ing or sucker rods will be necessary. The 
cost of the hole will then be a trifle more 
than the amount spent for drilling- As the 
wells are drilled almost entirely by ina- 
chines, the expense of a derrick, which runs 
from $300 to $450 in the eastern oil fields, is 
not estimated in the figures. 

Great Oil Consumer. 

A report has been made to E. H. Harri- 
man to the effect that 650 of the 1,400 loco- 
motives of the Southern Pacific company are 
now burning fuel oil instead of coal. It is 
the intention to change all the engines of 
the company into oil burners save 250 in use 
on the Central Pacific between Sacramento 
and Ogden and between Ashland and Port- 
land. 

More than half of the locomotives in use 
on the lines west of Ogden and El Paso are 
using oil." East of El Paso the company is 
going a little slow in changing from coal, 
owing to a decrease in the output of the 
Texas oil fields. The officials are of the opin- 
ion that the oil fields of Kern county, in 
this state are practically exbaustless.- -Ex. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



00<H>00<>0-0<M>©<><>0<><>00<K>0-0-00<>«><><>OC^^ 

Another Big Well in Wyoming. 

% Standard Reserve Oil Company of that State, Make 
i Big Strike. 



Authentic information received from the 
Wyoming field indicates that the Standard 
Reserve Oil company, which was organized 
in Chicago about a year ago, has made the 
most important oil strike in the history of 
the Spring Valley, Uinta county oil field. 
The well was brought in at the fifth oil 
zone at a depth of about 1,000 feet, and is 
doing fifty barrels a day of that high gravity 
illuminating oil that the country is noted 
for. News of this strike was sent out some 
little time ago, in a small way, but owing to 
certain rivalry and jealousy that exists in 
that field the true magnitude of the dis- 
covery has but recently been made public. 

The president and manager of the Stand- 
ard Reserve company is Mr. Charles O. 
Richardson, a Chicago gentleman, who has 
had a great many years experience in the 
various oil and mining fields of this country. 
In the early part of 1901, when the news of 
the discovery of oil in Uinta county was be- 
ing made public, Mr. Richardson made a 
visit to the field and was so favorably im- 
pressed with the indications that he made a 
hurried examination of the surrounding 
country and located all the land that he 
thought exceedingly good. It was Mr. 
Richardson that sold the Jager company the 
SWX ° f section 12, 15-118 where they 
brought in a good well last year, and, a 
little later, the Standard Reserve was or- 
ganized. Mr. Richardson was the pioneer 
oil man in the Uinta field and his company, 
as subsequent events have proven, were in 
on the ground floor. 

The well above mentioned is located on 
the Ej4 of section 12, 15-118 and very close 
to the center of the section. It is about two 
miles from the main line of the Union Paci- 
fic Railroad, about four miles from the town 
of Spring Valley and the same distance from 
Leroy, thus being very favorably located as 
regards transportation, etc. 

The company is to be congratulated on 
the management of their holdings in this im- 
portant field. This well is the second one 
free from water in the district. Altogether 
the Standard Reserve is, perhaps, the most 
enterprising company in Wyoming. Its acre- 
age is second to none, being over 1 1 ,000 acres, 
and, being principally located in the proven 
belt, or on the anticline on which all the oil 
in the field has been produced and which is 
conceded to be not more than two miles in 
width, is considered the most valuable hold- 
ings in the field. They get their coal for 
the expense of mining, large coal deposits 
being located on the property, and their 
water right is a very valuable one. The 
Standard Reserve has ordered tanks and 
pipe and will commence producing at once. 

Besides the Standard Reserve the prin- 
cipal companies operating nearby are the 
Atlantic & Pacific, and American Consoli- 
dated, both California corporations. All have 
producing wells. With the early spring we 
expect this field to develop into one of the 
greatest in the country. 

The productive oil zone in Uinta county, 
above referred to, extends from near the 



Utah line on the southwestern part of Uinta 
county to the east central part of the county, 
near Fontnell, more than a hundred miles 
north of the Oregon Short Line Railroad, 
passing just east of Hilliard, through Aspen, 
Spring Valley, east of Cumberland, through 
Diamonville and so on to the north. The 
formation can be plainly traced for the en- 
tire distance, and is locally known as 
"Oyster Ridge" so called from the fossils 
found therein. In a communication from 
Professor Knight, of the Wyoming Uni- 
versity, just previous to his death, he said 
that, in his opinion, oil would be discovered 
the entire length of this ridge at depths 
varying from 1,000 to 1,200 feet. A prospect 
hole put down near A.spen about a month 
ago tapped the oil at about 100 feet which 
extended the productive area some eight 
miles to the south and this latter strike of 
the Standard Reserve has proven up a con- 
siderable amount of territory to the north- 
ward. Of the dozen or more wells put 
down outside this strip, all have proven to 
be dusters with the exception of the Bettys 
well, in which a small showing of oil was 
encountered at 500 feet. That the country 
has several oil sands is shown from the fact 
that the Standard Reserve passed through 
five distinct strata in reaching a depth of 
1,000 feet. 



Texas Oil and the Standard. 



A Chicago contemporary says that it is a 
mistaken idea that the Standard Oil is bene- 
fitting through the increased price of oil. 
For the year 1902 it increased the price of 
crude oil 34 per cent and the advance in 
the price of refined was but 24 per cent and 
the proportion in favor of crude oil this year 
has been far greater. Of course the Standard 
Oil company is a large producer of oil 
through its producing subsiduary company, 
the South Penn Oil company, the largest 
producer in the Pennsylvania and West Vir- 
ginia field and it shares in the advance in the 
price of crude oil, but the Standard buys the 
major part of its crude oil. 

It is evident that the Texas oil fields are 
destined to play an important part in the 
future lighting of the world. The Texas 
field is producing about 1,400,000 barrels of 
oil per month or within 200,000 barrels of 
the Indiana and Ohio production. The gen- 
eral activity in the Texas oil refining indus- 
try is looked upon as good proof that the 
refining of the Texas product has passed 
the experimental stage. There are four or 
five large refineries in Texas now and the 
Standard Oil company, through its subsidu- 
ary company, the Security Oil company, 
owning the Burt refinery at Port Arthur, is 
planning to expend $5,000,000 in adding to 
its plant, making it the largest oil refinery 
in the world. 

No better evidence is needed as to the 
success of the treatment of Texas oil for illu- 
minating purposes than this proposed ex- 
penditure on the part of the Standard com- 
pany. While the quality of the Texas oil is 
poor compared with the Pennsylvania pro- 
duct and the profit in treatment small, the 
declining stocks in the other fields make the 
treatment of this Texas product Imperative. 



I NEWS FROM TBE FIELD » 

Supplied by our Regular Correspondents 



Coalinga Letter. 

Coalinga, Dec. 16, 1903. 

The Hanford Oil company is still at work 
on number 5, but expect to have the well 
producing soon. 

Oil City Petroleum company is erecting 
another storage tank, in addition to its 
present storage capacity of nearly 5,000 
barrels. 

Twenty Eight Oil company is still drilling 
on number 8 which is being deepened to the 
same sand from which number 9 is pumping. 

The Independence Oil company has com- 
pleted a 2,000 barrel storage tank on its lease. 
This company is one of the largest producing 
companies in the Coalinga field, pumping 
from eight wells. It delivers its oil to the 
Union Oil company. 

A derrick has just been erected on the 
southeast quarter of section 30-19-15, for- 
merly the property of the iEtna Petroleum 
company. There is no intention of begin- 
ning development very soon. 

After a temporary shut down, the Key- 
stone Oil company has resumed drilling this 
week. 

The New S. F. Crude Oil company spud- 
ded in on its number 3 well two weeks ago. 
Herring Bros, have the contract for drilling 
the well. 

More activity is displayed on the Commer- 
cial Petroleum company's lease than on any 
other property in the field. The company's 
two producing wells are keeping up a pro- 
duction of nearly 500 barrels per day of a 21 
gravity oil, nunber 3 is now penetrating the 
first oil sand, number 4 is 900 feet deep and 
number 5 is ready to begin dril'ing as soon 
as number 3 is finished. In addition to all 
these wells, Mr. Livermore has a contract for 
three more wells to be drilled. When all 
are completed the Commercial will have 
eight wells, all indicative of a fine produc- 
tion, judging from the experience of its pres- 
ent two wells. The company has levied an 
assessment of one dollar per share with 
which to continue the present aggressive 
work. 

The P. C. O. is laying a 4-inch line to con- 
nect to the Caribou Petroleum company's 
tanks on section 22. 

After persistent effort to get well No. 2 of 
of the Section Seven Oil company to flowing, 
the 'abors were finally well rewarded in 
a gusher of equal magnitude, if 1 ot exceed- 
ing No. 1. All during the latter part of last 
week and the early part of this week it has 
been spouting spasmodically steady streams 
of oil out of a 5 i/z -inch casing as high as 
thirty feet above the top of the derrick. A 
little more agitating and baling will undoubt- 
edly result In bringing forth a steady stream 
of oil, of a production conservatively esti- 
mated at 2,000 barrels per day. With the 
daily output of 1,000 barrels from well No. 1, 
and the new gusher as it is now showing up, 
will bring the Section Seven Oil company to 
the front as the largest producing company 
in the field. 

The two 3,000-barrel iron gauge tanks for 
the Esperanza Oil company have been fin- 
ished. The iron for the 20,000-barrel stor- 
age tank is now being hauled, and work on 
i Continued on Page Eleven. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



the streams in a densely wooded country In 
flood time contain large <|uantities of leaves 
and other woody detritus. The most of this 
Is ground to powder in the rush of water and 
sand in the upper reaches of the streams, 
and consequently when this light matter is 
deposited as silt in the still waters of the 
ocean or bays, very few people stop 
to think that the deposit is largely com- 
posed of this woody detritus which of course 
is entirely protected from decay by Its 
covering of water and accumulating like de- 
posits above It. 

Such deposits sometimes contain upwards 
of 50 per cent of vegetable matter, and as 
they are known to generally attain a thick- 
ness of thousands of feet and many miles in 
extent, (a series of them sometimes extend- 
ing hundreds of miles irregularly.) It 
doesn't take much figuring to convince us 
that in a few millions of years, which is a 
mere speck of time in the life of our globe, 
a vast amount of calorific power is seem- 
ingly lost in this way. 

But nature's compensations are supposed 
to be absolute, and in the end all losses are 
made good, for no matter can be lost or de- 
stroyed, it is only changed into other forms 
of matter, or into forms of energy or force, 
and can be reconverted into matter again. 

Taking such series of strata as are eroded 
sufficiently to admit of examination, like, for 
example, the rocks of southern Utah and 
Arizona, that crop out partly in the Grand 
canyon, we learn that many continuous (In 
time) deposits of several miles in thickness 
were formed, either by a single subsidence, 
or by a series of subsidences that were 
practically continuous, allowing the region 
in time to fill up with the organic remains 
of creatures that lived and died in the sea, 
or with the debris that was washed into it, 
or, at least, into the subsiding basin, for 
much of the heavier portion of this debris 
was deposited before it reached the sea or 
ocean. 

All that portion of vegetable matter that 
is deposited on the ocean floor contains its 
carbon or heat producing potentiality, which 
remains unchanged unless it reaches a depth 
of several miles, when the heat is sufficient 
to volatilize it, and if the region continues 
to subside the accumulation of volatilized 
carbon will have a tendency to percolate 
upwards and remain in the zone of heat that 
borders its melting point. This zone or 
horizon thus becomes a region of deposits of 
carbonaceous products such as petioleum, 
coal, natural gas, bitumen, strata of rock 
more or less bitumenized or petroliferous. 
Immense beds of salt also occur in these 
horizons, inter-stratified with layers of shale 
in much the same manner as coal. It is not 
contended, however, that the salt is neces- 
sarily volatilized, as it may have been de- 
rived by evaporation under conditions of 
aridity such as prevail in desert countries 
today. 

Another series of carbonaceous products, 
of which diamonds are an example, are 



««><><><>00<)<><)000<>0<K><M><><)00<>00«0<>00^ 

A California Expert's Theory, j 

How Petroleum Gets Into the Strata Where We Find I 
It.-By William Plotts. 

i*OOOCO<KX><><>0<><K)<><)(K><>«><>0<KK)<>OI><X)*0^ <XXX>CXXKX>OOOOooo 

Every observing person has noticed that 

tormed around the vent pipes of volcanoes 
where they have Issued through silted de- 
posits that had never subsided sufficiently 
to have their carbon volatilized by the heat 
of mere depth. 

That the series of products such as pe- 
troleum and coal were formed in the manner 
set forth everything in the manner of their 
occurrence indicates. 

Petroleum, with which we are most inter- 
ested, occurs in any kind of porous rock or 
strata that happens to be in the zone of 
vol tilization of the carbon at the time of 
maximum submergence of the deposits, 
sand or gravel formed in beds or strata by 
the action of the waves or in River channels, 
or porous limestone. It is found sometimes 
io sandstone or limestone as hard as marble; 
then, again, as in Russia and some parts of 
California, the sand strata in which it occurs 
is not compacted into rock but is so soft that 
the pressure of the expanding gas pulver- 
izes it, so that large quantities of it some- 
times issues with the oil. It sometimes oc- 
curs in rock so fine grained as to have the 
appearance of slate or fine shale, and from 
which the oil has to be removed by heating. 
Coal is merely a petroleum-soaked shale 
which has retained the carbon until it 
crystallzed. 

At the time of maximum submergence be- 
fore the silted strata with the volatilized 
carbon above them began to emerge again, 
the latter must have been spread out In a 
sheet, or in a series of sheets nearly or quite 
horizontal, although the strata with which it 
is blended may not have been, as one side 
or portion of the region may have subsided 
more rapidly than the rest, this is the con- 
dition in which most of the carbon product 
is found. That is, in benches, sometimes 
overlapping each other independently of 
any faulting that may have occurred. 

The earth movement, or lateral pressure, 
which is so manifest in California, in its 
crushing and folding of the strata, is gener- 
ally supposed to have been caused by, and 
is still being caused by the shrinking of the 
earth, causing the crust to buckle, in accom- 
modating itself to the reduced size. Now 
thil is exactly the results to be appre- 
hended from a shrinkage of the earth, but 
such shrinkage does not sufficiently account 
for all the buckling that has occurred 
throughout the earth's crust, and it is pro- 
bable that the expansion by heat of the sub- 
siding areas, will account for much more of 
it than the shrinkage of the earth, while the 
emerging areas, instead of contracting, do so 
only locally, manifested by the kind of cry- 
stallzation called cleavage, which occurs in 
all strata that has emerged, regardless of its 
proximity to regions of crushing or folding. 
Then again, this region in its emergence 
may have arisen irregularly and if it was iu 
a locality of acute crushing the strata may 
have developed an extremely disturbed and 
complex appearance, but the horizon of the 
carbonaceous products is not likely to be as 
far removed from the horizontal as the strata 



•re, for the reason that the strata was snb- 
I to this buckling process before the 
products were formed in place, a . well as 
alterwards. This relation o; the oil .11 

>n to the strata is well exemplified in 
western New York, Pennsylvania and West 
Virginia, which is a region of very mild dis- 
turbance of the strata, over a very large 
area. From Niagara falls to Mannlugton. 
West Virginia, the strata dips about 4,500 
feet, the distance being about 250 miles, 
while the hori/.on represented by petroleum 
almost this entire distance has only about 
half the dip, the petroleum disappearing in 
Individual strata to appear again regularly 
in higher strata to the southward, the latter 
locality being 600 to 800 feet higher In its 
general surface than Niagara falls. In a re- 
gion of former subsidence and subsequent 
emergente such as we are considering, 
where the rich silted strata yielded up their 
store of carbon which concentrated in a 
horizon that afterwards emerged and had 
its covering eroded away, some of it en- 
tirely, so that some of the valuable products 
were disintegrated and lost, in other places 
leaving them uninjured but within easy 
reach of our tools. We have an analogy in 
the oil fields at our own doors. 



Roumania Opposes Standard. 

A dispatch from Vienna says that reports 
from Bucharest indicate that the Standard 
Oil company is meeting with much opposi- 
tion in its efforts to obtain a footing in Rou- 
mania. At a private meeting of the sup- 
porters of the government, M. Stourdza, 
president of the Council of Ministers, de- 
clared that the Americans had come to Rou- 
mania for the purpose of monopolizing the 
national petroleum industry and that they 
must prevent the country from submitting 
to such an economic yoke. 

It is stated that the Standard Oil com- 
pany has now abandoned its intention of 
combining any of the existing oil concerns 
of Roumania, but that, believing the coun- 
try has large and valuable oil fields at pre- 
sent undiscovered, the company will en- 
deavor to obtain them for its European trade. 

Standard Increase Capital Stock. 



An Albany, New York dispatch says that 
the Standard Oil company of New York 
city today filed with the secretary of state a 
certificate of increase of capital stock from 
$7,000,000 to $15,000,000. This Is a sub- 
sidiary corporation of the Standard Oil com- 
pany of New Jersey, the capital of which Is 
$96,000,000. 

This Increase is agreed to unanimously by 
all the stockholders in the company. The 
stockholders named are: William Rocke- 
feller, H. M. Flagler, John D. Archbold, H. 
H. Rogers, W. H. Hilford, Z. T. Barston, C. 
M. Pratt, E. E. Bedford, O. A. Moffatt, W. 
D. McMillan, Joseph E. Lecour and H. A. 
Wilkinson. 



FOR SALE 

A complete oil well drilling 
outfit near Huntington, Ore- 
gon. Inventory and price 
on application to 
H. V. GATES, HUlsboro, Oregon. 



s 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Methods for Testing Petroleum 
Products. 



II. PETROLEUM. 

i. Stamer's colorimeter Is retained for test- 
ing the color. 

2. Determination of fluorescence is not 
necessary. 

3. For the discovery of capillarity the de- 
termination is accomplished in an Engler 
petroleum viscosimeter with narrow outlet 
openings. By determination of the ascent 
in the wick the wick is to be watched with 
regard to the different conditions. The ar- 
rangement of the experiment for the de- 
termination of the suction of oils is under- 
taken with blotting paper of the same 
quality. 

4. According to the former resolutions 
prepared for lubricating oils nothing is to be 
observed for the determination of the speci- 
fic gravity with the officially gauged areo- 
meter. 

5. The customary normal temperature of 
15° C. with water unit of -[- 4° C. is retained 
for the determination of specific gravity. 

6. Nothing is to be observed with regard 
to the determination of the flash point in 
Abel's apparatus. 

The fractional distillation is accomplished 
in Engler's glass apparatus. 

(a) The distillates are those to 150 , 150 
to 200°, 200° to 250°, 250 to 275 , 275° to 
300° C. and the parts boiling above 300° C. 
are to be determined from the difference. 

(b) The expression "boiling beginning" 
is to be substituted for boiling point. Boil- 
ing beginning is that point at which the 
first drops fall from the cooler end of the 
Engler apparatus. 

(c) That point at which six drops, at 
most, fall from the cooling pipe through re- 
peated heating to the fraction point is con- 
sidered as the end point of a fraction. 

(d) In general the fractionating is under- 
taken volumetrically. Only In particular 
cases is the determination of the gravity of 
the distillate desirable. 

(e) Attention may be paid to the differ- 
ence ia the temperature of the weighed or 
measured fractions only in so far as the dis- 
tillates to be measured are naturally cooled 
to the temperature of the room before 
measuring. 

(f) The discovery of the undistilled residu- 
ums is generally not necessary outside of 
the determination of the elements boiling 
above 300 C. 

(a) The determination of acids is carried 
on titrlmetrically in the well-known with at 
least 100 ccm. of oil under the solution of 
the petroleum in alcoholic ether. 

(b) Beside the acid determination there Is 
the natron test to be undertaken as de- 
scribed in Muspratt's Technical Chemislry. 
With the positive results of the test the 
presence of naphtha acid salts is established 
by the ash test after reducing to ashes one 
liter of oil, which is next distilled to a small 
residue (about 30 cm). With negative re- 
sults of the natron test no reduction to 
ashes takes place since then the presence of 
a perceptible amount of organic salts is not 
assumed. 

(c) On shaking together equal parts of 
petroleum and sulphuric acid of specific 
gravity 1.75 the latter should show only a 
very little coloration. 

(d) The method of shaking with sulphurie 
acid 1.83 serves for the determination of un- 
saturated carbureted hydrogen. A preced- 



ure is now in had to perfect the already 
well-known methods. 

11. With the establishment of the freezing 
point new samples are always to be made 
use of, and not samples which for a long 
time have been cooled to another degree of 
temperature. Without regard to the test, 
the freezing point of the distillation residuum 
is to be determined, and this is obtained by 
distilling the petroleum to 300 C. 

12. In general the determination of para- 
ffine is not to be made. With the eventual 
quantitative determination of the paraffine, 
according to the alcohol ether treatment, 
only the portions boiling over 250° C. are to 
be used. 

13 and 14. The sulphur determination is 
to be carried out quantitatively and is done 
according to the Henssler method. 

15 and 16. The gauged Hefner amylace- 
tate lamp is considered the light unit, the 
Lummer-Brodhim photometer head serves 
for accurate photometrical examination; for 
other examinations a fat speck photometer 
serves. 

(b) In general round burners are to be 
used in experiment lamps; for oils which re- 
quire a greater influx of air in order to burn 
freely, as, for example, Russian oils, Gallcian 
oils, etc., the kosmos burners (Schuster-Beer) 
are employed advantageously; the cording 
of the cylinder is to be so selected or the 
cylinder to be so placed that the maximum 
of the lighting power is reached with the 
fully developed flame. Oil reservoirs as 
broad as possible are always fixed on the 
experiment lamps, where, with the differ- 
ence in the height between the burning 
point and oil level, is little altered during 
the continuance of the experiment. 

(c) The length of time for burning should 
generally amount to six hours. Only in 
particular cases with exhaustive examina- 
tion can a longer time for burning be really 
preferable. 

preferable. 

(d) In the course of the first quarter of an 
hour the flame is put up to the greatest 
possible height, then one quarter cf an hour 
before the first photometric examination the 
flame is to be again raised, and thereafter it 
may be allowed to remain unregulated. 

(e) The photometric reading should be, in 
general, after two hours and then brought to 
conclusion. With accurate examination it 
is read after 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and even more hours, 
according to the duration of the burning. 

(f) The manner of observing the strength 
of the light is left to ihe observer, especially 
with the fat speck photometer. The height 
of the flame during the period of observation 
need not be especially measured. The 
crusty wick is to be carefully lifted off and 
weighed. 

(g) In general the entire consumption of 
oil is determined by weighing the lamps be- 
fore beginning and at the close of the burn- 
ing examination. For accurate determina- 
tion the lamp is to be weighed at each pho- 
tometrical examination. Incidental differ- 
ences in the temperature of the oil are with- 
out essential influence upon the weight. 

(h) Beside the average power of light and 
the entire consumption the consumption 
per hour is also to be added. 

17. Without practical burning examina- 
tion conclusions as to the burning value of 
the oils could be drawn only upon the basis 
of physical and chemical examinations if the 
origin of the oil was established without 
doubt. 



18. Beside the ordinary distillation test 
that part of the petroleum remains to be dis- 
tilled which is left after burning half of the 
oil in the lamp in order to reach a decision 
on the uniform composition of the oil before 
and after burning. 

1. All mineral oils permit themselves to 
be employed for the generation of gas by 
dropping on red hot surfaces. According to 
rule one employs oils of a specific gravity 
exceeding 0,850 and of viscosity below 3 
(water of -|- 4°=i), according to Engler. 

2. The color of the gas oil is of no im- 
portance in the valuation. 

3 to 5. Determination of the specific grav- 
ity, of the degree of fluidity and the flash 
point in the Pensky-Martin apparatus are 
carried out as set forth for lubricating oils. 

6 to 9. The distillation test is undertaken 
as with petroleum. The fractions are taken 
from 50 to 50°. It is of great importance to 
the gas generating value of an oil that the 
boiling limits are not separated too much. 
It is judicious to determine the boiling limits 
within which 80 per cent of the oil passes. 
The determination of the firm residuums is 
not recommended. 

10. The density is determined in a rea- 
gent glass In the ordinary manner. 

11. The determination of paraffine, ac- 
cording to Holde, should be permitted 
chiefly as an identity test. 

12. For the determination of creosote in 
gas oils 100 cc. oil is agitated with 100 cc. 
lye of 6° B. at the customary temperature for 
fiue minutes. The decrease in volume 
shows the creosote content. 

13. The sulphur content is determined ac- 
cording to Carins. 

14. With regard to the gas generating 
value, foreign admixtures (adulterated oils) 
are not to be tested, according to rule. 

15. The direct determination of the gas 
generating value, in general, should be 
effected only by apparata in the ordinary 
business way. The gas generating value of 
an oil setves only for the apparatus with 
which it is to be obtained. Moreover, for 
the final result the method of management 
is limited by the apparatus. (The retention 
of the gas by the compression in the present 
employment of gas oils is dependant more 
upon the manner of generating the gas than 
upon the nature of the oils.) 

16. Relative to the determination of gas 
generating value, according to Wernecke. 
Heifer's further experiments are to be ex- 
pected. 

17. The power of light is to be determined 
with a burner consuming 35 1. per hour. 
The measurements are to be made as with 
petroleum, and the gas consumption is to be 
measured with a gauged gas meter. 

18. A general requirement to estimate the 
gas generating value according to the units 
of valuation (for example, profit X power of 
light) is not to be recognized for time. 

19. The determinations directed for gas 
oil under 2 to 14 serve mostly for proving 
Identity. To what extent the projected 
methods of examination are to be supple- 
mented, especially through such examina- 
tions for oils which serve for the carbonating 
of water gases. 

1. In general the fraction of the mineral 
oils standing at the border between the illu- 
minating oil and gas oil is regarded as pol- 
ishing oil. 

2. Relative to the coloration of the polish- 
ing oil simple estimates without especial 
measurement are sufficient. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTKR 



3 and 4. Especial determinations relative 
to the odor are not necessary. 

5 to 7. Specific gravity, degree of fluidity 
and flash point in Pensky-Martin apparatus 
are to be determined as with lubricating oils, 
and serve, for the most part, as tests of iden- 
tity. 

8 to n. The distillation test Is effected, as 
with gas oils is Engler's glass bulbs. 

12. A freezing test should be accomplished 
in a reagent glass in the usual manner. 

13. The determination of the paraffine 
content can generally be omitted. 

14. In order to prevent the employment 
of oils subject to skin formations the ad- 
vantage of the creosote containing oils Is to 
be proved, whether the oils are neutral and 
creosote free, and do not react with natron 
lye. 

1. For the qualitative test for coal tar ben- 
zine solubility serves for an asphalt washed 
with petroleum benzine. The qualitative 
test for coal-tar benzine is effected by the 
determinations of the portions soluble in 
fuming sulphuric acid. 

2. Under crude benzine one understands 
those portions which boll at 150 C. Ac- 
cording to rule, rectified benzine should not 
contain portions boiling above 120 C. 

3. The color is given without special 
measuring. 

4 and 5. The determination of the specific 
gravity means of the gauged thermo-areo- 
meter at -|- 15 C. is effected as with other 
mineral oils. 

6 and 7. In general Engler's glass appar- 
atus is recommended for the distillation test 



of benzine as for petroleum, together with 
the orders applied berefor. For technical 
taxing examinations the official metal ap- 
paratus previously described is to be em- 
ployed. The fractionation is carried out In 
limits of 10 to 10 and by accurately testing. 
That point at which six drops flow from the 
cooling pipe serves as the final point of a 
fraction. 

8. The degree of refinement is deter- 
mined from the external appearance (color 
and odor'), and the behavior with concen- 
trated sulphuric acid. 

9. Beside the test for coal tar benzine it is 
to be tested for sulphur, etc., by carrying 
over in xanthic acid potash, for turpentine 
oil and pine oil, through the bromine reac- 
tion (turpentine oil and pine oil change color 
rapidly), especially by carrying over In 
nitrous (fat containing) one determines by 
evaporation, release of 100 cc. benzine in a 
water bath In the ordinary saucer and 
weighing of residuum. 

Under paraffines are understood the firm 
fat carbureted hydrogens, which originate 
with the distillation of bituminous crude 
materials. For the establishment of methods 
of testing only crude paraffine, paraffine 
scale and technically pure paraffine come 
into question. Liquid paraffines are not in- 
cluded here. 

1. With regard to the external appear- 
ance statement of the color is sufficient. 

2. A prescribed test for the constancy of 
the light does not appear to be necessary. 

3. The determination of the specific grav- 
ity of the paraffine serves chiefly as an iden- 



tity test, and can be undertaken by means 
of the alcoholic floating method at room heat 
in a completely air-free condition of the 
paraffine or at ioo' C. with tbe Mohr. scale. 

4. For the valuaticn of the trade paraffine 
the determination of the freezing point ac- 
cording to Shukoff should be made, also for 
the valuation of mixturers of paraffine with 
other products. Besides this the Halle 
method is allowed, also the determination of 
the melticg point in capillary pipes, by 
which the beginning point and end point of 
the melting are discovered. 

5- In general additions to paraffine are 
not made. In special cases the customary 
methods of chemical examinations are em- 
ployed. 

6. The paraffine content is to be deter- 
mined according to Holde in a simple man- 
ner, and mechanically freed from impurities 
and water. The impure contents are to be 
determined by melting the paraffine and 
washing with a solution in a weighed filter. 
Water cantent fs to be determined by dis- 
tillation, collecting the water and weighing 
or by heating the weighed paraffine, where- 
by the loss of weight caused by evaporating 
the paraffine Is determined— Naphtha. 



We manufacture the best 
lubricating oils for oil 
drillers 

KING KEYSTONE OIL CO., 
116 Front St., San Francisco. 



Monthly Exports of Oil from San Francico. 





Mineral, Crude, 


Mineral, Reeinfd, or Manufactured. 


Countries. 


INCLUDING NAT- 
URAL OILS, WITH- 
OUT REGARD TO 
GRAVITY. 


Naphtha, including 
All Lighter Prod- 
ucts of Distillation. 


Illuminating. 


Lubricating 

and Heavy Paraffine 

Oils. 


Residuum, including 

Tar and all other 
from which the light 
bodies have been dis- 
tilled. 




Gallons 


Value 


Gallons 


Value 


Gallons 


Value 


Gallons 


Value 


Bbls. 


Value 


August, 1903. 










300 

800 

4,890 

3oo 

34° 
7,200 


$7° 

167 

i,°32 

72 

66 

1,377 


2,165 


$929 








100 


$7 


44° 


$'°7 








230 


63 






























20 

28,660 

1,360 

722 


5 

6,319 

272 

187 






























































90 


19 












15,160 

14,400 
32,237 


1,822 

3,211 

3,723 
















38,149 

293,77° 

460 


6,830 

• 41,101 

116 


558 
16,777 


329 
5,441 








1,365,000 


45.5°° 














1,365,100 


J45.507 


62,237 


|8,86 3 


346,299 


$50,850 


50.492 


$13,545 






September, 1903. 














472 

80 

837 


$132 
3> 

282 
















1,050 
3.45° 
1,100 


$139 
723 
218 
















- 




























508 
190 
380 


56 

75 

165 
















1,960 
1,300 


3°8 
295 








































1,110 


jno 


1,260 


253 


158 


87 


















1,008,000 
1,806,000 


|36,ooo 
60,200 






45° 

125,500 

5° 


92 

I5.7°3 
13 


305 
7,417 


189 
2,943 








31,920 


4,538 














2,814,000 


$96,200 


33,°3o 


$4,648 


136,120 


$17,744 


10,347 


$3.9 6 ° 






October, 1903. 














479 
301 

3,147 


$144 

91 

1,048 












220 


$47 


600 
2,780 
2,200 


$120 
562 

444 






















700 
100 
100 


159 
18 
23 


























6,690 
200 


1,160 
44 


168 


76 








527 


134 


789 295 






























2.581 

300 

10,838 


564 
125 
















49° 
26,650 

5° 1 


114 
5,392 

9 

2 








2,772,000 


92,400 


21,766 


2,346 








718 I 414 
















10 j 








2,772.527 


192.434 " 


21,886 


$2,593 


39.270 1 


$7,847 II 


21,5' 


$7,279 H 







PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



NEWS FROM TDE COAST 



Recent Developments in California Fields, u 

Colusa. 

One of the derricks west of Williams is going to be 
taken down and moved elsewhere. We believe it is 
the one on the Harlan land. 

The Williams Oil company on the Van Gilt lease, 
have a fishing job on hand. A tool for this work 
was received this week. 

Superintendent Duffield of the Chehalis Oil and 
mining company writes us on the 9th, "I feel that 
you will congratulate the management of the Che- 
halis Oil and Mining company on having reached a 
depth of Soo feet in ten days less than two months — 
and 140 feet of formation was so hard that some 
days only 2 feet could be made. We have made 120 
feet in the last forty-eight hours. The manage- 
ment regrets to lose M. E. Waggy, who is called to 
Hollister tj erect a derrick for W. E. Youle, formerly 
of Arbuckle. Will Evans cf Williams, former tool- 
dresser for R. Shirk at the Bear Valley company's 
well, takes the place made vacant by the departure 
of Mr. Waggy." — Arbuckle Independent. 

Devil's Den. 

The Devil's Den district in northwestern Kern 
county may be opened soon after the first of the 
year by an automobile line to be operated by local 
capitalists from Bakersfield to Paso Robles in San 
Luis Obispo county, passing directly through the 
Devil's Den district, so long isolated and entirely 
without transportation facilities. The new company 
expects to do a large business hauling to and from 
this section now being extensively prospected by 
various companies. A station will be maintained in 
the field and a powerful traction engine with a train 
of freight wagons will be kept by the company es- 
pecially to handle the business of the oil district. 

Kern River Letter. 



BAKERSMEI.D, Cai,., Dec. 16, 1903. 

The approach of the holidays appear to be causing 
a comparative lull in the starting of new work in the 
fields of Kern county. The year now drawing to a 
close has been the most active in the history of the 
field in regard to actual productive work. There are 
now 760 wells completed and the most thorough can- 
vass of the district and the most carefully prepared 
estimates show that the total production is very close 
to 16,800, too barrels. These include both shipments 
and that in storage at the field where the Standard 
has now tanks and reservoirs with a capacity of 
6,000,003 barrels. The Associated alone has made 
shipments approximating half a million barrels a 
month besides what it has in storage at the field. 

Among the independent companies the Peerless is 
now producing 6,300 barrels a day. It is new drill- 
ing wells No. 31 and 32, the first of which will be 
finished within another ten days and the second is 
just starting. This company completed thirteen 
wells during the year. 

The California-Kern is pushing work on its refin- 
ery on the old Grace property on 8, 29-28 The 
foundation work is now completed and material is 
being received for the stills and boilers. This is the 
seventh refinery to be located in the Kern River 
field, and others being the King, Clark, Vulcan, 
Union, Southwestern and Eastern Consolidated. 
The last named two are just approaching comple- 
tion. Besides these there is the Pacific plant west 
of Bakersfield and the Consolidated California 
Fields company's at Sunset, making a total of nine 
in K*rn county completed or in course of construc- 
tion. There are three others known to be cont- 
emplated for next year including the Standard'* 
great plant. 

The Associated has just completed a new board 
ing house for its employees on the San Joaquin 
lease and it was opened a few days ago. The office 
building is Hearing completion. The comb'ne is 
finishing many of its improvements and is believed 
to be on a dividend paying basis. Its contracts with 
many of the companies from which it leased pro- 
perty called for a very large amount of improve- 
ments and this his made necessary the expenditure 
of great sums of mjney and prevented the payment 
of Anything to stockholders. 

A. R. HINTON. 



Kern. 

A clash is reported to have occurred at Sunset on 
Saturday between the forces of the Consolidated 
California Oil Fields company and the Santa Fe 
Railroad company over the rights of way of the re- 
spective companies. Parties arriving in the city 
Saturday evening reported that on that morning the 
oil company hired a number of teams and drivers, 
paying, it is said, $5 a day in order to get men at 
once, and tore up the railroad's grading across a 
tract of forty acres north of the Alameda property. 
After doing this, a vacant house was moved onto the 
right of way and guards placed in it to keep the 
railroad company's laborers from working. This 
was the status of affairs reported when the train left 
Saturday afternoou. Particulars are difficult to ob- 
tain. Inquiry at the Consolidated California Oil 
Fields company's office in this city failed to elicit 
any information in the way of either confirmation or 
denial. Superintendent Shindler of the Santa Fe 
was in tawn today and said that he had heard that 
there was some difficulty at Sunset but had no official 
information as to details, as the work is outside of 
his jurisdiction and in that of the constru tion de- 
partment. From what can be learned, the imme- 
diate cause of the trouble is that the Consolidated 
Oil Fields company demands a right of way for its 
pipe line across the same property and is wi'ling to 
allow the Santa Fe to cross the land, which belongs 
to one of its affiliated companies, only on condition 
that it is given the same privilege. Negotiations 
were in progress to settle this question and it was 
supposed that a peaceable settlement would be 
reached, but on Saturday eame the reports of the 
actual clash on the ground. — Californian. 

News comes from the west side fields to the effect 
that the Areata, which has been drilling for the 
past six months on 31, 32-24, has at last struck an 
oil strata at a depth of about 1,750 feet. Manager 
A. W. Gilfillen is now at the field superintending 
the finishing of the work. The drill penetrated the 
oil sand a few days ago. The property of the Ar- 
eata is right on what is generally considered the 
divide between the Sunset and Midway districts, 
where many companies have worked without suc- 
cess. Mr. Gilfillen and his associates began to work 
under discouraging circumstances end have per- 
severed for months in spite of all predictions of 
failure. They have drilled to a greater depth than 
any previous operators and have apparently struck 
the ric'i strata at last. Abouttwo morths ago work 
was suspended temporarily and the predictions of 
failure were again heard, but after a short lime oper- 
ations were resumed. The success of the Areata 
proves beyond a doubt the existence of the continu- 
ous oil belt along the west side in which so many ex- 
perts have believed. But many have contended 
that there was a b eak in the strata at that point, 
extending oyer a territory of two miles, and this the 
strike of the Areata people has disproved. The new 
well is near the Vulture, which quit work at a depth 
of 1,400 feet. The closest producing wells are the 
Ducky Boy, in Western Sunset, three-fourths of a 
mile distant, and the Croesus, in Midway, one and 
one-fourth miles away. The Areata is some 300 feet 
deeper than t v e other wells that were abandoned 
in the vicinity. The Geyser, the Maj ester and the 
Oriental all quit at 1,400 feet, the Areata bei-g the 
first to show its faith in the theory that there is only 
a dip in the strata and no break. The evidence is 
accumulating that the oil belt on the west side is 
continuous from Sunset to Coalinga, each additional 
discovery bearing out this supposition. 

A. W. Gilfillen, general manager of the Areata Oil 
company at Midway, was in Bakersfield this week 
and fully confirms the reports of the striking of oil 
in the company's well on 31, 32-24 on the divide be- 
tween the Sunset and Midway districts. Mr. Gil- 
fillen says that the company has found an excellent 
oil sand and has a good quantity of light oil of ex- 
cellent quality. Drilling, however, has not been 
stopped and the work is being pushed right ahead 
with the intention of going still deeper before fin- 
ishing the work. Mr. Gilfillen is greatly encouraged 
over his success in getting oil where all others failed 
completelp. He has fully demonstrated the exist- 
ence of the continuous oil belt on the west side. — 
Californian. 

Santa Barbara, 

E. M. Sheridan, who represents the Union Oil 
company's interests in the west end of the county, 
was in Santa Barbara Monday. He came down for a 
brief visit with his family, now occupying their new 
home on East Victoria street. Mr. Sheridan, in a 
conversation with a Press representative pictured a 
very bright outlook for the oil fields in which he and 
his company are so extensively interested. The 



Union company's last well, known as. Hill No. a, 
came in last Saturday at a depth of about 2600 feet, 
and is believed to be the equal of Hill No. 1, which 
has proved a remarkable producer. It has yielded 
250 barrels a day, the full capacity of the pump in 
use, and the supply constantly increasing until a 
week or two ago it commenced flowing over the top 
of the casing. It is believed it will yield at least 350 
barrels when a larger pump is put in. The oil is 
heavily charged with gas, which has been piped 
down the canyon and is used for lighting all the 
company's plants besides supplying fuel for running 
the engiues and pumps. With the Purisima well, 
which came in two weeks ago, the company has 
three big producers in that locality. The wells are 
situated about five miles north of the town of Dom- 
poc. The oil runs above 20 gravity and brings 85 
cents per barrel in the open market, with a prospect 
of going much higher, as the demand for light grav- 
ity oil is growing. The bringing in of three wells 
has proven a large territory to be rich in oil, and Mr' 
Sheridan, with many other experts, believes that it 
is destined to become the richest field in the state, 
if not in the United States. The anticline is well de- 
fined for a distance of twenty miles and adjacent to 
it the Union company alone has 70,000 acres and as 
much more is held by other concerns. 

E. A. Edwards, an oil man of Dos Angeles has 
been in Santa Barbara looking after some claims that 
he has between Mussel Rock and Point Sal. Mr. Ed- 
wards is an experienced oil man, having had ex- 
perience in some of the great oil fields of the east as 
well as in California. When asked his opinion of the 
oil fields of northern Santa Barbara county, he said 
he thought it would soon be the greatest in the 
state. The oil that has come from this field so far is 
capable of being refined, while much of the oil. from 
other fields aside from Coalinga, is fit only for fuel 
and contains practically no kerosene. Then in the 
matter of transportation the cost is less from this 
field than from interior fields. As to the amount of 
oil, the field has just begun to be developed. 

San Mateo. 

The high gravity is now down about 1,500 feet 
with the best of prospects of striking a flowing well. 
The first oil indications were struck at about 300 
feet, then again at 700 feet but from there until the 
1,400 foot level was reached there were no other in- 
dication of oil. Since then, however, the prospects 
bavo been exceedingly good and growing better 
each day. They are drilling with a full hole of 
water, but oil in large quantities constantly comes to 
the surface. The well has a pressure of 750 pounds 
to the square inch and a gcod flow is looked for at 
any time. 

Santa Maria. 

With every tank filled and five cars loaded with 
oil ready for shipment, the Pinal company has been 
obliged to shut its wells down until such time when 
the Port Harford tank can be completed in about a 
week, which will then enable the c;mpany to pro- 
ceed. Wells No. 1 and 4 are completed and produce 
excellently. Wells No. 2 and 3 are being deepened. 

The Union Oil company has penetrated the first 
strata of oil in its second well, finding a high grade 
article. The company, however, will continue drill- 
ing. Work on the Union company's pipeline from 
Harris Station to the tank continues uninterrupted. 

The Graciosa company on the Harris ranch is 
down 2,800 feet with good indications. The com- 
pany struck the first strata of oil some time ago. 
Gas ond seepages are in evidence. 

The Biookshire company continues on its second 
well and down more than 1, 500 feet. The indications 
are excellent and the stockholders will soon find 
their stock going up in value. 

The California Coast company resumed drilling 
this week and is down 800 feet. 

G. W. Muscio is contemplating leasing his land to 
an oil company. Mr. Muscio has fine territory be- 
ing adjacent to all the producing lands. 

Sunset. 

The most important event in the west side fields in 
many months is the striking of oil by the Areata on 
31, 32-34 at a depth of 1,750 feet. This is exactly on ■ 
what was sometimes called the divide between Sun- 
set and Midway districts Other companies drilled 
here to a depth of about 1,400 feet, the depth of most 
of the wells in Sunset and Midway and the point at 
which the oil strata underlying the two fields is gen- 
erally found, and failed to get oil. Some oil men 
profess to believe that there was a break in the strata 
at this point, while others held to the view that there 
was only a dip and that by drilling to a greater depth 
oil would be struck at this point as at the others. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



The Vulture, the Majestic, the Occidental ami the 
Geyser are the nearest to the new wells and all of 
tbe.se ceased operations at about 1,400 feet. The 
Areata managers, however to test the continuous 
belt theory thoroughly. They continued operations 
in spite of all discouragements and a few days ago a 
good flow of oil was struck. The company is con- 
tinuing work and will sink the well to a .still greater 
depth before 6nishing it with b view to getting the 
best that is to be had. The nearest producing wells 
are the Lucky Boy in Sunset and the Croeana in 
Midway, both about a mile away. 

The outlook is for an early completion of the ex- 
tension of the Sunset road through the field for the 
two and one-half miles which it has planned to 
cover. The grading is completed, and the laying of 
steel is to commence at once. Some delay is being 
cansed by a dispute with the Consolidated Califor- 
nia Oil Fields company over the right-of-way acros' 
some forty acres lying north of the Alameda, where 
the oil company recently tore up the grading and 
stopped work pending negotiations as to dela'ls. 
This, however, will not stop the completion tf work 
on the extension and there is an extensive revival of 
business in anticipation of much needed transporta- 
tion facilities. 

In the Midway district the pipe line of the Con- 
solidated California Oil cempany will give the oper- 
ators an outlet for the first time and in consequence 
many of the companies are preparing to undertake 
larger operations than ever before. 

The absence of transportation facilities has kept 
the shipments from these two districts during 1902 
down to about 300,000 barrels, all of which came 
from Sunset. Besides this there is some oil in 
storage and the district is capable of producing 
many times this amount if an outlet could be 
found, hence the figures are no indications of the 
great possibilities of these districts. 
Wyoming. 

The Bettys Oil & Development Co., are building a 
new derrick on Sec. 24-14-120. Our statement in last 
week's paper that they were soon to erect one on Sec. 
14-14-120, was not correct. 

The Mount Pleasant Oil company, which will have 
its headquarters at Evanston and its field of opera- 
tions will be Uinta county has filed arlicles of incor- 
poration. It will have a capital stock of $250,000 and 
the incorporators are all eastern men. The trustees 
for the first year are Charles J. Myers, Lewis N. 
Marsh, Arthur N. Ward, David Rodman, Francis H. 
Dodds, Herbert A. Sanford and Fred Russell. The 
company own some choice territory in the Dinta 
county oil fields and will begin operations in the 
early spring. 

The Standard-Reserve Oil Co., last Saturday re- 
ceived a fine piece of machinery in the form of a 
steam hoist which has been placed on their ground 
on Sec. 12-15-118, where a coal claim has recently 
been opened up, and where the company are sinking 
their first oil well. With plenty of coal and water at 
hand, this company is prepared to carry on drilling 
operations throughout the winter. They are meet- 
ing with great encouragement, having had several 
showings of cil and expect to bring in a producer 
soon. 

Surveyor J. M. Shirk was in town Monday from 
Piedmont on business. Speaking of the oil field, 
said he was more favorably impressed with the out- 
look at present than any time since the opening of 
this territory for petroleum. The companies who 
have carried on development work during the sum- 
mer are not saying much about what they have 
accomplished, but the vast amount of capital that 
has been expended and the number of wells put 
down speaks out too plain to allow of any doubt as to 
the Uinta county field being one of the greatest and 
richest yet discovered. Next season will be one of 
great activity and nothing can prevent this field from 
eventually leading the world in the matter of high- 
grade oil, 

A marriage license was issued yesterday to George 
Washington Short and Miss Ida Viola Clark, both of 
Fossil. The bride was formerly postmaster at Fossil, 
while the groom is a prominent oil man in that 
vicinity. 

J. H. Lobell, American director of the Belgo- 
American drilling trust, has announced that the 
Belgo-American company has bought out the Penn- 
sylvania Oil company, at Casper, Wyoming. The 
price, while not made public, is stated to be $800,000. 
The property includes 13 flowing wells, the big refin- 
ery at Casprr, and several thousand acres of oil lands. 
A p ; pe line is to be built connecting the wells with 
the refinery at Casper. The Belgo-American com- 
pany last spring bought out the Henderson wells, 
near Lander, Wyo., for $500,000, and is preparing to 
build a railroad to thai point from Caspar. 



Recent Patents. 

The following recently granted patents of interest 

to the oil trade arc reported expressly for the I'aci- 

II RKPORTBRby J. M. Neablt, Patent Att.n 

ney, Park Building, Pittsburg, Pa., from whom 

printed copies may be procured for 1 .scents each: 

Deep-well pump, II. A. Broon, Fiudlay, O.; No. 
7.11,880. 

Deep-well pump, C. L. Parker, Los Angeles, Cal.; 
No. 741,926. 

Well-pipe jack, I. C. Beard and J. II. Stephens, 
Stroud, Okla.; No, 742,111. 

Attaching tools to walking beams, L. A. Hard!- 
sod, Santa Paula, Cal.; 743,639. 

Well rod extractor, W. W. French, Vanderbilt, 
Mich.; No. 743,854- 

Process of desulphurizing sulphur-bearing pe- 
troleum, T. F. Colin, Elizabeth, N. J.; No. 744,721., 

Boring tube or rod for boring apparatus, Alex 
McNamara and John Schanke, Johannesburg Trans- 
val; No. 744,873- 

Rope cutter, T. C. Rogers, Sistersville, W. Va., 
assignor to Car er Oil company, same place; No. 
745.i»6- 

Well screen, G. J, Karsch, Rockisland, Texas, No. 
746,096 

Wall packer for oil wells, Samuel Smith and Wil- 
liam Wright, Franklin, Pa ; No. 746,184. 



The Difference. 



If an editor makes a mistake he has to 
apologize for it, but if a doctor makes one he 
buries it. If the editor makes one there is 
a lawsuit, swearing and the smell of sulphur, 
but if the doctor makes one there Is a fune- 
ral, cut flowers and a smell of varnish. The 
doctor can use a word a yard long without 
knowing what it means, but if the editor 
uses it he has to spell it. If the doctor goes 
to see another man's wife he charges for the 
visit, but if the editor goes to see another 
man's wife he receives a charge of buckshot. 
Any old medical college can make a doctor. 
You can't make an editor. He has to be 
born. When a doctor gets drunk it's a case 
of "overcome by heat "and if he dies it is 
heart trouble. When an editor gets drunk 
it's a case of too much booze, and if he dies 
it's a case of delirium tremens. — Ex. 

Continued from Page Six. 



it will begin as soon as the present tank 
builders have finished their work for the 
railroad. 

The Mercantile Crude Oil company's new 
well is now flowing at a good rate, producing 
over 200 barrels per day. At first this well 
had to be pumped, but it was finally put to 
flowing and resulted mest satisfactorily. 

After cleaning out its well, the Pleasant 
Valley Stock company tried to replace the 
tubing, but the well became so active that 
only a few hundred feet could be put in. 
The oil is now flowing through the casing at 
■ the rate of 500 barrels per day, or more. 
This company is over 1,000 feet with its sec- 
ond well, and has the lumber and casing on 
the ground for No. 3. 

The Associated Oil company has erected a 
rig on section 24-21-15, southeast of town, 



and are now advertising for bids for drilling 
the first well. 

The St. Paul-Fresno Oil company has 
levied an assessment oft 1 ,' cents per share 
upon the subscribed stock of the company. 
For the past year the company has not been 
doing any work, but the present assessment 
would seem to indicate the drilling of an- 
other well iu the near future. 

The Union Oil company has removed most 
of its new rig on section 24 to section 13, 
where a rig for No. 4 is under way. Number 
3 is down 900 feet. 

The Wabash Oil company will be ready by 
next week to spud in on No. 2. 

Corey & Canfuld struck the first sand last 
week. Just how valuable it is has not been 
determined. They are still drilling. 

R. C. Baker's second well on the St. Paul 
lease has penetrated over sixty feet of oil 
sand and they are going deeper with it. 

Manager D. M. De Long, of the M. K. & 
T., has taken an option on the N. ^ of N. y 2 
of section 8-20-15 from J. R. Baird. Mr. De 
Long and some other gentlemen have pur- 
chased the Perry Phillips tract in the north- 
east quarter of section 30-20-15. 

Number 1 of the New S. F. Crude sud- 
denly broke loose this week and is now flow- 
ing over the casing. A packer will be put 
in to see if it may not flow steadily like No. 
2, which has been producing 250 barrels per 
day for the past three months. 

We learn from the supervisors that a new 
county road will be built between the town- 
ship lines of 20-14 and 21-15, giving a direct 
road from the west side field into the town. 
At present there is absolutely no decent 
road from the oil field into town, and such 
effort on the part of the supervisors is com- 
mendable and will be appreciated. 

Owing to the entire loss by fire of all the 
contents of the " Coalinga Oil News " office, 
the paper has been discontinued. Mr. Geo. 
Ehle, the proprietor, did splendid work for 
the Coalinga field through his paper, and his 
loss in consequence will be a loss to the in- 
terests of the field. 

The Southern Pacific company is now at 
work extending a pipe line from section 7 
up through section 6, and into section 31 as 
far as the McClung & Claypool lease. On 
section 7, the prospective location of the 
pumping plant, the tank builders are at work 
on a 10,000 barrel tank. Within another 
week, it is reported, work on the large res- 
ervoir wiil commence. 



The subscription price of the Pacific Oil 
Reorter is $2.50 per year. 




BATES' 

PATENT CASING TONGS 



1416-1436 19th St., Bakersficld, Cal. 



Fills a long-felt want. No more need of 
pole and rope for screwing up casing. Bates 
Tongs can be applied to the casing anywhere 
in driving or pulling without danger of injury 
or parting casing. 

Set No. r, with any two size jaws from o54 
to 13^ inches. 

Set No. 2, with any two size jaws from 4 to 
9f6 inches. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



Private Rooms 



Phone Main 5966 



Jules Wittmann 



Jules' Restaurant 



Regular Dinner with wine, 75c. 
Sundays and Holidays, $1.00. 



315-317-319=321-323 
Pine St,. S. F. 



Open Evenings 
Music Sundays 



;sa33 oil ca TV? $.-•:. " :-i ;•<-; 




FOR SALE 



IN 

KERN RIVER, Cheap 

Section 2, 29=28. 

Shaded portion map shows 40 acres three-fourths mile east of 
DISCOVERY WELL. U. S. Patent 22 years. EASY TERMS. 
Cheapest in Kern River. Write at once. 

WESTERN R. 1, CO., 

Room 36 Chronicle BIdg., 

San Francisco. 



MM 

Santa Fe 

mm 



ALL THE WAY 

CHICAGO 
In 3 Days 



Trains leave Union Ferry Depot, San Fran- 
cisco, as follows: 

A. M.— *BAKERSFIEI,D I.OCAX,; Due 
Stockton 10:40 a. m., Fresno 2:40 p. m., 
Bakersfield 7:15 p. m, Stops at all points 
in San Joaquin Valley. Corresponding 
train arrives 8:55 a. m, 

MH"THE CALIFORNIA LIMIT- 
ED;" Due Stockton 12:01 p. m., Fresno 
3:20 p. m., Bakersfield 6:00 p. m., Kansas 
City 3rd day 2:35 a. m,, Chicago 3rd day 
2:15 p. m. Palace Sleepers and Dining 
Car through to Chicago. No second class 
tickets honored on this train. Corres- 
ponding train arrives °n:io p. m. 
A. M.— *VAIABY LIMITED; Due 
Stockton 12:01 p. m„ Fresno 3:20 p. m< 
Bakersfield 6:00 p. m. The fastest train 
in the Valley. Carries Composite and 
Reclining Chair Car. No second class 
tickets honored on this train. Corres- 
ponding train arrives 11:10 p. m. 
4aa P. M.— * STOCKTON LOCAL; Due 
Mill Stockton 7:10 p. m. Corresponding train 
tVV arrives 11:10 a. m. 

P. M,— *OVERLAND EXPRESS ; Due 
Stockton 11:15 p. m., Fresno 3:15 a. m. 
Bakersfield 7:35 a. m , Kansas City 4th 
day 7:00 a. m., Chicago 4th day 8:47 p. m. 
Palace and Tourist Sleepers and free Re- 
clining Chair Cars through to Chicago. 
Also Palace Sleeper which cuts out at 
Fresno. Corresponding train arrives 
6:25 p. m. 

§ Mondays and Thursdays 
Tuesdays and Fridays. 
Personally Conducted Parties for Kansas 
City, Chicago and East leave on Overland Express 
Monday, Thursday and Saturday at 8:00 p. m. 
Ticket Offices, 641 Market Street and in Ferry 
Depot, San Francisco ; and 1x12 Broadway 
Oakland. 



7:30 
9:30 

9:30 



8:00 



♦Daily 



WANTED 



A man who will advance cash 
to put down one deep oil well on 
fifty acres of proven land, with 
two wells now pumping 30 grav- 
ity oil. Tools, engines boilers and 
casing on the property free from 
debts ; land patented. Will give 
a large interest in the property 
for the money advanced. 

Apply to 

A. D. EL WELL, 

605 Grant Bldg. 
Los Angc.es, Calif. 



TO THE EAST 



SUNSET ROUTE 

Means a Trip Taken 

IN COMFORT 

Oiled Track==No Dust 
Oil=Burning Engines 
No Cinders 
No Frost==No Snow 

SUNSET LIMITED 

San Francisco to New Orleans 

EYEBY DAY 

Dining car, meals a la carte 

Observation Car 

Vestibuled Pullman Sleepers 
Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, 

El Paso, San Antonio, 

Houston, Beaumont and 

Texas Oil Fields. 



Southern Pacific 



Wyoming Oil Companies 

We can furnish you nice folders 
with the map of Uinta county oi 
fields on one side, and on the 
other whatever advertising matter 
you may desire. 

We have half-tone cuts of the 
field which can be used in the 
folder free of charge. On the 
map your property will be shown 
in colors. 

Price per thousand $40. When 
a large number are desired a sub- 
stantial reduction per thousand 
is made. 

Orders filled promptly, 
Pacific On, Reporter, 
318 Pine street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



J. 8. EWEN 

STOCKBROKER 

318 PINE STREET, Room 5 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Member California Stock and Oil Ex- 
change, and San Francisco and Tonopah 
Mining Fxchange. 

Tei/Ephone Main 1552. 



Companies Incorporated 

under the lienient laws of 

ARIZONA 

which has the broadest laws of any state. 
Companies can be organized to do busiuess any 
where No personal liability. No limit on capi 
talization. No State examination of books. No 
franchise tax. Stock can be made non-assessable 
and can be issued for services. 

Write for information and blanks to 
HUGH M. CREIGHTON & CO. 
Phoenix, Arizona. 



THE NATIONAL SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

Oil Well Supplies 
Drilling and 
Fishing Tools 

Fitter CablesHbest in the world 

We carry in stock heavy 7^-in., 5^6-in. and 
4j4-in. Boston Casing, in addition to all the 
standard sizes and weights. 6-in., 8-in. and 
10-ln. Boston Drive Pipe always on hand. 

Pacific Coast Headquarters 

117 North Main Street 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Branches: 

Bakersfield and McKittrick, al. 



•THE- 



Large Dome, Two Sheet 
Boiler 



SAVES MONEY 



Consumes Less Fuel than any other. 

Dry Steam always assured. 

Fitted for 



Oil Well or Stationary Work I 



Write for Prices 



R. H. BERRON CO. 

509 Mission Street, Sao Francisco, Cal. 







PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



to 9\ 

| ANNOUNCEMENT I 

I 1 

to » 

to On January first, 1904, the PACIFIC OIL REPORTER * 

to "* 

jjj will issue a Special New Year's Edition, covering the Jjj 

to 't* 

to progress made in all of the California oil fields during m 

to the year 1903, and the outlook for the coming year, jjj 

Jjj together with reliable figures on the output, etc. !}! 

to This edition will be superbly illustrated and will if 

to * 

ijj contain articles by those most prominent in the oil JJJ 

jjj industry. From 25,000 to 30,000 copies will be circu= *f\ 

to W 

to lated. Secure your advertising space at once, as it is W 

to W 

\j> already being rapidly taken. JJJ 

to * 

to * 

to * 

™, J*\ 



_JA 

California Stock and Oil 
Exchange. 

The following were the stock sales in 
the California Stock and Oil Exchange 
in the formal sessions held for the week 
ending Wednesday, December 16th. 

ASSOCIATED OIL CO. 

1,000 at 19 $1, 900 00 

CLAIRMONT. 

600 at 30 1 So 00 

FULTON. 

50 at 450 22500 

HOME OIL. 

ISO at 100 15000 

500 at I 05 525 00 

100 at laj'/z. 10750 

INDEPENDENCE. 

100 at 16 16 00 

HANFORD. 

2 at 143 00 286 00 

1 at 145 00 14500 

JUNCTION. 

1,000 at 18 18 J 00 

300 at 19 57oo 

LION. 

625 at 02 1200 

MONARCH. 

100 at 42 4200 

iooat 43 43 00 

400 at 45 180 00 

MONTE CRISTO. 

1,000 at 60 60000 

100 at 63 6300 

OCCIDENTAL OIL. 

1, 100 at I? 18700 

OIL CITY PETROLEUM. 

1,000 at 26 26000 

PEERLESS. 

30 at 13 75 41200 

PITTSBURG OIL. 

500 at 15 75 00 

REED CRUDE (New Issue.) 

100 at 450 45000 

S. F. & MCKITTRICK OIL. 

120 at 300 36000 

SOVEREIGN. 
800 at 38 304 00 



PACIFIC OIL, REPORTER 



.42 



■ 19 



1 *5 
.60 

.17 

2j 
1-50 



Four 67 

Fulton 

Giant 

Hanford 141.00 

Home . .. .95 

Independence 

Junction 18 

Kern 

Kern River 10.00 

Lion 

Monarch of Arizona ... .41 

Maricopa 

McKittrick 

Monte Crista 

Nevada .30 

Occidental of West Va 16 

Oil City Petroleum 24 

Peerless 

Petroleum Center 

Pittsburg 18 

Reed Crude 

Reed Crude, New Issue 

S. F. & McKittrick ... . 3.00 
San Joaquin O. & D.. .. 4.00 

Section Seven . 

Senator 63 

Shamrock 

Sovereign 37 

Sterling 2.55 

Sunset (Or ) 

Superior 05 

Teck 

Thirty-three 

Toltec 18 

Twenty-eight 4.25 

Union 

United Petroleum 

West Shore 

Western Petroleum 

Wolverine 



1.40 
•45 



Stock Quotations. 

Following are the latest quotations for 
stocks of oil companies listed on the Cal- 
ifornia Stock and Oil Exchange : 

Oil Stocks, Bid. Asked. 

Alma 

Apollo 

Asso. Oil Co Stk. Tr. 

Certificates 

Aztec 

Bay City 

Bear Flag 

California Standard . . 

Caribou 

Central Point Con 

Chicago Crude •• 

Clairemont 

Esperanza 

Fauna ., 



■ S.'A 



.12 
1-25 



•19 

•30 



.70 

45 



14 00 

1.02 j4 

.16 

.19 

5 00 



02 
43 
.10 
20 
65 



18 



14 



4-50 



■25 

.40 

2.60 

.20 

.07 

1. 10 

.20 

4.60 



3.10 



UNION 
PACIFIC 

Suggests 

Speed 
and 
Comfort 

S. F. Booth, Gen. Agent. 

I Montgomery St., 8. F. 

Phone, Exchange 300. 



W. A. BROPHY, 

914 mutual Savings Bank Bldg., 

708 Market St., San Francisco. 
Telephone, Green 816. 

Petroleum Lands Examined and Re- 
ported on in all Parts of the United 
States. California a Specialty. 



Stock, Bond and Investment Syndicate 

(Incorporated) 
Money Loaned on Stocks. 

Listed and Unlisted Oil and Mining Stocks 
R. I,. CHENBV, Secretary 
514-515 Examiner Building 

San Francisco, California 



Notice of Assessment. 



HIGH GRAVITY OIL COMPANY; 
Principal place of business, city and 
county of San Francisco, State of Cali- 
fornia. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meet- 
ing of the Board of Directors of the 
High Gravity Oil Company held on the 
18th day of November A. D. 1903, an 
areqs rad sinao (01) ua} jo jnarussasse 
was levied upon the capital slock of the 
corporation, payable immediately to the 
Secretary of the corporation at its office 
No. 423 Market street, in the city and 
county of San Francisco, State of 
California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment 
shall remain unpaid on the 23rd day of 
December, 1903, will be delinquent and 
advertised for sale at public auction and 
unless payment is made before, will be 
sold on Wednesday the 13th day of 
January A. D. 1904, to pay the delinquent 
assessment, together with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors. 
D. ROSENBLUM, Secretary. 
Location of office No. 433 Market 
street, city of San Francisco, State of 
California. 



AMERICAN CONSOLIDATED 
Oil Company 

A. B. Butler, J. A. Chanslop, 

President Vice President 



13.750 shares of stock for sale at 
8 cents per share — par. value $1.00 

P. W. SPAULDING 

ATTORN EY-AT-LAW 

Evanston - Wyoming 

613 Market St., San Francisco. 



Have You Securities 

that pay no dividends and you want 
some that do? If you want to buy, sell 
or exchange investment stocks, or if you 
want gilt-edge shares in operating com- 
panies, address the Debenture Surety 
Company, Rialto Bldg., San Francisco, 
which also incorporates, finances and 
operates good enterprises. 



HALF MOON BAY 

THE ONLY DISCOVERY OF ITS KIND IN THE 

STATE OF CALIFORNIA 



The recent strike in the Half Moon Bay oil field, on the Fountain Oil Company's lease is recognized as the most important of 
late discoveries in the State. 

52 gravity oil ; paraffine base. 

In its leading editorial in the issue of December 7th, the "San Francisco Chronicle" says: "The opening of a gusher oil well 
on the ridge overlooking Half Moen Bay brings the productive oil belt of the State materially further north and places San Mateo in 
the list of petroleum-producing counties. The discovery is a noteworthy one ; its measeres give promise of permanent productivity." 

The operating companies in the immediate neighborhood of this Company are: 

The Fountain Oil Company, upon whose lease the strike was made. No treasury stock in this company has been offered for 
sale in the last two years. We have made arrangements by which we can offer a very small amount of this stock for sale, for 
limited time, at $r.oo per share. 

The Wisconsin Gold Bond Oil Company has a well down nearly 1600 feet, which has produced thousands of dollars worth of 
oil and is still going deeper. This stock is now selling at 50 cents and will undoubtedly be at a much higher figure in the near 
future. For blocks of this stock at this price, write or wire us immediately. 

The American Duchess Oil Company not only holds a large acreage in the best productive portion of this field, but controls 
an interest in other very valuable properties. For shares or information address us. Stocr now selling at 50 cents. 

A new company, now organizing, has secured extensive properties in this field, including a well now drilling within 400 feet 
of the gusher: All of these stocks purchased through us are protected by our Trust Fund Agreement. For information address, 



DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY, 

Rialto Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 5. No. 8. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., SATURDAY, DECEMBER 26. igo3. 



Pricb, Ten Crnts. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Publl.h.d W..klr 
Tb« Ofl Authority of the Padlc Caul. 
By C*lltorala P.trol.o— Ml».r.' Association 



MRS. MARIA ROSA WINN, Proprietor. 

IS. S. EASTMAN, 

Editor and Business Manager 

OrrrcB *bd Bditoiiil Room* 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco, California 

Telephone. Bush 176. 

TERMS 
OlfB Yaaa St 50 

flX MOKTHS I 50 

t^«b« Momrvj 1 00 

Si vols Copies. 10c 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 

Monit should be sent by Postal Order. Draft >r Registered 
Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil Reporter, 318 Pine street. San 
Francisco, rooms it-J*-13 Communications must be accomoanied 
by writer's name and address, not necessarily for publication, 
bat as ■ guarantee of good faith. 

Entered in the Postofflce at San Francisco , California, is sec. 
ond class matter. 

THE GOVERNMENT AFTER THE 
L4ND SHARKS. 



The arrest of John A. Benson of this city 
in Washington the other day was the logi- 
cal and inevitable result of the recent in- 
vestigations by the government into the 
operations of Benson and his associates and 
others of his ilk in this state of late years. 

This is not the first time that Benson has 
been placed under arrest by the government 
for crooked work in the land department. 
Benson was at one time a government 
contract surveyor. He took large contracts 
for surveying public lands, but his work was 
so rotten and crooked that he was indicted 
on sixteen counts and arrested. He ob- 
tained bail and pending his trial skipped 
the country, but returned after a few years' 
sojourn in Europe and was brought to trial 
but secured his release on account of some 
defects in the indictments. 

Since then Benson and his associates, 
some of whom are prominent men in this 
state, have been quietly working their 
schemes to secure valuable government lands 
through the medium of the timber and stone 
and forest reserve acts. Benson has an in- 
timate knowledge of the public lands on the 
coast and has also managed to obtain favors 
from the department officials at Washington 
bribing clerks in the land office. It is for 
this offense that he has just been arrested. 
By this means he was given inside 
information that enabled him and his 
associates to profit at the expense of the 
government in the operation of the land de- 
partment, especially with reference to the 
forest reserve lands. Benson would obtain 
advance information that certain lands were 
to be condemned as forest reserve and he 
would at once secure the lands at a nominal 
price if they had been taken up or place 
timber and stone filings on them if they 
were vacant, and then secure scrip for them 
when they were condemned as forest re- 
serve. This scrip they would then file on 
the most valuable lands known to them, 
thereby securing oftentimes lands worth 
many times the value of the lands 
surrendered for the scrip. In many cases 



the scrip was filed on valuable oil and min- 
eral lands, thus securing a great advantage 
over mineral locators. In some cases this 
scrip was filed on valuable oil lands over 
mineral locators and the original locators 
either forced to compromise with these 
sharks or be forced Into long and expensive 
contests. 

This scrip also afforded these land sharks 
a means of levying a sort of blackmail on in- 
nocent people. We know of a case where a 
tract of land was being drilled on for oil by 
the legal occupants under the mineral laws 
and some of these sharks came along with 
their forest reserve scrip obtained as above 
mentioned and filed it on the land being de- 
developed and the threat made that unless 
they were given an interest in the land 
they would Institute a contest and defeat 
the locators. Of course this was only a 
method of blackmail, but it worked and they 
were given an interest in the land by the 
rightful claimants. 

It is believed and hoped that the arrest of 
Benson will put a stop to much of this high- 
handed stealing, and at the same time point 
out the weak spots in our public land laws 
that may lead to either a repeal of the tim- 
ber and stone act or a modification that will 
make it impossible for land sharks to operate 
as Benson and others have been doing. The 
forest reserve act also will doubtless be 
modified so as to shut off the railroads and 
the big corporations and land agents from 
the operations they have been working so 
successfully of late. 

The officials of the land department de- 
serve great credit for their success in run- 
ning to cover the gang of sharks who have 
operated in this state of late years. Several 
people of prominence and high standing are 
in dread of the disclosures that are liable to 
be made when the government detectives 
get through with their investigations. Let 
the good work go on. 



WHAT KIND OF OIL. 



"What kind of oil are your wells produc- 
ing?" is a question that is often asked pro- 
ducers, who, in most instances, are obliged to 
answer that they don't know. Some will tell 
you they are producing a certain gravity of 
oil but cannot say what percentage of any 
kind of product it will yield. Concerning 
any other interests they are able to speak 
more frankly. If they possess a timber tract 
they measure its value by the kinds of tim- 
ber as veil as the quantity, instead of ex- 
pecting one price for it all under the head of 
lumber. If they have agricultural Interests 
they do not sell their wheat, rye, corn, oats 
and buckwheat all at the same price just be- 
cause it may be all classed under the head 
of grain. It is the same as to other activities 
with which they are identified, with the ex- 
ception of their oil producing interests. 
When it comes to these it is found that they 
know very little about the products of their 
wells. These products may come from 
different formations and vary much In char- 
acter, but to the producer of the class re- 
ferred to they constitute simply oil, to be 
turned over to the nearest pipe line at tho 



price prevailing for that region. It is singu- 
lar indeed, how many men, shrewd and keen 
enough in other lines, have been negligent 
in this. Not all producers, of course, are to 
be so classed, but many of them are, and If 
this should meet the eye of any of them 
they may thank the Oil Reporter for 
having suggested that with the resolutions 
they may put into effect with the beginning 
of the new year they might profitably in- 
clude one relating to this subject. 



ASSESSMENT WORK. 



This is the time of year when the mineral 
locator is bestirring himself to do his 
" assessment work." This reminds us of the 
fact that the assessment work requirement 
of our public land laws is something of a 
farce, and it is not to be wondered at that 
locators view it in this light. Especially is 
this the case in its application to oil claims. 
It opens the way in all cases to a contemt- 
uous regard for the law and affords the man 
who is seeking to evade the law an oppor- 
tunity to do so under a pretense of comply- 
ing with it. Just why a 20-foot skeleton 
derrick, or a few furrows turned over, under 
the pretense of building a wagon road, 
should give a man a legal right to cover up a 
quarter section of government land a whole 
year for the purpose of speculation, is a legal 
requirement that does not commend itself to 
the average right-thinking man, even it be 
true (which we do not concede) that it is a 
requirement that will stand a legal test In 
the application of the public land laws to oil 
claims. 

In many districts in this state, notably in 
the Carissa and Cuyama, there will be hun- 
dreds of oil claims on which no assessment 
work will be done this year, the claimants 
recognizing the foolishness, if not the futil- 
ity, of trying to hold oil lands by the assess- 
ment work method. Oil men are coming to re- 
alize that the only sure and safe way to acquire 
government oil lands is by the drill and cable 
method, and the public is also learning to be 
wary of the speculator who claims to own 
thousands of acres of government oil lands 
under the assessment method. 



ASPHALT TRUST SUIT. 



The stockholders of the Asphalt Company 
of America, Insolvent, have been informed 
that the receiver may levy an assessment on 
them of $24,000,000 for their unpaid liability 
of 83 per cent of their capital stock. This is 
the largest levy of the kind ever made pos- 
sible by a similar court procedure. The or- 
der for assessment was made by Judge Kirk- 
patrick. sitting in the federal court of New- 
ark, N. J. Other than the National Asphalt 
company, there are a dozen stockholders im- 
plicated who may be sued separately. In 
addition to the $24,000,000 the receiver ex- 
pects to realize about 2,600,000 through suits 
against the several promoters of the trust on 
account of alleged peculiar stock manipu- 
lations. It looks as if the day for the con- 
sciousless promoter was about at an end. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



000<K>0(»<>OO<><K>0<K>O0<»0<>O0<KKK>0<XK><K)«0<K)<)00(>0<KK^ 

Crude Oil in Road Making. 

8 A Brief History of the Industry in California—By M. | 
I M. Bowman. § 

OOOOOO 0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000900 

The use of crude oil in road making is one 
of the unique industries for which Califor- 
nia is noted. To the casual observers of a 
few years ago the very idea of associating 
oil with road making seemed a strange, in- 
congruous notion. And, indeed, while even 
now the majority of people are entirely un- 
aware of its use, or consider it still in the 
light of an experiment, road oiling is going 
on in nearly every county in this state. 
The history of its discovery is an interesting 
one and is briefly as follows: 

Several years ago, before the railroad was 
built to the oil fields, an oil wagon broke 
down, spilling the entire contents of its tank 
upon the ground. The thick, tarry fluid 
ran for some distance down the dusty road, 
causing considerable annoyance to the team- 
sters, but in the course of a few days the 
many hundred wheels of the oil wagons 
passing over the spot had ground the oil 
into the dust and the accident was for the 
time forgotten. In the winter, however, 
when the rains had made the road well-nigh 
impassable, it was observed that this parti- 
cular spot remained smooth and hard, and in 
the following summer, when the curse of 
dust followed the curse of mud, everyone 
was surprised to find that here no dust ap- 
peared. The accident had proven a bless- 
ing in disguise. The secret revealed, the 
progressive Yankee was not long in respond- 
ing to its suggestion. Foreseeing the possi- 
bilities for the use of oil on a large scale, the 
first application obtained a patent. 

The efficiency of oil in making roads de- 
pends upon its property of cementing the 
fine particles of dust or sand into a smooth, 
hard roadbed. In doing this, it serves two 
purposes- -the prevention of dust in sum- 
mer and of mud in the rainy season. It has 
always been a problem to obtain some ma- 
terial which would fulfill these require- 
ments and stand the wear of constant travel. 
Wood, macadam, cement, brick, stone and 
asphaltum have been tried with varying de- 
grees of success. Wood, placed with its 
grain perpendicular to the surface and pre- 
serveed in tar or oil, proved expensive and 
short-lived, besides having the disadvantage 
of wearing unevenly. No macadam or ce- 
ment could be made to wear long enough to 
merit its expense, and its use was objection- 
able also on account of the dust and mud it 
produced. Brick and stone, the most ex- 
pensive materials, wear the longest, but 
they also wear unevenly and have the 
further disadvantage of being too hard for 
both horses and vehicles. The introduction 
of asphaltum seemed to have, in a measure, 
so'ved the problem; a fact that is borne out 
by its present extensive use in street work. 
It gives the desired clean streets, wears 
fairly evenly, and infinitely reduces the 
wear upon vehicles and horses, besides en- 
hancing greatly the pleasure of driving. 

But the application of asphaltum is an ex- 
tremely expensive process. To begin with, 
it is a semi-solid mixture of the pure sub- 
stance with sand, which can be handled only 
with difficulty. After being hauled to the 



place of application it must be heated and 
pressed with hot hand rollers Into the de- 
sired thickness and smoothness. The use of 
the natural oil, on the other hand, as it 
comes from the wells in the fluid form, pro- 
duces the same kind of road at a much lower 
cost. The former is a mechanical mixture 
of aspheltum with sand, the latter a mixture 
of the whole oil, including the asphaltum 
with the natural earth as it occurs in the 
roadway. The difference in cost in putting 
on the natural oil is due to, first, the ease of 
transportation of the fluid as compared to 
solid asphaltum, and, second, the simplicity 
of application. 

The methods of applying oil to roads are, 
in general, extremely simple. A grade of 
oil, which contains the highest per cent of 
asphaltum obtainable, is selected. This oil 
is now obtained in the Bakersfield district 
and contains from 17 per cent to 40 per cent 
of the base. It is pumped into tank cars of 
about 12,000 gallons capacity, and shipped to 
nearest point on railroad. It is then either 
pumped or run by gravity into wagon tanks 
of some thirty barrels capacity and thence 
distributed by means of a simple machine 
which is attached to the bick of the wagon. 
If a pump is used in conveying the oil from 
the cars to the wagons, it is an easy matter 
to heat the oil by steam from the pumping 
plant, and this is essential, both to thin it 
sufficiently to run freely through the ma- 
chine and to cause a thorough penetration 
of the roadbed. 

Numerous devices have been employed 
for distributing the oil, from the common 
"sprinkler" such as is used on water wagons, 
to combined machines which sift sand upon 
the oil as it is run out. The machine al- 
most exclusively employed, however, Is that 
known as the DeCamp machine. In this 
machine drills and harrows are attached to 
catch and cover the oil which issues through 
twenty-four short pipes inserted in the bot- 
tom of a small reservoir, which is fed by a 
large pipe from the wagon tank. This ma- 
chine covers a six-foot strip of road at each 
passage. 

The expense of oiling roads is small com- 
pared with other methods of road making, 
varying with the depth of dust or material 
applied from $200 to $ 600 per mile, twelve 
feet wide. The oil is at present being sup- 
plied and applied at a cost to the counties of 
about $1.25 per barrel, varying with the dis- 
tance of haul and the freight rates for the 
particlar locality. Properly prepared and 
oiled a road, with occasional retouching, 
will remain impervious to water and dust- 
less for years, the solid asphaltum base be- 
ing permanent. 

The use of oil in road making may be 
safely said to have passed the stage of ex- 
periment. For the past three years, it has 
been applied to all kinds aud conditions of 
soil throughout the state, with a result so 
convincing of its unquestionable merit that 
hundreds of miles of roads have been 
treated. For about three years the streets 
of Bakersfield have had no other paving 



than oil with the result that no town in the 
state can boast of better streets. Of late 
many towns have followed the example of 
Bakersfield. In Stockton a number of 
blocks in the main portion of the city have 
been oiled, crushed rock being Introduced in 
connection with the oil to give a more solid 
body to the cementing mixture. 

In San Francisco and San Leandro similar 
work is now going on. The city council of 
Los Angeles has adopted an ordinance pro- 
viding that after the 1st of January, 1904 all 
new macadam streets shall be treated with 
oil. 

Other important uses to which oil has re- 
cently been put are for the protection of 
river levees and for the preservation of 
wooden bridge coverings. In the latter case, 
the oil, mixed with fine gravel and sand, 
plays the double part of protecting the 
planks from wear of travel and of preserv- 
ing them against decay. 

There is another phase of this branch of 
the oil industry which has attracted some 
attention. Itis the question of real economy. 
There is no doubt that with the present vast 
supply of oil, and crude processes of refining, 
this use of the whole oil is justifiable for road 
making. But the question arises, will the 
supply continue in its present bountiful 
proportion, and moreover, will we not in 
time devise cheaper means of separating the 
valuable constituents that are now wasted 
by evaporation? 

Such speculations are out of place in a 
technical article. Leaving them for con- 
sideration in more appropriate space, but 
with this brief rcognition of their importance 
we will conclude with the safe statement, 
that, under existing conditions, the use of 
the heavier grades of California petroleum 
for road making is a most successful and 
economical industry. 



New Maps Nearly Completed. 

The well known firm of Barlow & Hill, 
now famous for its reliable maps, has about 
completed their new "up-to-date" maps of 
the Kern River, McKittrick, Midway, 
Coalinga, and Santa Maria oil fields and will 
shortly have the new edition on sale. The 
new maps will be neatly bound in a booklet 
which will contain all the information pre- 
sented in the old series, such as the bounds of 
the several companies' holdings, the location 
of the wells, reservoirs, railways, public 
highways, principal hotels in the oil fields, 
and a complete diretory of every reliable 
company operating in the California oil 
fields. The rapid progress of development 
work, especially in the local fields, has made 
the old oil maps of little value to those inter- 
ested here, hence the demand for a new 
edition. Equal care has been exercised in 
gathering data for the Coalinga and Santa 
Maria maps and the drawings will be greatly 
appreciated. They also prepared a map, in- 
dicating the several oil fields of the state. 
The general outlines of the districts are pre- 
sented, but no sub-division is made of the 
holdings of the several companies. The old 
issue of maps reached the enormous circu- 
lation of 50,000 copies and reached every 
part of the civilized world. 

We manufacture the best 
lubricating oils for oil 
drillers 

KING KEYSTONE OIL CO., 
116 Front St., San Francisco. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Upward Course of the Eastern 
Crude Market. 



I'.nnsylvaia crude oil Is now quoted at 
$i 90 at Oil City. Pa. Certificates have been 
bid as high as $2 per barrel within the past 
ten days. This indicates that the bidder be- 
lieves the market will go above $2 in the 
near future. Indications are that the pres- 
ent advance will continue, as the supply 
does not increase in proportion to the de- 
mand. 

The bid of $2 for 10,000 barrels of oil re- 
presented by National Transit certificates 
was made by a former prominent broker on 
the floor of the exchange in the halcyon days 
of speculation. With the exception of the 
year 1895, this bid Is the highest in 25 years, 
or since the opening and development of the 
prolific Bradford, Pa. field. 

On April 17, 1895, certificates sold at $2.69. 
The opening price on that day was $2 60, 
and after advancing to $2,69 the market be- 
came weak under the pressure to realize on 
their paper profits by speculators, and de- 
clined rapidly with few sales to $2.12, subse- 
quently rallying to $2.17 at the close. The 
clearances, or total transactions, on the ex- 
change that day were 352,000 barrels. The 
average daily price of certificates during the 
month of April was $1.7^ 94-100, and the av- 
erage daily clearances were 179,420 barrels. 

In the Trenton limestone district of Ohio 
and Indiana the advance has been still more 
remarkable, considering the small beginnings 
of the industry. The first price paid for 
Treoton limestone oil was 40 cents a barrel, 



where it remained until August 13, 1886, 
when the heavy production brought about a 
reduction to 37'.: cents. Another decline 
was make on August 26, 1886, to 35 cents ; 
February 28, 1887, to 30 cents; May 17. to 
25 cents: June 21 to 20 cents; July 14 to 
cents, and on July 20, 1887, to 15 cents. 

The oil remained at 15 cents from July 20, 
1887, to March 6, 1890, when it advanced to 
20 cents; on March io to 121 cents; March 
13 to 23 cents ; March 18 to 25 cents ; May 
6, 1890, to 2-jtf cents ; October 22, 30 cents. 
The 30-cent price remained until December 
2, t89t, when it advanced 1% cents and 
went to 35 cents on December 3. On May 
10, 1892, the price was 37^ cents, where It 
stood the remainder of the year. In the 
year 1893 the highest price paid was 49 
cents, on May 13, and the lowest 42^ cents 
on January t3, In 1894 the lowest price was 
50 cents, on January 17, and the highest 55 
cents, on December 26. 

In r895 the lowest was on January r, at 
55 cents and the highest— $1 27 — was on 
April 16. In 1896 57 cents was the lowest 
and 90 cents was the highest, on January 1. 
From the first of 1897 the price gradually 
declined until it reached 46 cents on October 
18, where it remained until February 16, 
1898, when it went to 47 cents. During the 
balance of 1898 it increased in price gradu- 
ally to December 23, at 80 cents ; on Febru- 
ary 28, r899, dropped to 79 cents ; went to 
81 cents May 16, the year ending with oil at 
$1.17. On Febru-ry 16, 1900, it reached 
$1.26, and gradually declined to 87 cents at 
the close. The year 1901 closed with an 85- 



cent price. The lowest figure for oil during 
1901 was 79 cents— May 16— where it re- 
mained until July 17, then going to 80 cents. 
The year 1902 started with 8scent oil, and 
In April an advance started, and a* the close 
of the year the crude product was bringing 
fi.15. The year 1903 started with oil at 
$1.15, but on November 20 reached the price 
of $1.30 a barrel, and since that time $1,33, 
which is 6 cents above the highest price oj 
any former year. 



We Pull For Leschens. 

"We Pull For Leschens," Is what yon 
read on the large leather collars of the 
horses attached to the wagons of A. 
Leschen & Sons Rope company, in St. 
Louis, New York, Chicago and Denver. 
These are the wagons which they de- 
liver their reels and colls of Hercules 
and Patent Flattened Strand and all 
other kinds of Wire Rope. 

A. Leschen & Sons Rope Co., also 
manufacture and erect JEria\ Wire Rope 
Tramways of every description; likewse, 
underground and surface wire rope haul- 
age plants. Their engineers in charge 
of the different departments have had 
years' experience and are thoroughly 
competent. 

920 to 932 North First St., St. Louis, 
Mo., Is the home address of A. Leschen 
& Sons Rope Company. 



The subscription price of the Pacific Oii. 
Reortkr is $2.50 per year. 



Monthly Exports of Oil from San Francisco. 





Mineral,, Crude, 


Mineral, Refined, or Manufactured. 


Countries. 


INCLUDING NAT- 
URAL OILS, WITH- 
OUT REGARD TO 
GRAVITY. 


Naphtha, including 
All Lighter Prod- 
ucts of Distillation. 


Illuminating. 


Lubricating 

and Heavy Paraffine 

Oils. 


Residuum, including 

Tar and all other 
from which the light 
bodies have been dis- 
tilled. 




Gallons 


Value 


Gallons 


Value 


Gallons 


Value 


Gallons 


Value 


Bbls. 


Value 


September, 1903. 














472 

80 

8J7 


$132 

3' 

282 
















1,050 
3,450 
1,100 


$139 
723 
218 












































50 8 
19 
38 


56 

75 

165 
















1,960 
1,300 


308 
295 








































1,110 


$110 


1,260 


253 


IS8 


87 


















1,008,000 
1,806,000 


$36,000 
60,200 






45o 

125,500 

50 


92 

15.703 

13 


305 
7.417 


189 

2,943 








31,920 


4,538 














2,814.000 


$96,200 


33.030 


$4,648 


136,120 


$•7,744 


io,347 


$3,960 






October, 1903. 














479 
301 

3,147 


$■44 

9' 

1,048 












220 


$47 


600 
2,780 
2,200 


$120 
562 

444 




















700 
100 
100 


159 
18 
23 


























6,690 
200 


1,160 

44 


186 
7»9 

2 190 
2,581 

30O 
10,838 

718 


76 
295 

670 
564 

125 

3.852 
414 








527 


$34 












































490 

26,650 

50 

10 


411 

5,392 

9 

2 








2,772,000 


92,400 


21,766 


2,346 




























2,772,527 


$92,434 


22.886 


$2,593 


39,27o 


$7,847 


21. 511 


$7,279 






November, 1903. 














207 

76 

180 


$55 
25 
70 
















500 
3,5io 

450 
1,000 
2,109 


$1.8 
773 
105 
225 
319 












3° 


$8 












































260 
81 
3,806 
20O 
'97 
526 


98 

41 

840 

50 

49 

167 










































100 


25 


































160 

2,141 

36.250 


I 4 
365 

7.775 


















348 








1.974,000 


$65,800 


18.220 


2,191 


550 
I',3SO 4 ' 744 








1,974,000 


$65,8110 


18,350 


$2,224 46.120 $9,704 


17,433 ' $6,487 








PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ftisss 



I 



NEWS FROM TDE FIELD 



Supplied by our Regular Correspondents 

Halfmoon Bay. 

Half Moon Bay, Dec. 23, 1903. 



Since the bringing in of the gusher and 
the great fire, much interest has been taken 
in this territory. Though the rainy season 
is on and may continue up to Mareb or 
April, much active work is going forward. 
Immediately after the destruction by fire of 
the drilling rig, it was replaced by new der- 
ricks, orders were placed and quickly filled 
for machinery supplies and materials which 
are now on the ground and being placed in 
shape for active operations. 

The Wisconsin Company will begin the 
drilling of several wells in this territory as 
soon as weather conditions will permit. They 
now have a deep well completed, which has 
already produced considerable oil. 

The Duchess Oil Company will begin the 
drilling of a number of wells early in the 
spring, having already made arrangements 
for supplies and materials, 

The Paxton Company has a well, almost 
completed, but has been temporarily delayed 
in the work waiting for another string of 
pipe. They have at the present time a well 
that would produce several barrels per day, 
yet they have not struck the oil sand. 

These Companies are located on the Tuni- 
tas Creek and are under the mangement of 
J. E. Kerr of San Francisco, Cal., who has 
personally spent a great deal of money in 
this territory in the drilling of a number of 
wells over a period of almost two years, the 
kickers, knockers and doubters, wherever 
present, meanwhile predicting failure, claim- 
ing that other companies had drilled in this 
territory without success. Mr. Kerr stayed 
with these companies, putting in his own 
cash, working at times under the most trying 
conditions, until at last his persistent efforts 
have been rewarded by the bringing in of 
the recent gusher. 

The Independent well, which has made 
the big strike, is owned by Mr. Kerr and St. 
Paul parties, who will take up extensive 
development work next year. 

As the Reporter has always predicted and 
a great many practical oil men have stated, 
Halfmoon Bay will yet develop into one of 
the most important in this state. There are 
a number of other companies operating in 
this field, among the High Gravity Oil Com- 
pany, which is but a few hundred feet away 
from the above mentioned companies. 

The Gulberson, Saylee and Haine wells, 
located in the Purissima canyon, northwest 
of the wells located on Tunitas creek are 
getting in supplies and materials for the 
drilling of some new wells, Nos. 8 and 9, to 
be located one-fourth of a mile from their 
present producing wells. 

The Pllarcltos Oil company is working 
after experiencing a great deal of difficulty 
In getting in fuel. 

The San Mateo Oil company is still at 
work, which has been carried on under 
gieat difficulties. The location of this well 
is about three miles south and west of the 
companies located on Tunitas creek. 

A new company is hauling in lumber for 
the building of a derrick on the ranch of 
Moran. Very little work can be done in 



this territory until alter the rainy season is 
over, from the fact that the properties are 
located in the hills, and mountainous roads 
cannot be used for hauling heavy freight at 
the present time of the year. 

Those companies that have been supplied 
with material will commence work as fast as 
possible, as the recent great strike proves 
the territory as the highest grade oil ever 
found in California. 



Wyoming Letter. 



Evanston, Wyo., Dec. 22, 1903. 

The latest corporation to enter our oil 
fields is the Star Oil Company, a concern 
whose home is at Mt. Pleasant, Mich. The 
company is incorporated for 10,000 shares of 
a par value of $1 each. The trustees for the 
first year are Charles J. Myers, Erwin D. 
Morrison, George A. Hicks, Franklin W. 
Ellis, Edward D. Dittman ,W. E. Dersnah, 
Wm. Walker, Abraham A. Myers and Arthur 
N. Ward. 



now finds Itself with a stock of 7,000,000 or 
8,000,000 barrels, and it will not be a long 
time before this is finished. Therefore, it Is 
to the interests of this concern to encourage 
search for oil everywhere in this continent. 
West Virginia, I consider, is the greatest oil 
field at the present time. Wyoming will be 
the greatest of the future. Only a few days 
ago the Standard Oil Company paid $120,- 
000 for 1000 acres of land and a well, whose 
output is 80 barrels a day, in West Virginia. 
The wells in Russia are falling. Investi- 
gation of oil conditions in the United States 
shows that the supply is no greater than the 
demand. 

" Big foreign companies see splendid 
chances for investment and they come over 
here with wealth and they get the cream of 
the market." 

Mr. Verbak added that certain corporations 
of France and Belgium that are engaged in 
mining and oil enterprises in this country 
are backed by unlimited capital. They are 
prepared to spend fortunes in development. 




Well of the M. K. & T. Oil Company, Coalinga. 



A. H. Gray arrived in the city yesterday 
from New York City and will remain in our 
oil fields until the first of the year. He was 
sent to Wyoming as a representative of the 
Universal Oil Company and other easterners 
who are interested in our coming industry. 
He says that his people are well pleased 
with the progress made thus far and predicts 
that a large amount of eastern capital will 
come into Uinta county next summer. 

Mr. Verbak is on his way to investigate 
the oil fields of Wyoming, as a representative 
of a powerful French company which in- 
tends to spend an enormous amount of 
money in developing wells in Wyoming and 
elsewhere. 

"This is my first visit to the United 
States," said he, " and I hope it will not be 
my last. I hear a great deal of talk about 
the Standard Oil Company, and I have this 
to say : This company is the servant of the 
oil producers. Oil is $1 90 per barrel and be- 
fore next June it will be $2.50 per barrel. 
The Standard Oil Company, once so great 
and strong with its 40,000,000 barrels of oil, 



Prominent among those concerns is the So- 
cietie Belgo-Americaina des Petroles du 
Wyoming. The company does not include 
Mr. Verbak, however. Only a few weeks 
ago it purchased from the Pennsylvania Oil 
& Gas Company the Salt Creek fields, lo- 
cated 50 miles north of Casper, and embrac- 
ing 150,000 acres. It also secured possession 
of the Henderson field, near Lander. Some 
of the oil taken recently from one of the 
wells was of such high quality that it sold 
for $15 per barrel, being used for lubricating 
purposes only. Oil came in great quantities 
from some of the wells lately and flowed into 
pools and lakes. Flocks of ducks, seeking 
shelter, dropped into the lakes and were 
later discovered dead, the oil having killed 
them. The company, it is understood, paid 
$700,000 in cash for the Salt Creek fields. 

Mr. Verbak is also interested in gold min- 
ing, and has visited several properties with a 
view of purchasing them. He has made a 
life-long study, however, of the oil question, 
and will devote most of his time promoting 
oil companies in his native city. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Coalings Letter. 



COALINGA, PeC. 22, I903. 

Number 4 rig, for the Caribou Oil Com- 
pany, is nearlng completion and drilling will 
begin in a short time. Its well, which was 
deepened some weeks ago, Is keeping up the 
prodnction of nearly 500 barrels per day. 

The Wabash Oil Company spudded in on 
its No. 2 well on the iStb. The manage- 
ment claims that in its first well the entire 
depth of the oil sand v\as not penetrated, 
and that its intention is to go deeper In No. 
2, or at least to a depth that will satisfy them 
of having passed through the whole of the 
oil sand. 

The California Oilfields Limited is rigging 
up another well, to be drilled to the deeper 
sand. 

Oil City Petroleum Company is still at 
work on its No. 8. Number 9 rig is up and 
work on it will begin as soon as No. 3 Is 
finished. 

Mr. A. E. Webb has gained control of the 
northeast quarter of section 10, 21-15. A 
water well has been finished on this prop- 
erty prepartory to beginning work drilling 
for oil. A company is now in progress of 
formation, cousistlng largely of Fresnians, 
who, when organization is completed, ex- 
pect to do development work. This infor 
mation comes from authentic sources, with 
the assurance that work will begin in the im- 
mediate future. 

The Union Oil Company is nearly finished 
rigging up No. 4, on section 13. Work on 
this lease will continue uninterruptedly until 
the entire working clause, as stipulated in 
all railroad leases is complied with. 

The Associated Oil Co., on Section 24, has 
the lumber for two rigs on the ground, and 
as soon as the rig builders have finished with 
the Union Oil company's rig, work on the 
Associated rig will begin. One of the der- 
ricks has been erected for several months, 
but for some reason work was suspended 
until this time. 

The Grand Central Oil company, neal Al- 
calde, are making good progress. They are 
down about 600 feet. 

The Southern Pacific has just received a 
large pump which will be placed on Its pros- 
pective pumping plant on section 7. The 
10,000-barrel tank has been finished, a boiler 
is on the ground, a number of field lines 
have been laid extending into the producing 
section on the west side, all of which looks 
as though the company would be receiving 
oil in the near future. As far as can be 
learned no contracts have been signed with 
any producers for the delivery of oil. The 
railroad company reserves the right, how- 
ever, to take its royalty in oil, and that is 
the reason for the pipe line to the west side, 
where its leases are located. 

At a recent meeting held by the stockhold- 
ers of the Grass Valley-Coaling and Coal- 
inga Banner oil companies, at Grass Valley, 
it was decided to consolidate the two com- 
panies The two companies combined own 
forty acres in section 14-20-14 adjoining the 
R. C. Baker property. As soon as reorgani- 
zation is effected, work on its first well will 
be pushed. The land ajolns two leases with 
producing wells, that of the Union Oil com- 
pany and R. C. Baker, which makes the land 
a very valuable piece of property and a sure 
proposition. 

At present thirty strings of tools are run- 
ning In this field, excluding the wells that 
are being cleaned out or deepened. This is 



a large number, when it is considered that 
the number of producing wells does not ex- 
ceed 115 In the Coallnga district. Besides 
this there are now being rigged up prepara- 
tory to begin drilling at once twelve new 
rigs. The pred'etion that was made at the 
outset of the present year that Coalinga 
would double the number of Its producing 
wells during 1903 can no longer be ques- 
tioned, because nearly fifty new producing 
wells have already swelled the list of the 
grand total. At the present rate of Increase 
in the number of weds, Coalinga will com- 
pete — in a few years — for first rank in the 
State. 

R. M. D. 

Kern River Letter. 



Bakersfield, Dec. 24, 1903. 

The Standard has Issued an order that 
hereafter no more than 500 pounds pressure 
must be placed on the pipe lines through 
the field at Kern River. The tendency of 
some companies has been to force all the oil 
possible through the lines and the pressure 
has been sufficient on several recent occa- 
sions to burst the pipe and cause much 
trouble. These and other incidental causes, 
such as the Inability to complete reservoirs 
rapidly enough, have caused some delay in 
accepting oil and some contracts have not 
been renewed promptly. The company Is 
however taking all the oil that it can handle 
and is striving in every way to handle more. 

The pipe line is at present carrying only 
Coalinga oil and the reports show that there is 
enough of this on hand to work the line to 
the limit for some time to come. The chief 
trouble with the line in fact seems to be that 
it is not big enough to handle the quantity 
of oil that is awaiting transportation to mar- 
ket. 

The Standard officials of course have no 
information to give out as to the chances for 
the great refinery announced recently being 
built at Kern River but one of them a few 
days ago dropped a hint to a prominent oil 
man indicating very plainly that It is the in- 
tention to build at an early date. The opin- 
ion is quite general and borne out in some 
ways by circumstantial evidence that the 
plant will be located on section 7 west of 
the tanks and along the line of the railroad. 
The land belongs to the Southern Pacific 
and that company recently had It marked off 
and signs placed to indicate its limits. 

While the pipe line is idle from Coalinga 
south, oil is being shipped in large quanti- 
ties by rail, heavy trains going north daily. 
There is considerable complaint from some 
producers that they cannot get the necessary 
cars to enable them to ship their product. 
That there is some ground for this com- 
plaint there is no doubt, but there is some 
question as to whether it is due entirely to 
either a lack of cars or a desire to favor cer- 
tain companies at the expense of others. 
The fact is well known that both the 
Santa Fe and Southern Pacific are both 
short of motor power and are very hard 
pushed to handle their business. Hundreds 
of cars are frequently delayed in the yards 
here on this account and some believe that 
this is, in part at least, the real reason why 
it Is sometimes so difficulty to get oil trans- 
ported by rail. 

While the Standard's great refinery Is be- 
ing talked of here, the Southwestern 
and Eastern Consolidated plants are ap- 
proaching completion and will probably be 



working shortly after the first of the year. 
The California-Kern Is working on a plant 
of 1 coo barrels capacity which will be fin- 
ished in the course of several months, bar- 
ring the usually unavoidable delays In get- 
ting material. The King Refining company 
Is about to enlarge Its plant to double lis 
present capacity. It now has its entire 
output contracted for in advance and can 
not half supply the demand. Its asphalt Is 
now used in twenty-five cities of the United 
States and in a number In Canada. What 
Is true of the King is doubtless true of the 
other plants now in operation and there are 
no indications that the completion of new 
ones will result In any falling off of busi- 
ness on account of competition, but that on 
the contrary all these built will be kept busy 
supplying the demand. With the comple- 
tion of the California-Kern, Southwestern 
and Eastern Consolidated plants there will 
be a total of nine refineries in Kern county. 

N. E. Conklin and L. E. Doan of this city, 
have purchased the patent and all the rights 
for the Hardlson Perforator which is In 
general use in the oil wells throughout this 
state. 

Last week the suit of the Minnehaha Oil 
company versus the Sinnenahonlng Oil 
company was tried before Judge Mahon in 
the superior court of this county and has 
been taken under advisement by the court. 
The suit involves the possession of valuable 
oil lands on 19, 28-28 at Kern River owned 
by the Minnehaha and leased to the Sinne- 
mahonlng. The Minnehaha seeks to have 
the lease declared forfeited on the ground 
that Its terms have not been complied with. 

The Green & Whittler well No. 3 has de- 
veloped a most extraordinary freak as yet 
not satisfacorily explained. This well was 
always considered a remarkable one from 
the fact that It was drilled to a depth of 
1,140 feet, the last 400 being entirely through 
oil sands without any layer of clay inter- 
vening. For some time the Associated 
which now controls the Green & Whlttier 
property, had been having a great deal of 
difficulty with this well and it was decided 
to pull the tubing and investigate. 
When this was done the workmen were 
dumbfounded to discover that the last 
240 feet had been out of plumb to such an 
extent as to render them useless. A num- 
ber of theories have been advanced to ac- 
count for this but none appear to be entirely 
tenable. As no other wells are reported to 
have been affected in a similar manner it is 
considered certain that the cause is entirely 
local. For this reason the theory advanced 
by some that the oil sand has moved as is 
the case with mountains in a few parts of 
the world is not taken seriously. 

The Associated is endeavoring to solve 
the problem of disposing of the waste oil 
from the wells of Kern River by establishing 
a huge basin of twenty-one acres near the 
river which it has leased for ten years from 
E. M. Roberts of Bakersfield. The rental is 
$300 a year with option of purchase at $1.25 
an acre. The oil men have been gieatly 
troubled by this question of the disposal of 
the waste oil from their wells, it having 
flowed Into the river and polluted the water 
to such an extent that the agriculturists 
headed by the Kern County Land company, 
Miller & Lux and others large owners have 
threatened several times to sue for damages 
if the trouble is not remedied. It is thought 
that the establishment of this huge basin 

Continued on Page Eleven. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



00<>0<>000<><KK>0<>000000<»<«><>00«0000<>00«<X>OOOOOVO<IO<)0000<>00 

I The Alaska Petroleum Field. 

I The Annual Report of the Governor of Our Most | 
I Northern Territory. | 



OO«K>CO<XK>O0<>OO<X)<><K>O0O0<K)OO<>O0O0«><><>OO<XI«<><>OOOO<><M>OO<) -oooooooooooooooo 

The annual report of the governor of 
Alaska, which has just been received by the 
Secretary of the Interior, contains a very in- 



teresting account of the development of the 
oil fields of that territory and of other mine- 
ral resources. The Governor's suggestion 
for legislation prohibiting the taking up of 
oil claims by power of attorney will no doubt 
attract general attention. These features of 
the report are as follows : 

"The greatest interest this year has been 
centered upon the oil fields. There seems to 
be seepages of oil all the way from Yakutat 
west through the Alaska Peninsula, and al- 
most the whole shore line there has been 
staked. 

" For instance, those who recorded claims 
at Sitka, two men have recorded 230 claims 
of 160 acres each, being eight locators on 
each claim. This was done by the two men 
locating for themselves, and for twenty-four 
others as attorneys. Another man recorded 
63 claims of 160 acres each for himself and 
as attorney for about thirty others. Still an- 
other man recorded two claims of 160 acres 
each for himself and as attorney for others. 
These claims are taken up under the placer 
miners' law. 

" The greatest interest is centered on the 
mainland along Controllers' Bay. One com- 
pany, locally known as the ' English com- 
pany,' are the pioneers, and others have fol- 
lowed in their steps. Last year this company 
drilled a well to 365 feet and had oil shoot- 
ing to beyond the tops of the derricks. They 
got it under control finally, and this year 
they undertook to sink the hole deeper, but 
did not meet with success. The last report 
is that they have perforated the casing at 
the depth where the first oil flowed — namely, 
365 feet — and started to pumping, and suc- 
ceeded well in the pumping, but after awhile 
the pressure of the gas now causes the oil to 
flow at the rate of 40 barrels a day, and they 
are managing to take care of the oil as it 
flows. The oil is said to be worth $3 a bar- 
rel right on the ground where it is taken. 
It seems to stand the test well and has what 
they call a paraffin base, and is regarded as 
the best oil on the continent of America. 

" It is noticed that this year oil experts and 
men skilled in the business from every quar- 
ter have visited these locations and are still 
on the ground. A number of machines are 
at work, and, while no gushers have been 
struck, every oil man seems to feel it in his 
bones that the country is a great oil district. 
They say the formations are right, the see- 
pages can be trusted, and that the gas which 
comes from the boring is a good Indication 
and that the coal formations are no detriment. 
"There Is no doubt that during the coming 
year there will be a very great outlay in the 
attempt to strike these oil beds by drilling. 
The possibilities which are before us along 
those shores which Captain Cook touched in 
1778, and named the island Kayes Island, 
after a good old English canon, are wonder- 
ful in the extreme. It will surely be with- 
in the bounds of the possible that inside the 
next twenty years a large city will be built 



up as the result of the development of these 
two products which the world needs so badly 
coal and oil. 

"There is a considerable abundance of fair 
timber and good water power, which can be 
utilized in most of the places, so that the 
winter temperature is not severe, although 
the snowfall in some seasons is very con- 
siderable. If the real material is there, there 
can be no doubt as to the future greatness of 
that part of the coast of Alaska. 

"Locations for oil have been made upon 
the Kenal Peninsula, and at several places 
upon the Alaska Peninsula there have been 
locations, and one firm is bravely at work at 
Cold Bay, where the seepages and indica- 
tions seem to be quite as favorable as those 
seen near Kayak. Wells have been driven 
near Iliamna, but we have no Information 
with regard to their success. 

"There is a universal cry by the miners of 
Alaska against the abuse of locating mining 
and other claims by power of attorney. This 
is carried on to such an extent that pretty 
soon there will be hardly any area left in 
Alaska for exploration ; as witness what was 
stated above in regard to oil locations at 
Yakutat, where two men located 51,200 acres 
of land under the placer mining act. It is 
hardly supposable that they have even 
driven the stakes upon that amount of land, 
yet they have recorded it, and it is sufficient 
to deter others from going upon it and ex- 
ploring it. 

"Now this kind of thing has been going 
on all along the southern coast of Alaska, 
making locations for oil and coal, and all 
through the placer mining regions. When 
men the past winter rushed to the Tanana 
at great labor and expense, they found the 
whole region staked, and nothing but a feel- 
ing of disgust came over them. 

" Congress should at once remedy this 
kind of abuse. Prospectors who make dis- 
coveries have, of course, the right to take 
the choice of location, and all miners are will- 
ing that they should be allowed to make an 
additional location as a reward for their 
discovery. Those people who outfit pros- 
pectors should expect to have no other re- 
ward than to share in the claims which the 
prospector is allowed to have. Now a man 
comes here armed with a load of powers of 
attorney legally executed and can go into a 
district and tie it all up for a couple of years. 
This produces discontent. 

" The placer mining law of allowing twenty 
acres to the claim is liberal enough, but be- 
fore the man records such claim he should 
make affidavit to the recorder that he has 
discovered the kind of mineral upon it for 
which he records it. 

"Congress will receive the thanks of all 
the miners and fair-minded people if it will 
amend the laws to cure this evil during the 
coming season. 

" In former reports it has been urged that 
a mining commissioner, with a proper num- 
ber of assistants, be provided by law. Con- 
gress provides for two special agents to look 
after the salmon fisheries ; for years we have 



had special agents looking after the fur-seal 
industry ; we have an agricultural agent, 
and are establishing stations, as is eminently 
proper; the Interior Department can send 
its agents to look after timber and lands, but, 
while we are rightly doing these things, we 
let the mining industry severely alone. If 
a stranger comes into the country seeking 
information, he cannot be directed to any 
Government office where he can obtain 
accurate and reliable information on the 
mining euterprises in this district. But if he 
should stop at Victoria, British Columbia, 
and make the same kind of inquiry, he 
would be directed to the office of the min- 
ister of mines, where he could learn every 
important fact concerning any kind of min- 
ing in any district of the Province. The 
annual reports of that officer are master- 
pieces in the line of printed information and 
illustrations. Surely the time has come 
when a similar kind of work should be in- 
augurated. 

" If the Department of Commerce and 
Labor is to have a bureau of mines, then let 
Alaska be organized as a division of the 
bureau. To delay this step longer will Indi- 
cate shiftlessness not in keeping with our 
pride as a progressive people." 



Petroleum Fields of Alaska. 



A preliminary examination of the pe- 
troleum fields of Alaska was made last sum- 
mer by Dr. G. C. Martin, of the United States 
Geological Survey, who headed a party that 
sailed on June 7th from Seattle for the Con- 
troller Bay region. The first month was 
spent in making an examination of the coast 
of Controller Bay and vicinity, from the 
neighborhood of the Copper River delta to 
Cape St. EHas, and of the valley of the Chil- 
kat river for a distance of about forty miles 
from the coast. This region includes what 
is known as the Kayak oil field. Dr. Mar- 
tin's task was to study the relation of the oil 
sands to the rocks exposed at the surfce, to 
map the approximate outlines of the oil belt, 
and to determine what portions of it are 
likely to be of most value. A trip was made 
up the Chilkat river, which flows into Con- 
troller bay, to the coal fields that lie behind 
the Controller Bay oil fields at the foot of 
the Chugach mountains. Dr. Martin spent 
the second month in the oil fields on the 
west shore of Cook Inlet. A map was made of 
he shore from a point north of Chlnitua 
bay to the mouth of Iliama bay, including 
the shores of Chinitua bay, Dry bay, Oil 
bay and Enochkin bay. From Enochkin 
bay Dr. Martin's party proceeded to Cold bay 
on the Alaskan peninsula, where the last 
few days of the season were spent in a 
hasty examination of that field. 



Petroleum Intoxication. 



A press dispatch (unaccompanied by affi- 
davits) has been sent out from Parkersburg, 
W. Va., stating that one William Johnson 
and his wife are lying in bed in a semi-con- 
scious condition, and two daughters are 
staggering about the house hardly able to 
stand, as a result of eating salt saturated 
with petroleum oil. The dispatch also states 
that they "see double". Haven't we all 
been in the same condition and who ever 
thought of it being caused by petroleum, and 
wouldn't we rather call it "petroleum intoxi- 
cation" than "plain drunk". Here's a sug- 
gestion. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



The Scotch vs. the American Oil 
Industry. 

The Standard Oil company bas not been 
able to prevent a shrinkage In the yield 
from the Pennsylvania oil wells, which pro- 
duce not only the best burning oil in Amer- 
ica, bnt which also give forth a crude oil 
which yields the largest supply of solid 
paraffine, or "scale" of any of the mineral 
oils of America, says the London Economist. 
Hence, the Standard Oil company have had 
to raise their price for "scale" in the Eu- 
ropean markets, and latterly to practically 
retire from the British markets, which they 
have been accustomed to divide (on their 
own terms) with the Scotch paraffine oil 
makers. Therefore, the Scotch companies 
have been enabled to get a large advance 
upon last year for thetr wax, or "scale" — 
which is used for candle-making and match- 
making chiefly — and will probably get a 
still further advance before the oil year ex- 
pires at the close of March next. 

The Pennsylvanian mineral oil is practi- 
cally the only competitor the Scotch com- 
panies have in this product. The other min- 
eral oils of America yield only a small pro- 
portion of this solid material, and the Rus- 
sian natural oils do not yieid it at all. But 
the Russian companies are the chief com- 
petitors of the Scotch companies in the sale 
of lamp oil in the British Isles. Once upon 
a time it was American petroleum that 
drowned out Scottish paraffine oil. Nowa- 
days it is Russian oil that rules, especially in 
Ireland and Scotland. And the competition 
between the two great Russian syndicates 
to obtain the sole control of these markets 
has during the last year or two depressed 
the price of burning oil to a point unrenu- 
merative to the Scotch companies, who dis- 
til it not from natural oil, but from a min- 
eral substance like slatey coal. 

The Russian companies are now tired of 
this profitless competition. Last week the 
export price at Baku was raised by eight 
kopecks per pood, and crude naphtha was 
raised to ten kopecks, on account of the 
restricted output, During the first nine 
months of this year the yield was about 20,- 
000,000 poods less than in the corresponding 
period of last year, and it has been still 
further reduced by the stoppage of a num- 
ber or wells which are the subject of litiga- 
tion. Following upon this the Caucasian 
Petroleum Export company have advanced 
the price of their lamn oil to 12 cents per 
gallon delivered in England. Selling upon 
this basis the Scotch companies will obtain 
fully 1 cent per gallon more for their para- 
ffine (burning) oil than they did last year. 
They will not get this advance for the whole 
season's make, because the contract season 
begins in August, and no doubt some con- 
tracts have been made for winter delivery 
at the old price. But the companies were 
not eager sellers, because they were looking 
for an advance in Russian oil, and also be- 
cause in September and October they were 
In the midst of a wages dispute with their 
shale miners which threatened to suspend 
the whole industry for an indefinite period. 
These men who mine the shale on which 
the whole industry depends claimed not 
only an advance in wages (and they were 
already earning about 25 cents a day more 
than their fellow-workers in the adjacent 
and more hazardous coal-pits), but to be 
rated hereafter in relation to the fortunes of 
the oil industry and not as miners. To this 
the oil companies could not consent, because 



there Is but one labor market in so far as 
mining is concerned In Scotland, and to 
make a new market for shale miners would, 
In the long run, be as disadvantageous to the 
men as to the employeis. A general strike 
was only averted by a reference of the 
claim of the shale miners for an advance to 
arbitration, and the case is still awaiting de- 
cision. A very disastrous strike was averted 
at a time when the fortunes of the Scotch 
oil companies were more promising than 
they have been for many years. 

The advantage to be gained in paraffine 
oil from the advance in Russian petroleum 
is to a large extent prospective. Bnt In an- 
other respect Russia competes with Scot- 
land, and that is in certain qualities of heavy 
oils used for machinery and lubricating pur- 
poses. These oils were held down all last 
year by the fierce competition of two Russian 
syndicates, but this year these syndicates 
have come under a compact not to sell un- 
der certain fixed standard rates. On the 
basis of this arrangement the Scotch com- 
panies are, and have been for some time, re- 
ceiving about $7.25 per ton more than last 
year for their production of this particular 
class of oils. 

In other classes of heavy oils the chief 
competitor of the Scotch companies is the 
Standard Oil Company of America. But 
these oils of the Standard company are ex- 
tracted mainly from the crude oil of the 
Pennsylvania wells, and are consequently, 
reduced by the shortage of these wells. 
Hence the Standard company have had to 
restrict their sales and raise their prices 
so that on their production of equivalent oils 
the Scotch companies are obtaining about 
$9.50 per ton more than last year. In 
naphtha, another important product, an ad- 
vance of about r cent per gallon is being 
realized. 

In sulphate of ammonia, of which the 
Scotch oil companies make a great deal, but 
of which neither the American nor the Rus- 
sian companies are producers, an advance 
was being obtained earlier in the season of 
first about $8.50 and then about $4 .85 per ton 
over the average of last year. The price is 
now down again to about the average, but 
the net results of the current year In this 
item must show a considerable improvement 
on last year. 

On the whole, proceeds our contemparary, 
with the higher prices which are now being 
realized for the principal products, the 
Scotch oil companies should be able when 
the accounts are made up in March and 
April next to show an increase of $1,000,000 
in the year's earnings. They will doubtless 
also be able to show some further savings in 
the cost of manufacture, but not very much 
need be expected under this heading, be- 
cause during the past two or three years all 
the resources of itheir scientific attainments 
and technical experience have been taxed to 
the utmost in order to make both ends meet 
under low markets. But some appreciable 
saving should be effected in coal and general 
material. 

On the other hand, labor is even costing as 
much as last year, and Is more likely to be 
higher than lower as the oil year advances. 
There are fully four months of the oil year 
still to run, and, of course, much may happen 
in that time, but from present appearances 
one may count both on larger dividends and 
on material Improvement in the financial 
and industrial condition of the companies 
when accounts are next squered. The pros- 
pect is, indeed, so good, that there is now a 



project to reconstruct the long derelict anu 
never very prosperous Burntisland Oil com- 
pany across the Frith of Fourth from Leith. 
It is to be hoped, however, that there will be 
no undue haste in reviving shipwrecked oil 
concerns. The Industry bas suffered too 
much in the past from both under and 
over capitalization, and it could easily be 
squeezed out of existence altogether by a 
combination of North American and South 
Russian producers. 

Advantages of Oil Fuel. 

A writer In Cassier's magazine for Novem- 
ber says that oil fuel for metallurgical oper- 
ating has a splendid future offering, as such 
operations do, every inducement for the 
satisfactory working of a n edium possessing 
such valuable heat-generating properties. 
As is well-known, of the heat produced In 
furnaces for melting metal, the proportion 
Imported to and usefully employed in reduc- 
ing the material Is comparatively small and 
disappointing. To remedy the excessive 
consumption of fuel and economize in the 
absorption of heat by unremuneratlve con- 
struction, many ingenious arrangements of 
furnaces have been devised; but although 
the more wasteful features have been ell' 
minated and unceasing efforts made to se- 
cure the greatest economy, the losses in- 
herent to furnaces designed for the utiliza- 
tion of solid fuel remain. With oil fuel the 
conditions are so modified that many of the 
disadvantages and losses in coal furnace- 
heating are no longer present, and an eco- 
nomy results which guarantees to the liquid 
a value satisfactory as compared to solid 
rivals. 

Apart, however, from any direct pecuniary 
advantage due to the cost of fuel required, 
the prospect of greatly increasing the output 
by substituting oil fuel offers a substantial 
inducement in many industrial operations, 
this increased production, the writer points 
out, being secured by the easy and exact 
regulation obtainable, the uniformity of the 
heat generated, and the concentration of the 
attention of the operator to the work in 
band. For scrap welding or bloom heating, 
oil fuel is well adapted. The melting and 
reducing of metals to which oil fuel also has 
been largely applied possess peculiarly 
promising features, and the results obtained 
are conclusive proof of its efficiency for the 
purpose. In brass foundries a considerable 
item of expense exists in the provision of 
the crucibles or " pots " for holding the metal, 
none of which can well be made available for 
mere than 35 heats, whereas If oil be used, 
the metal can be reduced direct in bulk with- 
out the employment of crucibles. Where 
large castings are required and one peculiar 
mixture of metal is desired, this is of great 
Importance, and it would be well for our 
English manufacturers to take notice of the 
many advantages oil fuel offers. 



Remember that our subscription rate is 
only $2.50 per year, for which we give the 
latest news from all the fields. 

FOR SALB 

A complete oil well drilling 
outfit near Huntington, Ore- 
gon. Inventory and price 
on application to 
H. V. GATES, Hillsboro, Oregon. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



NEWS FROM THE COAST 



1 



| Recent Developments in California Fields. 



essssr=s 



Santa Barbara. 



A paragraph in the Lompoc Journal recently rela- 
tive to the discovery of oil sand on the La Salle 
place, near the town of Lompoc, would not strike the 
casual observer as an it'm of any import, but to one 
familiar with the oil fields of the western end of the 
country it has a greater significance. What is known 
as the Lompoc anticline is situated in the hills on 
the north side of the Lompoc valley and is well de- 
fined for a distance of twenty miles, running parallel 
with the valley. All the wells tkat have been 
brought in in that section are north of this anticline 
or near the dome on the south side. Experts who 
were sent into the field to examine it have main- 
tained that the oil territory is confined to the north 
side of the valley. The country to the south of the 
river has none of the outcroppings and other indica- 
tions that usually guide experts in making locations 
Should it develop that Mr. La Salle really has found 
oil on his place, which is situated in the hills on the 
south side of the valley, it will add rew vigor to the 
oil boom that section of the county is now enjoying. 
There is a vast territory, adjacent to the La Salle 
ranch, suitable only for grazing purposes, that 
would become valuable property once it is proven to 
contain oil. The following is the paragraph re- 
ferred to: "Mr. Charles La Salle has been at work 
for some time running a tunnel into the side of a 
mountain near his home for the purpose of tapping 
a spring for irrigation purposs, and a few days ago 
he encountered oil-bearing sand in sufficient quanti- 
ties to convince him that this whole valley is pretty 
well saturated with oil and that the time is not far 
away when oil derricks may be seen standing in 
every direction, and a good flow of oil pouring forth 
from many wells." — Morning Press. 

Santa Maria. 

Mr. Elliott returned this week from Los Angeles, 
bringing with him a Standard; rig and a large 
supply of casing. Mr. Elliott has already sunk a 
hole on the Rice place in Cat canyon with his rotary 
drill to a depth of 500 feet, and encountered most 
favorable indications. On account of striking 
boulders the rotary had to be changed for a Stand- 
ard rig. 

Contrary to all expectations the Union Oil com- 
pany, will ship its product to Alcatraz landing 
through the Western Union pipe line via Careaga. 
A pumping plant is now being established at Graciosa 
from which point the oil is forced to Careaga. The 
Lompoc product will, for the present, go the same 
route. 

The Western Union company started sinking 
eight-inch casing on well No. 18 this week which is 
down about 420 feet. Preparations are under way 
for putting in a number of new rigs. 

The Brookshire continues to go down deeper each 
succeeding day and keeps up its good indications. 
In fact so sure are the directors of oil that another 
new well will be sunk shortly. At a meeting of the 
directors in San LuisObispoon Tuesday last, Patrick 
Moore was re-elected president. The other officials 
are: Paul O. Tietzen, vice' president; Henry Bahr, 
secretary. Directors: Thomas Brookshire, H. H. 
Carpenter, J. W Barneberg, D. D. Barnard, J. F. 
Goodwin was re-elected superintendent. The price 
of the company's stock was fixed at 50 cents per 
share. Stockholders were given an opportunity to 
increase their holdings 10 per cent. 



The Pinal company has at last been enabled to 
unload its oil. The first shipment on the big con- 
tract was made this week, when several carloads of 
oil were shipped to Port Harford. The big tank is 
completed with the exception of a few pipe connec- 
tions. 

Los Angeles. 

The situation in the Los Angeles oil field is un- 
changed and very little is doing in the way of field 
operations with the exception of those carried on by 
the Salt Lake Oil company and adjacent concern in 
the extreme western end of the field. And this sec- 
tion, by the way, is attracting more and more atten- 
tion among oil men and the latest developments 
would seem to indicate a pool here of considerable 
proportions. Carton & Co., recently brought in a 
well on their property directly north of the Salt 
Lake company's wells which astonished every one 
interested. The well was drilled about 200 feet 
deeper than the Salt Lake wells and another sand 
about 60 feet in depth was encountered. The well 
has been flowing intermitttently since it was brought 
in, but will be put to pumping at once. No accurate 
gauge of its capacity has been made, but it is a big 
well — probably the best in this pool. The oil here 
is of a gravity of from 18 to 20°, which, of course, 
makes it valuable, and the accessibility of the field 
makes it a desirable place to operate and land values 
in the vicinity have jumped to such a degree as to 
remind one of the boom days. It is stated that 
#1,000 an acre for some of the land has been re- 
fused and large bonuses are offered for leased pro- 
perty. The district certainly looks good and inter- 
ested parties state that the real oil excitement in 
connection with the pool is yet to come. Market 
conditions here remain about the same. The re- 
port that the Standard had shut down its Bakersfield 
pump" station and would not take any more Kern 
River oil to Point Richmond had a depressing effect 
on local operators, as it was thought that oil might 
be put on the market here, and as much of it was 
bought by the Standard at prices ranging from 10 
to 15 cents per barrel it was feared it would have a 
tendency to hold the price of local oil down And 
this is just what is likely to occur. It is known the 
Standard is trying to sell Kern River oil in Los An- 
geles, and has made several contracts, but so far as 
known no cut in the prices has been made. The fact 
remains, however, that local producers feel that this 
is a club held over their heads and that dollar oil is 
still a long way off. The Standard can deliver Kern 
River oil in Los Angeles at 75 ceDts per barrel and 
make money. As they have about 4,ooo,coo barrels 
in storage and contracts to buy as much as they 
wa"t at pricef from 15 to 12 cents, it is plain they can 
control the market in Los Angeles, and whatever 
price they establish here for their oil will be the 
price for local oil. Thus it is seen the Standard is 
gradually in one way and another, securing control 
of the oil business in California, which is no doubt 
its ultimate purpose. Notwithstanding this inevi- 
table result, a better feeling prevails throughout the 
entire state in connection with the oil business, and 
aside from the activity in already developed fields, 
there is considerable propectwork going on in differ- 
ent sections, and still mere contemplated. Prospect- 
ing is at present carried on most extensively in Ven- 
tura and Santa Barbara counties and in several of 
the northern counties. In Santa Barbara county, in 
what is known as the Santa Maria field, the pros- 
pects are brightest for successful results. Indeed, 
as is known, several sections of the field are developed 
and there are now hundreds of acres that are abso- 
lutely proved territory. The new well recently 
brought in by the Union Oil company about four 
miles north of Lompoc proves up about three miles of 
territory as oil land. All the land in this district for 
a diitanceof about thirty miles northwest and south- 
east and probably three or four miles wide has been 



taken up and a number of concerns are only holding 
off to ascertain the results in wells now drilling. 

The Central Oil company of Whittier at a meeting 
held last Tuesday declared a dividend payable in 
January of \% per ceut. During the past year with 
oil at 50 cents per barrel, and while running five 
strings of tools on development work, paid 7 per cent 
dividends. The coming year the officers expect to 
pay 12 per cent.— Los Angeles Herald. 



Sunset Letter. 



Bakersfiem>, Cai,., Dec. 23, 1903. 

The trouble between the Santa Fe and the Cali- 
fornia Consolidated Oil Fields company over the 
right-of-way across the forty acres north of the Ala- 
meda is still apparently unsettled. The grading has 
been completely torn up on this property and three 
or four armed guards are patroling it night and day, 
a house for their occupancy standing directly on the 
route which the railroad had Intended to follow. 
Right-of-way E. T. Henderson of the Santa Fe has 
been here several times in an effort to settle the dis- 
pute but from appearances he seems to have had 
little success, although neither side has a word to 
say regarding the progress of negotiations. 

The California Consolidated Oil Fields company is 
the great corporation backed by French capital re- 
cently organized by Jewett & Blodget of this city 
and which controls about three- fourths of the Sun- 
set field. 

The property which the Santa Fe desires to cross 
belongs to it or to one of i's subordinate corporations. 
A peculiar circumstance of the controversy is the 
fact that H. A. Blodget, general manager of the oil 
company, is also a director of the Sunset railroad 
company, the subordinate corporation of the Santa 
Fe that nominally owns the extension which is be- 
ing opposed. 

The outcome of the trouble is being watched with 
much interest. The oil men of the Sunset district 
strove for years in vain to obtain an extension 
through the field until the Spreckels-Crocker-Wool- 
worth bank people bought an interest in the Mon- 
arch property and threaten, it is said, to finance the 
Midland-Pacific to the coast if the extension was 
not built. Then the extension came. While the 
present controversy may delay it is not expected to 
stop the work in progress. 

The striking of oil by the Areata is likely to be 
followed by work on other lauds located on what has 
generally been considered the divide between the 
Sunset and Midway districts. The Areata has fully 
demonstrated that it is only necessary to go to a 
greater depth to get plenty of oil here. 

So far nothing has been done towards laying the 
pipe on the great pipe line of the California Con- 
solidated Oil Fields company to the Midway district 
although most of the material is on the ground. 
Some essential parts have been delayed in arriving 
and until these come work is snspened. The repre- 
sentatives of the company in this city say that work 
will probably ba started in February and completed 
before the end of that month. 

A. R. HINTON. 



Coalinga Oil News Is No More. 



George Ehle, who has been publishing the 
Coallnga Oil News, has suspended the pub- 
lication of his paper since the recent fire in 
Coallnga, when his subscription list and per- 
sonal effects were burned, and states that he 
will not renew its publication. 



Pacific Oil Reporter is $2.50 per year. 



READING 



( IRON ) 



Drive Pipe = = Casing = = Tubing = = Line Pipe 



IS THE BEST 



RH HFTDDrHVI C*C\ 509 MISSION STREET 

. fl. nCKKUrN UU. 8AN FRAN cisco, cal. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Petroleum In New Mexico. 



In his annual report to the Secretary of 
the Interior the Governor of New Mexico 
makes the following statement with regard 
to petroleum in the tern: 

"Colfax County. — Petroleum indications 
abound, especially In the vicinity of Raton, 
and work on one oil well is in progress. On 
the south side of the Raton and Cbico Rico 
mesas is a large area of plain, rolling coun- 
try, abounding In coal seams, the geological 
associations of which are most favorable for 
the presence of oil. This s one of the lo- 
calities which is now being exploited. Some 
16,000 acres have been acquired and a well 
drilled to 2,640 feet, when just as the indi- 
cations were most favorable, the well, which 
had not been cased, began to cave in and 
had to be abandoned. A new well was be- 
gun five miles south from this first well, and 
at about 1,600 feet the boring got out of line 
and the drilling to.ils were stuck. This bor- 
ing, too, had to be abandoned. A third hole 
Is now being drilled, and on July 26, 1903, It 
was down over 1,700 feet. It is cased all 
the way down, and artesian water bas been 
struck in several strata. Oil in considerable 
quantity has also been found, and the gas 
flow has been so strong as to ignite upon 
several occasions, necessitating great care in 
operating so as not to burn the derrick. 

"The drill is in the sandstone formation 
that overlies the oil basins in the Florence 
(.Col.) district. The oil found thus far is the 
most valuable of all oils, the heavy green 
paraffine oil that sells from $3 to $5 per 
barrel, as against 15 to 30 cents for the pro- 
ducts of the Beaumont and California wells. 
Experts from both California and Colorado 
have predicted great results from this oil 
field, and the instant that the well being 
bored at present breaks into the oil basin 
there will be a boom at Raton to rival that 
of Beaumont. 

"The table land consists of sandstone and 
shales of the base of the Laramie cretaceous 
and upper portions of the Montana, ridges 
being formed by volcanic lava dikes, hav- 
ing usually a northeast and southwest di- 
rection, and which more or less exist in the 
whole region. The entire plain country con- 
stituting the oil field is underlaid with drab- 
colored shales of the Montana and Colorado 
cretaceous groups. The sandstone strata 
constituting the seat of the oil are 3,000 to 
4,000 feet below the surface. The basaltic 
dikes on the surface are thoroughly Impreg- 
nated with oil and ha-ve their cavities and 
stream holes filled with dark green oil, seep- 
ages and oil springs occurring at numerous 
points in the field, indicating a large under- 
lying oil strata rather than a single spring. 
There also exists at many points sandstone 
and shale charged with oil or bituminous 
matter, so that they will burn. Shallow and 
deep wells of natural gas exist. These have 
been observed ever since the coming of the 
railroad, especially on the McCowan ranch, 
where a man digging a well Ignited the gas 
in the well and was severely burned. At 
Barela and at Trinchera oil well drilling 
outfits have been at work. There the rock 
Is In places so saturated with petroleum 
that when broken the oil drips from it like 
water from a spring. Good indications of 
oil are also found six miles southeast of 
Springer. The rocks at that place when 
broken are found to be full of oil cells from 
which the oil drops. This is a natural gas 
basin, and will no doubt be a producer of 
petroleum at no distant day. 



D Juan County. — Although the oil ex- 
citement is and has been at a fever that all 
over Colorado, Texas and New Mexico, San 
Juan county, on account of its isolated posi- 
tion, has not been pushing to the front in 
that respect, although it is in the center of 
wnat is pronounced one of the greatest oil 
basins in the southwest, members of the 
United States Geological Survey, a.- well as 
Professors Lake and Hayden, authorities on 
the subject, pronounce the oil indications of 
San Juan county as especially promising. 
A number of companies have been organ- 
ized for the development of the oil, and two 
companies have been drilling wells In differ- 
ent parts of the county, while at Farmlngton 
more development work has been done than 
at any other point. But thus far. only a 
depth of from 300 to 400 feet has been 
reached, owing to the lack of proper ma- 
chinery. The coming of railroads will un- 
doubtedly put San Juan county in line as 
an oil producer. The San Juan county oil 
fields, as far as explored, cover about 100,- 
000 acres, of which 60,000 acres have been 
filed upon. But many of the filings have 
lapsed or will soon lapse because their 
owners have failed to do the development 
work required by law. The oil that comes 
to the surface has 18 per cent of Illuminating 
power. The largest oil holdings are several 
thousand acres, choice land, held by a Cali- 
fornia syndicate, which is successfully oper- 
ating in .several western oil districts, and 
which has great confidence that San Juan 
county will be a big oil prcducer. 

"McKinley County. — In the western part 
of this county the oil Indications are so 
promising that at Mannelito a well is being 
drilled at the present time. The Immense 
supply of fuel marks McKinley for a future 
industrial center. The raw material for 
many industries can be supplied by the ad- 
joining counties, and with new railroad lines 
and the building of storage reservoirs the 
county will become one of the most pros- 
perous and richest sub-divisions of New 
Mexico." 



Can Not Build Pipe Lines. 



No pipe lines will be built in the Osage 
reservation in Oklahoma territory, at least 
for the present, says the Derrick. The de- 
cision of the Secretary of the Interior, Ethan 
Allen Hitchcock, is against the extension of 
all such privileges. The secretary declares 
as his opinion that his department has no 
right to authorize the laying of lines in the 
Indian territory, and only so far in the Osage 
reservation as applicants may acquire such 
right as subleases either from the original 
lessee or by being actually interested or 
identified with, as part owners of the rights 
of the sub-leases acquired from the original 
lessee, satisfactory proof of bona fide inter- 
est or ownership to be submitted to the de- 



partment." IL. 

The department holds that the right to 
construct and operate pipe lines is given In 
substantially the same terms as the right to 
mine oil. The construction of the pipe line 
or lines seems necessary, in the opinion of 
the secretary, to the successful mining oper- 
ations under the lease. The department has 
held that right of assignment of mining 
privileges under the lease, should be recog- 
nized, such assignments being subject to ap- 
proval by the department as the original 
lease was. The right to assign or sub let a 
pipe line constructed under the provisions 
of said lease also should be recognized. 
Any such transfer would, of course, bdsub- 
ject to approval by the department. 

Wanted. 



Some tiSg-inch casing. Must be in good 
condition and cheap for cash. 

J. E. KERR, 
Rialto Bldg., San Francisco. 
Continued from Page Seyen 
may solve the difficulty. 

The Nevada County Company, 30-28-28, 
has resumed after a suspension of some time 
ane is drilling its fifteenth well. The Black 
Jack on 4-29-28 has also resumed work. 

The Columbian on 29-28-28 is engaged in 
drilling five new wells on its property and is 
now on the second of these. 

The Monte Cristo recently issued a cir- 
cular to its stockholders stating that owing 
to the fact that the Standard is not taking its 
usual amount of oil at present, the company 
will not be able to pay dividends as usual. 
The indications are this will be onlo tem- 
porary. 

A decision has been recently rendered by 
the Supreme Court of the state which is of 
much interest to oil men. By its terms the 
Court in effect hoids that in locating a sec- 
tion of oil land the lines of the government 
survey are to be followed regardless of the 
fact that a part of it may be left outside of 
the location stakes placed on the claim or 
that the same may be in excess of the 160 
acres allowed to a section. 

The decision is in the case of Mrs. J. M. 
Crawford versus the Kern County Oil 
Company, and is by Judge Cooper, the 
commissioner of tee court. It is brief and 
does not enter into details as to findings of 
law. An application is being prepared for a 
re-hearlng. 

The property immediately Involved is 
three acres on section 32-28-28 in the Kern 
River field, all of which was by mistake left 
outside of the location stakes set by the 
original locators from whom the Kern claims 
title and part of which is in excess of the 160 
acres usually alloted to a section, but all of 
it is within the lines of the government sur- 
vey. J. M. Crawford located the tract and 
the litigation began and was carried by his 
widow through the courts. The Superior 
Court of Kern County found in her favor, 
but this now reversed. The decision will 
aflect a number of oil properties if allowed 
to stand. 

A. R. HINTON. 




BATES' 

PATENT CASING TONGS 



1416-1426 19th St., Rakersfield, Cal. 



Fills a long-felt want. No more need of 
pole and rope for screwing up casing. Bates 
Tongs can be applied to the casing anywhere 
in driving or pulling without danger of injury 
or parting casing. 

Set No. 1, with any two size jaws from gYn 
to i$y 2 Inches. 

Set No. 2, with any two size jaws from 
9J8 inches. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



Private Rooms 



Phone Main 5966 



Jules Wittmann 



Jules' Restaurant 



Regular Dinner with wine, 75c. 
Sundays and Holidays, $1.00. 



315 317-319=321-323 
Pine St,. S. F. 



Open Evenings 
Music Sundays 




FOR SALE 



IN 

KERN RIVER, Cheap 

Section 2, 29-28. 

Shaded portion map shows 40 acres three-fourths mile east of 
DISCOVERY WELL. U. S. Patent 22 years. EASY TERMS. 
Cheapest in Kern River. Write at once. 

WESTERN R. 1. CO., 

Room 36 Chronicle BIdg., 

San Francisco. 



PROMOTERS 



Do you desire to sell stock in your gold, copper, 
mining, oil and other industrial companies ? It so, 
you cannot find a better advertising medium than 

The Dixie Manufacturer 

Birmingham, Alabama. 

It is the leading industrial and finadcinl paper published in the South. 
It reaches that class of readers who are Interested in Financial and 
Industrial Affairs. Its readeas are those who have money for invest- 
ment and answer advertisements. Some of the larges f companies in the 
United States have advertised in its columns and found it profitable. 
Why not you ? 

The Dixie Manufacturer is published semi-monthly. It is old and 
established. GUARANTEED CIRCULATION 10,000. Subscrip- 
tion price $2.00 per year Advertising rates 10 cents per agate line, 14 
lines to the inch, per issue. Try an ad. Send for Sample copy. Address 

Rountree Publishing Co, 

Birmingham, Alabama. 





j MAY BB HAD AS FOLLOWS: 

Prom Nov. 1, 1899, to Nov. z, 1900 $6.00 

Prom Nov. z, 1900, to Nov. z, 1901 6.00 

From Nov. z, Z90Z, to Nov. z, 190a 5.00 


Bound Volumes 

of the 

Pacific 

Oil 

Reporter 


These volumes are strengly and 
artistically bonnd, and contain 
the only full and correct informa- 
tion as to the development of the 
oil industry on the Pacific coast. 


Editorial and Publishing Office 

318 Pine Street 
San Francisco, - Cal. j 





ALL" 



the oil news 
our motto 



We have active correspondents in 
each field who send us all the 
news of interest. 



THE 



Pacific Oil Reporter 



is the only 
OIL JOURNAL 
Published on the 
Pacific Coast. 

It gives full, fresh and authentic oil news from 
all the oil districts, new and old. It exposes 
fraudulent oil companies. It gives the latest 
information on oil stocks and dividends. It 
describes the latest method of drilling wells, 
pumping, piping and storing oil; use of oil for 
road making, etc. 

It is the only paper which advocates the belief 
that California's refined asphalt is the equal 
of Trinidad asphalt for paving and other pur- 
poses, and is in every way superior to bitumi- 
nous rock, the use of which has given San 
Francisco, Oakland and other California cities 
so many poor streets. 

The subscription price is $2.50 a year. If you 
are interested in any way In California oil, cut 
out the following coupon, fill in the blank lines, 
and send it, accompanied by check, money 
order or express order to the 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine St. San Francisco 



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at $ 



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Address 



Date 



PACIFIC OIL RBKORTBR 



13 



THE NATIONAL SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

Oil Well Supplies 
Drilling and 
Fishing Tools 

Fitler Cables==best in the world 

We carry In stock heavy 7£$-ln., 5f4-' n - an d 
4',2-in. Boston Casing, in addition to all the 
standard sizes and weights. 6-in., 8-ln. and 
io-ln. Boston Drive Pipe always on hand. 

Pacific Coast Headquarters 

117 North Main Street 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Branches: 

Bakersfield and McKlttrlck, Cal. 



The New 
"Up=to=Date" 



MAPS 



issued by the 
well known 
map makers 



BARLOW & HILL 



will be for sale by the 

Pacific Oil Reporter 

318 Pine St., San Francisco. 



Place your orders early 



Half Moon Bay 



Two year* ago, we advised " Watch Halfmcon Bay." We 
predicted the great strike far in advance. High grade oil, 
paraffine base, cheapest transportation, foretold the future of 
this wonderful field. Our predictions have been fully verified. 
We now predict that Halfmoon Bay stocks will sell within a 
year at ten times their present price. 

The gusher on the Fountain Oil Company's lease is the 
most valuable well In the state of California. Other gushers 
are drilling and still others will soon be commenced. 

No treasury stock of the Fountain Oil Company has been 
offered in the last two years. We can supply a limited amount 
at $i.oo per share. 

We advise the purchase of Wisconsin Gold Bond Oil, 
(well down 1600 feet.) A few shares can be had at 50 cents. 
American Duchess oil, (very extensive Halfmoon Bay hold- 
ings, adjoining Fountain), shares selling at 50 cents. A new 
company is forming, has secured lands with well nearly com- 
pleted, within 400 feet of the gusher. 

Wire your order or write us for information. 

DEBENTURE SURETY CO. 

Rialto Bldg., San Francisco. 



A BUSINESS PROPOSITION 



We all seek the most comforts In 
this life at the minimum expenditure 
of labor or cash. If you are going 
East you will find the 

UNION PACIFIC 

ahead of all others on the above 
basis. At the same time you reach 
your destination quicker. 
Drop me a postal and I will call and 
explain everything. 



S. F. BOOTH, 

General Agent U. P. R. R. Co. 
No. I Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 



»4 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



California Stock and Oil 
Exchange. 

The following were the stock sales in 
the California Stock and Oil Exchange 
in the formal sessions held for the week 
ending Wednesday, December 33rd. 

APOLLO. 

1,000 at 43 J 430 00 

ASSOCIATED OIL CO. 

a,6ooat 19 474 °° 

CARIBOU. . 

200 at 140 28000 

*coat 115 23000 

7 at 1 10 7 7" 

CLAIRMONT. 

3,oooat 30 90000 

500 at 32. ., 160 03 

FOUR. 

I,8ooat 67 1,20600 

HANFORD. 

1 at 140 00 140 00 

HOME OIL. 

400 at 97 J£ 39000 

1,400 at 1 00 1,400 00 

200 at- 10?%. 20500 

INDEPENDENCE. 

500 at 15 75 00 

JUNCTION. 

250 at IS 37 5° 

1,000 at 18 18000 

MARICOPA. 

3, 150 at 10 3 15 00 

MONARCH. 

200 at 42 8400 

500 at 40 200 00 

MONTE CRISTO. 

600 at 60 36° 00 

100 at 63 . 6300 

NEVADA CO. 

500 at 39 , i?S 00 

OCCIDENTAL OIL. 

r,ooo at 17 17000 

j.ooo at 18 18000 

OIL CITY PETROLEUM. 

1,000 at 26 26000 

SOVEREIGN. 

100 at 38 3800 

500 at 40 . 20000 

STERLING. 

500 at 2 60 1,3°° 00 

Sooat 275 1,375 00 

TOLTEC 



500 at 19. , 
200 at 18. 



95 00 

36 00 

WEST SHORE. 
800 at 3 00 2,400 00 



24,208 Shares 



Amount, $13,384.70 



The monthly record of sales since 
January I, 1903, is as follows: 

Shares. Value. 

January 267,019 $255,202 

February 3«,443 219, 358 

March : 199, 908 151,982 

April 236,268 115,571 

May : 401,454 154,386 

June 154,720 117,928 

July 74,594 71.89° 

August 181,478 119,231 

September 146,123 74,455 

Stock Quotations. 

Following are the latest quotations for 
stocks of oil companies listed on the Cal- 
ifornia Stock and Oil Exchange : 

Oil Stocks. Bid. Asked. 

Alma 

Apollo 

Asso. Oil Co Stk. Tr. 

Certificates 17 .18 

Aztec 

Bay City 12 

Bear Flag. 

California Standard ... .07 , 

Caribou ." 135 

Central Point Con. 60 

Chicago Crude , .19 

Clairemont 35 

Esperanza 

Fauna 

Four 70 

Fulton 425 

Giant 

Hanford 135.00 14400 

Homestake 

Home 1.02J4 1.05 

Imperial 

Independence .15 

Junction 14 16 

Kern 4 75 4 IS 

Kern River 

Lion . .02 



Monarch of Arizona... .39 43 

Maricopa 

McKittrick 20 

Monte Crista 65 

Nevada £ 5 

Occidental of West Va 18 

Oil City Petroleum... . .24 .27 

Peerless 13 75 

Piedmont „ 

Petroleum Center . .05 

Pittsburg 

Reed Crude 

Reed Crude, New Issue 4-50 

S. F. & McKittrick 

San Joaquin O. & D. 

Section Seven . . 

Senator 62 ........ 

Shamrock 

Sovereign 37 -40 

Sterling 

Sunset (Or) .20 

Superior . .05 ,■ .07 

Teck 

Thirty-three 

Toltec 18 .19 

Twenty ■ eight. 

Union 

United Petroleum 

West Shore 

Western Petroleum 

Wolverine 



WANTED 



A man who will advance cash 
to put down one deep oil well on 
fifty acres of proven land, with 
two wells now pumping 30 grav- 
ity oil. Tools, engines boilers and 
casing on the property free from 
debts ; land patented. Will give 
a large interest in the property 
for the money advanced. 

Apply to 

A. D. EL WELL, 

605 Grant Bldg. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



TO THE EAST 

VIA 

SUNSET ROUTE 

Means a Trip Taken 

IN COMFORT 

Oiled Track==No Dust 
Oil=Burning Engines 
No Cinders 
No Frost-=No Snow 

SUNSET LIMITED 

San Francisco to New Orleans 

EVEBY DAY 

Dining car, meals a la carte 

Observation Car 

Vestlbuled Pullman Sleepers 
Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, 

El Paso, San Antonio, 

Houston, Beaumont and 

Texas Oil Fields. 

Southern Pacific 



W. A. BROPHY, 

914 Mutual Savings Bank Bldg., 

708 Market St., San Francisco. 
Telephone, Green 816. 

Petroleum Lands Examined and Re- 
ported on in all Parts of the United 
States. California a Specialty. 



4 *i 
Santa fe 

m w 



ALL THE WAY 

CHICAGO 
In 3 Days 



San Fran- 



Trains leave Union Ferry Depot, 
Cisco, as follows: 

A. M.— +BAKERSFIRLD LOCAt;Due 
Stockton 10:40 a. m., Fresno 2:40 p. m., 
Bakersfield 7:15 p. m. Stops at all points 
in San Joaquin Valley. Corresponding 
train arrives 8:55 a. m. 
A. M.— g"THE CALIFORNIA LIMIT- 
ED;" Due Stockton 12:01 p. m., Fresno 
3:20 p. m., Bakersfield 6:00 p. m., Kansas 
City 3rd day 2:35 a. m., Chicago 3rd day 
2:15 p. m. Palace Sleepers and Dining 
Car through to Chicago. No second class 
tickets honored on this train. Corres- 
ponding train arrives °ii:io p. m. 
A. M.— *VAI,I,EY LIMITED; Due 
Stockton 12:01 p. m., Fresno 3:20 p. m- 
Bakersfield 6:00 p. m. The fastest train 
in the Valley. Carries Composite and 
Reclining Chair Car. No second class 
tickets honored on this train. Corres- 
ponding train arrives 11:10 p. m. 
P. M.— * STOCKTON LOCAL I Due 
Stockton 7:10 p. m. Corresponding train 
arrives 11:10 a. m. 

P. m.— *OVERLAND EXPRESS ; Due 
Stockton 11:15 P- m -« Fresno 3:15 a. m. 
Bakersfield 7:35 a. m , Kansas City 4th 
day 7:00 a. m., Chicago 4th day 8:47 p. rn. 
Palace and Tourist Meepers and free Re- 
clining Chair Cars through to Chicago. 
Also Palace Sleeper which cuts out at 
Fresno. Corresponding train arrives 
6:25 p. m. 

g Mondays and Thursdays 
Tuesdays and Fridays. 
Personally Conducted Parties for Kansas 
City, Chicago and East leave on Overland Express 
Monday, Thursday and Saturday at 8:00 p. ra. 
Ticket Offices, 641 Market Street and in Ferry 
Depot, San Francisco; and 1112 Broadway 
Oakland. 



7:30 
9:30 

9:30 

4:00 
8:00 

* Daily 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 

Designs 

Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. HANDBOOK on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken throueh Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of any scientific journal. Terms, $3 a 
year ; four months, $1. Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN &Co. 36,Broad ^ New York 

Branch Office. 625 F St., Washington, D. C. 



J. 8. EWEN 

STOCKBROKER 

318 PINE STREET, Room 5 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Member California Stock and Oil Ex- 
change, and San Francisco and Tonopah 
Mining Fxchange. 

Telephone Main 1552. 



Stock, Bond and Investment Syndicate 

(Incorporated) 
Money Loaned on Stocks. 

Listed and Unlisted OH and Mining Stocks 
R. L. CHENEY, Secretary 
St4-5i5 Examiner Building 

San Francisco, California 



Delinquent Notice. 

HIGH GRAVITY OH, COMPANY. 
— Location of principal place of business, 
San Francisco. Location of works, Holje 
Ranch, San Mateo County, Cal. 

Notice. — There are delinquent upon 
the following described stock on account 
of Assessment No. 2 levied on the 18th 
day of November 1903, the several 
amounts set opposite the names of the 
respective shareholders, as follows : 
No. No. 

NAME Certificate Shares Amt. 

L. A. Frick 28 200 {20 

L. A. Frick 29 300 30 

F. W. Otten 45 100 10 

Tillie Otten 46 100 10 

Edward Llyd 48 100 10 

Lulu Hayer 49 50 5 

Jannie Marshall. .. .55 100 10 

Maud Alhborn 57 50 5 

W. C. Alhborn 59 50 5 

Jannie Marshall .. .61 100 10 

And in accordance with law and an or- 
der of the Board of Directors on the 
18th day of November, 1903 so many 
shares of each parcel of such stock fa 
may be necessary will be sold at public 
auction at the office of the company, 
423 Market St., San Francisco, Califor- 
nia, on the 13th day of January, 1904, at 
the hour of 10 o'clock A. M., of said day, 
to pav delinquent assessments thereon, 
together with cost of advertising and 
expenses of the sale. 

D. ROSENBLUM, 

Secretary. 

Office, 423 Market Street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 



LIGHTNING WELL MACHY 

STHE STANDARD, 
STFAM PUMPS AIR LIFTS, ifjT // 
GASOLINE ENGINES '^if^C 

WRITE FOR CIRCULAR 113 »'%*&" 

THE AMERICAN WELL WORKS G""^ 

AUR0RA.ILL- CHICAGO- DALLAS, TEX 



AMERICAN CONSOLIDATED 
Oil Company 

A. B. Butler, J. A. Chanslop, 



Vice President 



13.750 shares of stock for sale at 
8 cents per share — par value $1.00 

P. W. SPAULDING 

ATTORN EY-AT-LAW 

Evanston - Wyoming 

613 Market St., San Francisco. 



Companies Incorporated 

under the lienient laws of 

ARIZONA 

which has the broadest laws of any state. 
Companies can be organized to do busluess any 
where No personal liability. No limit on cap! 
talization. No State examination of books. No 
franchise tax. Stock can be made non-assessable 
and can be issued for services. 

Write for information and blanks to 

HUGH M. CBEIGHTON & CO. 

Phoenix, Arizona. 



Have You Securities 

that pay no dividends and you want 
some that do? If you want to buy, sell 
or exchange investment stocks, or if you 
want gilt-edge shares in operating com- 
panies, address the Debenture Surety 
Company, Rialto Bldg., San Francisco, 
which also incorporates, finances and 
operates good enterprises. 







PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 5. No. 9. 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAL.. SATURDAY, JANUARY 2. .903. 



Price, Ten Cents. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Pubii.h.d VmHi 

1 at OO Anthortly of the Pacific CouL 

IWontd Hj California P.trol.an. MtBaW Association 



MRS. MARIA ROSA WINN, Proprietor. 

B. s. hastman, 

Kdllor and Busiaeaa Manager 
Orrtca AMD Kditobial Room 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco, California 

Telephone, Bush 176. 

TBRMS 
On vsak $i 50 

9\X Mowths I 50 

Tmbbb Moittbb I OO 

St ioli Conn. IOC 

STRICTLY IN ADVA.NCK 

Upxkt should be ■cut by Postal Order, Draft >r Registered 
Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil Reporter, 318 Pine street San 
Francisco, rooms i>-3**33- Communications must beaccoruoauied 
by writer's name and address, not necessarily for publication, 
bat as a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered in the Poatofflce at Ban Francisco, California, as sec- 
ond class matter. 

NEW MINING BULLETIN. 

The last bulletin of the State Mining 
Bureau, published some two and one-half 
years ago — a monograph by Prof. W. L. 
Watts, dealing with the geology of the Cali- 
fornia oil fields — was a very valuable work 
and attracted much attention. The many 
changes, due to the passage of time, has 
made a new bulletin necessary, and State 
Mineralogist Anbury thinks that the oil in- 
dustry has now become established firmly 
enough that much good can be done by a 
bulletin relating to the uses of oil rather 
than the production. It is planned that the 
bulletin be issued in April or May next, in 
time for distribution at the St. Louis Exposi- 
tion. It will be edited by Mr. Paul W. 
Prutzman, who, as stated elsuwhere in this 
edition, has recently made an extended trip 
studying the various fields in the state. The 
contents of the bulletin in general will be 
maps and brief descriptions of all the produc- 
ing fields with statistics as to producing, 
abandoned and drilling wells, production, 
etc., chapters descriptive of the various kinds 
of crude oil produced in California, and of 
the chemistry of California petroleum, refin- 
ing and refining products, and of the uses of 
crude oil for fuel, road making and other 
purposes, and the uses and values of refined 
products. Mr. Prutzman has made a very 
complete collection of oil samples from all 
parts of the state, which he will have anal- 
yzed and the samples with analyses will be 
on exhibition at St. Louis, and the various 
analyses published in full in the bulletin. 
The value of a work of this kind is incalcu- 
lable and the well known qualifications of 
the author will insure its being of the great- 
est interest to every person interested in the 
oil industry of the state. 

Mr. Prutzman has devoted his almost ex- 
clusive attention to the study of the Cali- 
fornia oil fields for the past three or four 
years and has written exhaustively on them, 
some of his articles haivng attracted wide 
attention. He is also an expert oil and as- 
phalt chemist. The Reporter expects to 
have the pleasure of publishing various ad- 
vance articles previous to the publication of 
the bulletin. 



The Coalinga Field. 

Production for Year 1903, 2,075,000 Barrels ; No. of Producing Wells, 115; 
No. New Wells Brought in, 1903, 46 ; No. Wells Drilling, 30. 



The past year has been one of great pros- 
perity for this field. No other oil field in the 
state has witnessed greater activity or had so 
many favorable contributory elements com- 
bining to bring it into prominence. The ad- 
vent of the Standard Oil company early in 
the year did more than any other- one thing 
to establish public confidence in this field 
and give it the prominence which Its merits 
deserved. Hitherto it had received merely 
nominal recognition among oil men gener- 
ally. It was known and admitted that Coal- 
inga produced a large quantity of oil of a 
high grade, but it was not generally con- 
ceded that the productive area was very ex- 
tensive. Even Coalinga oil men have been 
amazed at the remarkable developments wit- 
nessed in that field since the year 1903 
began. There were men operating in 
the field less than two years ago who 
would not admit that oil would ever be 
found where today wells are gushing forth 
hundreds of barrels dally. Take section 28- 
19-15 for instance. The past year has de- 
veloped wonderful surprises on that famous 
section, the oldest part of the field. When 
the first wells were sunk there a few years 
ago It was supposed that the first oil sand 
was the only one to be found and wells were 
finished up as soon as it was touched, fear- 
ing to go deeper lest salt water or some other 
serious obstacle would be encountered. The 
territory was easy drilling and a well that 
produced 50 barrels of oil a day was consid- 
ered good enough for anybody. Witness the 
change the past year has wrought. Instead 
of one stratum of productive oil sand three 
are now known to exist, each producing a 
different gravity of oil, aggregating a depth 
of several hundred feet, and wells are now 
being developed producing as high as 1500 
barrels of oil a day. 

The conditions here found are not dupli- 
cated in any other oil field in the world. As 
just stated, a single well can be made to pro- 
duce any one of three different grades of oil. 
Contrary to the general rule where different 
strata are found, the lower stratum here pro- 
duces the heaviest oil. The wells of the 
California Oilfields, Limited, are a notable 
illustration of this remarkable condition and 
afford an interesting study for those engaged 
in the production of oil. 

The developments in the western part of 
the field have been no less surprising. The 
wells of the Commercial Petroleum company 
on section 32-19-15, yielding 200 and 300 bar- 
rels of 21 gravity oil per day in close prox- 
imity to wells that were producing less than 
100 barrels a day of 17 gravity oil, was an- 
other surprise that has served to point out 
the possibilities of this remarkable field. 

But perhaps the greatest strike of the year 



was the great wells of the Section Seven Oi 
company, in the northwest corner of section 
7-20-15. It was generally conceded that if 
oil was found in that locality at all it would 
be found in large quantity, but when well 
No. 1 of that company was developed and 
began spouting 2,000 barrels of oil a day and 
then gradually increased until it reached 
the 3,000-barrel mark, the whole state was 
amazed, and the possibilities of the Coalinga 
field began to be seriously sonsldered by men 
interested in the oil industry everywhere. 

The Standard found itself unprepared to 
handle such a production, with the result 
that many thousands of barrels of oil went to 
waste from this well. That the well is not 
a mere "gasser" is proven by the fact that 
during the month of November 45,000 bar- 
rels of oil were delivered to the Standard 
from this well. No. 2 well, recently com- 
pleted, is proving equally productive. 

So rapi >ly has this district developed dur- 
ing the year that even before the Standard 
Oil company could get its branch pipe line 
built into the field, a line only intended to 
serve as a feeder for the main line to Kern 
River, to carry just enough light oil to flush 
the heavy Bakersfield product through the 
line, the production reached a volume that 
warranted the Standard company in closing 
down the Bakersfield end entirely, and now 
there is already talk, emanating without 
doubt from an authoritative source, of a sec» 
ond line Into the Coalinga field. 

If the present rate of development is kept 
up through the coming year the production 
of the field will be more than doubled, which 
would tax the railroad and the pipe line to 
their limit to handle. 

The conditions in Coalinga are different 
from any other field in the state and are 
such as to stimulate development to the ut- 
most. Producing as it does both a heavy 
and the lighter oils the product finds a ready 
buyer in the Standard and Union Oil com- 
panies for the refining oils and the Southern 
Pacific railroad for the heavy product. 

During the year two of Kern River's most 
prominent and progressive oil men have 
entered the Coalinga field, namely John M- 
Wright and John A. Bunting, and already 
they are manifesting themselves in a way 
that shows that they are keenly alive to the 
opportunities and possibilities of their new 
field of operations. Elsewhere in this issue 
mention is made of Mr. Bunting's most re- 
cent acquisition of rich oil territory. 

As already intimated the outlook for the 
field is decidedly bright. In fact it is but 
repeating what is in everybody's mouth 
when we say that in no other field in the 
state is the outlook anywhere near as bright 
as it Is in the Coalinga field. To the west 



4 

and south is the trend of active operations 
and it need not be a surprise to witness the 
coming year the development of an immense 
oil field south of the railroad. Already oper- 
ations have begun south of the town by men 
whose very names are synonyms for success. 
The formation indicates oil and the men 
who are undertaking this extension are en- 
thusiastic in their expectations. At present 
there are about 115 producing wells in the 
field and thirty strings of tools are running. 
The following table, obtained from an au- 
thoritative source, gives the production of 
the field by months for the year: 

Barrels. 

January 4 6 >5°° 

February 42,000 

March 46,500 

April 90,000 

May 133.000 

June 221,000 

July 212,000 

August 248,000 

September 267,000 

October 259,000 

November 250,000 

December (.Estimated) 260,000 

Total 2,075,000 

U. M. THOMAS. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



Oil As Smelter Fuel. 



It will be but a few years when oil will be 
the common smelter fuel. If we had not 
strayed from the old ruts of metallurgy we 
would still be reducing our ores with wood. 
But as wood was given up for charcoal as we 
passed from charcoal to coal, and from coal 
to coke, so coke must be superseded by oil. 
The latter is the ideal smelting fuel. In cer- 
tain dry and arid sections of the country 
good mines are in idleness today because, 
first, they cannot obtain sufficient water to 
carry out the ordinary stamp mill process ; 
and, second because smelters cannot be 
profitably operated in their locality owing to 
the great cost of coke. Oil, however, can be 
delivered to these points at a comparatively 
low cost, and this fact in itself will ultimately 
result in placing many properties an a pay- 
ing basis which are today, impossible to ope- 
rate at a profit. Oil will do for the mining 
Industry what electricity has done for city 
transportation, in substituting the under- 
ground trolley for the bobbing horse-car of 
ten years ago. 

Petroleum In Alaska. 



RETROSPECT AND PROSPECT. 



According to James Casey, of Seattle, an 
old explorer and pathfinder, Alaska will soon 
come to the front as an oil producer. Mr. 
Casey, who is now in New York, says that 
the oil rock formation extends 3,000 miles 
along the Alaskan coast, that he has dipped 
petroleum from depressions in the ground, 
and that it is of a quality easily treated to 
produce illuminant. He wishes to " go on 
record with the prophecy that the oil produc- 
tion of Alaska within the next five years 
will exceed in value the entire output of 
gold up to this time, together with that of 
the furs and fishery products." Alaska is a 
region of surprises in the way of successively 
disclosing new resources, and undoubtedly 
is destined to great development as a wealth 
producer. There are no Americans now 
who would willingly part with " Seward's 
iceberg." 

Pacific Oil Reporter $2.50 per year. 



We print in this issue a resume of the past 
year's operations in some of the leading oil 
districts of the state, together with observa- 
tions of a general nature on some of the 
minor fields. Generally speaking, the year 
has been a prosperous one for the oil indus- 
try in California. No new fields have been 
discovered, but enlargements and extensions 
have been made in the Fresno and Santa 
Barbara fields. The striking of the Pinal 
gusher marked an epoch In the Santa Maria 
district, while a no less remarkable strike 
was made in the Section Seven well in the 
Coalinga district. These two remarkable 
wells have served to attract more than local 
attention, and have gone a long way towards 
advertising the productiveness of the Cali- 
fornia petroleum fields abroad. 

The enterprise of greatest magnitude that 
has been accomplished during the year has 
been the building of the great Standard pipe 
line to Bakersfield and Coalinga. This pipe 
line is the greatest of its kind in the world, 
and the construction of it was watched with 
the keenest interest by every one. There 



as a starter, a wooden Indian can pretty 
nearly figure the thing out, so they say. 

Then again, the building of the pipe line 
to Kern River'is claimed by some other wise 
ones to have been only for the purpose of 
bringing the railroads to the Standard's terms 
on the question of oil transportation. If this 
is true it is not_the first time the Standard 
has made that game work, as others besides 
Ida M. Tarbell well know. At any rate the 
railroads and the Standard Oil Company 
seem to be at sweet peace with each other. 
The Standard gets all the cars it wants while 
the independents are told that there is a 
"shortage." 

Whatever the game is, the public is 
allowed to believe the Kern River line is a 
failure, while the independent producer in 
that field is wondering what will happen 
next. 

That the Standard and the Southern Pa- 
cific railroad will eventually own the Cali- 
fornia oil fields is generally conceded, but 
that the building of the great pipe line was 
to bring this about in so short a time, is 
something of a surprise to even the '"wise 
men." 




First Oil Well in Uinta Co., Wyoming. 



were those who said when it was building 
that it would be a failure, and now 
that it has been completed and tested, 
there is even more uncertainty about 
the real success of it than ever. 
That it is a success so far as the Coal- 
inga product is concerned, is generally con- 
ceded, but with regard to the Kern River 
product there is a diversity of opinion, the 
general consensus being that it cannot carry 
the heavy fuel oil of the Kern county fields. 
There are wise ones, however, who say 
that the abandonment of the Kern River part 
of the line Is only temporary, and is a 
scheme to discourage Kern River indepen- 
dent producers, with the double object in 
view of lowering the price of fuel oil to the 
enrichment of the Standard Oil Company 
and its ally, the Southern Pacific railroad, 
and to enable the latter to buy up 
the Independent companies in the field 
at its own price. That the railroad com- 
pany Is negotiating for the purchase of 
some of the companies which are not in the 
combine Is an open secret. That it practi- 
cally controls the Associated (the combine) 
s also a well-known fact, With these facts 



With these facts and conditions staring 
them in the face, the independent oil pro- 
ducers of the State are a little perplexed at 
the opening of the new year. Especially is 
this true of the fuel oil producers in the 
great Kern county fields. With an over-pro- 
duction, a depressed market, and the seem- 
ing' indifference of the Standard Oil Company 
and the railroads to the general welfare of 
the industry, a season of general depression 
and Inactivity may be expected in the fuel 
oil districts. 

• With respect to the refining oil districts, 
the very opposite seems to be true. The 
decline in production in the Eastern fields 
has already served to stimulate the search 
for and and development of the lighter oils. 
The result of this stimulus is seen in the 
Santa Barbara and Fresno county fields, as 
above noted. 



We manufacture the best 
lubricating oils for oil 
drillers 

KING KEYSTONE OIL, CO., 
116 Front St., San Francisco. 



PACIPIC OIL REPORTER 



The Half Moon Bay Field. 

Quantity Appears at Last to Have Been Attained Where Quality Was 

Long known to Exist. 



Although often referred to of late, as a 
"new field," by reason of the fact that it has 
recently acquired considerable additional 
prominence, the Halfmoon Bay district has, 
as a matter of fact, been under development 
for some years. The production from the 
wells of this locality averaged very moderate 
amounts throughout the greater portion of 
the field's history, up to recent months, and 
It was only by the bringing in of what is 
known as the Independent gusher, less than 
a month earlier than date of this Issue, that 
the district became known to the world as 
the only large producer situated within 
reach of the city of San Francisco, as well as 
the only locality in the State of California, 
where oil of similar character can be found. 



the most part very shallow. Oil and ga* 
was struck, but the former never in large 
quantities and, finally, the field was aban- 
doned by this company. However, unsuc- 
cessful their operations may have seemed to 
themselves, the Pacific Coast Oil company's 
drillers proved the character of oil to be 
found In this field and paved the way for 
the more successful operators who were to 
follow. 

Some two years ago, the firm of Culber- 
son, Sallee and Hayne renewed the oper- 
ations in Purissima canyon and have since 
been drilling wells there with considerable 
success. The wells which they have drilled, 
have, in the majority of instances, reached 
only shallow depth, but they have pro- 



was immediately decided to put down sev- 
eral more wells In the vicinity and Tunitas 
creek and the Halfmoon Bay district will 
undoubtedly see much greater activity in 
the Immediate future than ever before. 

Among the operating companies located 
In the Halfmoon Bay field the are American 




J. E. KERR. 



Duchess, the Wisconsin, the Fountain, the 
Paxton, the High Gravity and the Pilarcitas. 
The Wisconsin Gold Bond Oil company 
has been a producer in this district for some 
time, but is now going deeper with its well 
which is down about 1,600 feet. The Pax- 
ton and High Gravity companies are simi- 




Scene in the Coalinga Field. 



Halfmoon Bay Is strictly a high-grade oil 
section. Its product is of too great value for 
use as fuel, and it Is in no competition with 
the asphaltum oil. The demand for refining 
purposes cannot be exhausted, and it is 
largely due to the knowledga of this, that 
oil operators have persisted in their en- 
deavors to increase the field's output, and 
have fought for years, to overcome the ob- 
stacles in their path to success. 

The location of this field is in that part of 
San Mateo county, which borders upon the 
bay from which the district derives its 
name. The transportation facilities enjoyed 
by the operators in this locality are, by long 
odds, the finest in the state. Situated but 
forty miles from San Francisco and but two 
miles from the ocean at an elevation of 800 
feet, the opportunities for the cheapest 
kind of transportation are excellent. 

The earlier history of Halfmoon Bay from 
an oil standpoint is more or less well known. 
More than eleven years ago, the Pacific 
Coait Oil company entered this field and 
conducted extensive work in the Purrissima 
canyon. The wells which this company 
sunk were of varying depths, but were for 



duced fair quantities of oil which is better 
than 50 and is sold for about $2.00 per bar- 
rel at the well. This oil is taken by the 
Knapp refinery and from it is produced a 
variety of the most valuable refined pro- 
duets. 

In Tunitas canyon is situated the well 
which recently became known as the Inde- 
pendent gusher. The reports of this strike 
were published in previous issues of the 
Pacific Oii, Reporter. The discovery was 
accepted as a most notable one In that it 
brings the productive oil belt of the state 
north almost to the limits of the city of San 
Francisco. The well itself is a very valu- 
able one and occupies a distinctive position 
as the only gusher of high-grade oil in the 
State of California. The strike was made at 
a depth of 850 feet, the oil and gas gushing 
over the casing, igniting and causing a ter- 
rific explosion, on the night of December 
4th. The well was capped and remained so 
awaiting the repair of the damage. It was 
uncapped on Monday last for a short time 
and the oil shot above the derrick until 
again shut off. 

Following the news of this discovery, if 



larly situated and the others mentioned are 
reported to have several new wells about to 
be commenced. 

Among the operators in this field who 
have been persistently at work for many 
months Is Mr. J. E. Kerr, who has for the 
past two years been conducting drilling 
operations and has many times assetred his 
faith that this field would with development 
become a great producer of high-grade oil 
and would maintain some of the most valu- 
able wells to be found anywhere in the 
world. The Tunitas canyon operations have 
been almost entirely under the direction of 
Mr. Kerr and his associates who have in- 
vested a. large amount of capital in this field. 



Remember that our subscription rate is 
only $2.50 per year, for which we give the 
latest news from all the fields. 

Wanted. 



Some 1156-inch casing. Must be in good 
condition and cheap for cash. 

J. E. KERR, 
Rialto Bldg., San Francisco. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Review of the Oil Industry. 

Report of Paul W. Prutzman, Oil Expert of the State Mining Bureau 

of California. 



Mr. Prutzman has just returned from a 
month's trip through the oil fields, where tie 
was engaged in making a general survey of 
present conditions, in correcting and bring- 
ing up to date the numerous maps, and in 
investigating some of the uses of oil peculiar 
to the southern counties, and has given the 
Reporter the opportunity to publish the 
following description of conditions as he 
found them. 

Coalinga is probably, at the present time, 
the most active field in the state, if we con- 
sider solely the number of wells drilling, 
though very likely the investments being 
made in northern Santa Barbara county are 
larger. In Coalinga practically everything 
capable of producing is on the pump, and 
some thirty or more wells are being drilled. 
This appears to be due in part to the unex- 
pected success met with by the operators in 
the southwest portion of the field, and partly 
to the flowing wells lately brought in. Much 
of the activity is probably due to the fact 
that the pipe line is taking oil as fast as 
offered, *nd the shutting down of the Bakers- 
field end seems to insure Coalinga operators 
an unlimited market, during the winter 
months at least. Great efforts are being made 
both to extend the field to the south, and to 
fill the gap between sections 28 and 31, with 
what success remains to be seen. While the 
oil developed in the southwest has been 
heavier than the average of Coalinga oil, the 
average gravity of the northeast portion of 
the field has been steadily rising, so that the 
general average is probably not far from 
what it was a year ago. 

The Kern River field has been so thor- 
oughly marked out that there is little pros- 
pect for anything surprising from that 
district. Development is going along stead- 
ily, but largely in the heart of the field, and 
particularly in the southeast corner. Market 
conditions here are a little unsettled by the 
shutting down of the pipe line, but the effect 
on new work is hardly noticeable. There is 
a good deal of talk of a refinery here, and 
some of the operators are very sanguine; the 
doubters point to the fact that the lot sup- 
posed to have been purchased covers but six 
or seven acres. Whatever the prospects for 
future demand may be, the field is now 
turning out an enormous quantity of oil, and 
appears to be good for great increase when 
needed. 

The sole show of activity in Sunset at 
present is the extension of the railroad to 
Maricopa, which is going along at a good 
rate. The pipe line is not much in evidence 
as yet, and in the meantime about every- 
thing except the group of wells near Sunset 
station is shut down. Several wells are being 
drilled, and within the defined limits seem to 
be meeting with entire success. 

Midway is completely at a standstill. One 
rig is at work just north of the Sunset line, 
and two or three near the north line of the 
Midway at the latter point with fairly uni- 
form success. As there are yet no means of 
getting out the product, there is naturally no 
actual production, and nothing to encourage 



drilling except hopes for the future. 

At McKittrick everything seems to be 
producing to its limit, though very little 
drilling is going on except at the north end 
of the field. Here there has been some 
marked extensions to the producing area, 
and there is nothing to indicate that the 
limits have been reached. There should be 
a large increase in production this year, as 



production is coming from old wells. It is 
claimed that the field is producing 70,000 
bbls. per month, which with 1150 wells 
would be very close to two barrels a day per 
well. 

Whittier and Fullerton are both appar- 
ently prosperous, practically everything 
producing, and considerable new work going 
on in both fields. Much of the ground 
through this territory is deep drilling, and 
most of the work is being done by large con- 
cerns, who are developing in a methodical 
and businesslike manner, and seem to find it 
profitable. Most of the new work at Fuller- 
ton is in the heavy oil end of the field, 
toward Brea Canyon, and some of the new 
wells here are magnificent producers. 

At Newhall almost nothing is being done, 
the prospecting in Placerita| having been 




Obispo Company's No. 1 and 2 Wells and Lake of Oil, Sunset. 



during the season a number of heavy pro- 
ducers have been brougnt in over this part of 
the district. 

In the city field at Los Angeles every- 
thing is being pumped to its full capacity, 
but there is practically no new work. The 
unlooked-for success of a couple of operators 
west of the city has caused a slight flurry, 
and some wells are being deepened in the 
east end, but aside from this, most of the 



entirely without result. The Standard are 
pumping their wells in Elsmere Canyon, and 
a few of the wells on the ridge above are 
pumping into their line; the other outfits are 
shut down. The old wells in Pico are of 
course in operation, and one or two strings 
are usually at work here. 

There is very little new work in evidence 
in Ventura county. The Union are doing 
some new work constantly, and several inde- 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



pendent concerns are drilling on the Ex- 
Mission. A fine well has lately been brought 
In near the north line of the grant, on the 
green oil belt, and another north of Sulphur 
Mountain. East of Santa Paula Canyon 
there is little activity, except the usual 
extensions on the old leases, and little of the 
prospecting done dnring the last two years 
seems to have amounted to much. 

At Summerland a recent storm destroyed 
several of the wharves, and considerably 
reduced the number of producing wells. 
Everything in this district is being pumped 
which can be made to pay expenses, but the 
number ol dismantled wells in the outskirts 
show all too plainly the shrinkage in produc- 
ing capacity, always felt first by the outer 
wells. Unless the efforts to find a deeper 
sand are more successful in future than they 



In the Alaska District. 

Fads That Show That in the Near Future This Will Be One of the Fore- 
most Fields in the World. 



C. M. Stone, who was formerly superin- 
tendent of the Monte Cristo Oil company In 
the Kern River field, is In Bakersfield after 
a summer spent in Alaska, where he has 
been in charge of the field operations of a 
sj niicate composed of Seattle, San Francisco 
and eastern men, who have been prospect- 
ing for oil In that far-off territory. The 
scene of operations has been about half-way 



big oil field and is preparing to o tain a 
plentiful supply of the needful crude oil. 

It is well known that the Southern Pacific 
railroad has had a trusted and experienced 
oil expert In that country for the last sum- 
mer. In fact the gentleman, who Is well 
known all over the state of California as 
having had charge of the railroad's oil pro- 
perty in the Kern county field up to the last 




Typical Scene at Summerland ; the Only Submarine Wells in the World. 



have been, this iatereetiDg little field will in 
a few years be a thing of the past. 

Most of the Interest in this portion of the 
country now centers in the territory along 
the north line of the county, where such 
unusual results have been gotten by deep 
drilling. Transportation, and tankage facili- 
ties are now in such shape that production is 
commencing to move, and some of the opera- 
tors are already feeling the relief. This 
entire territory has been taken up by large 
companies, and there is very little chance for 
the outsider, but it appears that this field 
will soon add largely to the total output, and, 
very fortunately, mostly in the shape of light 
oil. In the present condition of the oil 
market, the producer of refining oil is at a 
great advantage. 

The refining business over the entire state 
appears to be in a very prosperous condition. 
Even in Los Angeles, where for some time 
it was thought that the business had been 
permanently overdone, all the refineries 
appear to be making money, and two or 
three new plants are under way. The 
greatly increased output of refining oil from 
Whittier and Fullerton is probably to be 
credited with a large part of this result, as it 
is now possible for the refiners at Los 
Angeles to obtain supplies without looking 
to Ventura county. North of the mountains, 
however, the dearth of light oil still con- 
tinues, causing a great restriction in refining 
operations. 

In general, the oil business in California 
appears to be in extremely healthy con- 
dition. Competition Is encouraging con- 
sumption, by keeping prices within bounds, 
while the rapidly increasing production is 
causing a steady and normal increase in pro- 
duction. The general cessation in wildcat- 
ting is not to be regretted, as the territory 
already blocked out appears to be ample to 
meet all present demands. 



down the Alaskan peninsula between Cook's 
inlet and Dutch harbor. The indications 
have been very favorable for a good grade 
of light oil. On account of the failure to re- 
ceive part of the necessary machinery the 
company was delayed and only got the well 
started about the middle of August, and only 
reached the depth of 800 feet before forced 
to shut down and wait until spring. Nu- 
merous seepages of oil with the natural gas 
rising in the swamps abound in this district, 
and these people expect in the spring to 
finish up the well and see if they have 
found another good oil field in that country. 
Quite a number of Bakersfield people have 
become Interested in that territory, and in 
the spring expect to send another drilling 
crew to that place and put down an experi- 
mental well, having obtained control of a 
large quantity of land that looks like it will 
be very good oil territory. This Is the far- 
theset north that any well has been drilled 
in Alaska. Several companies are operating 
near Valdez, which is several hundred miles 
further south, and a San Francisco company 
and also a company composed of Seattle and 
Portland people is prospecting in the Cook's 
inlet country. No report has come from the 
Cook's inlet region so far, but at Valdez has 
been found some oil at a shallow depth, 
some 500 or 600 feet, and the well is good 
for some T50 or 200 barrels daily. The ma- 
jority of the island belongs to a veiy strong 
English syndicate, which from the oil men 
who know the people in charge of oper- 
ations is supposed to be nothing more than 
the Standard Oil company in another fa- 
miliar disguise. Knowing the present short- 
age of high gravity oil, the oil men think 
that this big corporation has discovered a 



spring, when he left to visit the Alaska oil 
oil field, in his own interests, so it was said, 
but it is known that when he commenced to 
investigate the situation he found nearly all 
of the most promising looking territory con- 
trolled by this English syndicate. 

The nearness of the oil.prospects to the 
coast, coupled with the fact that steamers 
can reach these points for about nine months 
in the year gives this prospective field a 
greater value than would at first sight seem 
possible, as it would be a comparative easy 
and inexpensive proposition to transport the 
oil from the field to refiners, either at Seattle 
or San Francisco. 

Quite a number of California operators 
are interested in these prospects, n able 
Chanslor & Canfie'd, who have had several 
strings of tools running in Alaska this past 
summer, and who intend sending several 
more there as soon as the season opens in 
the spring. Experienced oil men who have 
visited Alaska in the summer say that next 
spring fully twenty-five or thirty complete 
rigs will be sent to the different parts of 
Alaska, and the prospects are that there 
will be something doing in the oil business 
up there next summer. 

Rockefeller Takes it Easy. 

John D. Rockefeller no longer pays atten- 
tion to the management of the Standard Oil 
Co. He has not been in the Standard Oil 
building for eight years. He spends eight 
months of the year at Cleveland, Ohio. The 
Standard Oil Co. is now run largely by the 
young standard Oil element, such as F. W. 
Barstow, Walter Jennings, Chas. M. Pratt, 
Howard Page, J, A. Moffett, etc., and tbey 
have all had good training in Rockefeller 
methods, so that the Standard Oil destinies 
are in good and safe hands. 



PACIFIC Oil, REPORTER 



Asphalt Oil Pavements. 

A Technical Article Showing the Superiority of the California Over the 
Trinidad Product— By T. Hugh Boorman. 




Outside View of Columbian Oil, Asphalt and Refining- Co. 's Works, Carpentaria. 



Never has there been so much work done 
in bituminous pavements as during the past 
year. This is a good deal owing to the low 
prices at which that class of work has been 
taken by the contracting companies. A very 
conservative estimate of the amount of work 
laid in the United States in 1903 would be 
six million square yards, at a cost, including 
attendant work connected therewith, of not 
less than ten million dollars. It is Interest- 
ing to note the varied descriptions and va- 
rieties in the pavements of asphalt nomen- 
clature now in use. While a few years ago 
sheet asphalt pavements were almost con- 
fined to the use of Trinidad mixture and 
European rock asphalt, there are today many 
different pavements laid with bitumen 
for their matrix. The original asphalt pave- 
ment, the European bituminous limestones of 
Seyssel, Neuchatel, Limmer, Ragusa, etc., 
which crushed, powdered, and then heated 
and compressed by light rolling and hand 
stamping, needed no complicated machinery 
have been almost abandoned here, owing to 
their excessive cost ; Boston, New Orleans 
and Rochester appear to be the only cities 
in which such class of work has been done 
this year. . In this connection it is interest- 
ing to note that, although the trial Trinidad 
pavements in London and Paris have not 
been considered a success, an American rail- 
road asphalt plant was this spring sent to 
Hungary for the purpose of preparing the 
mixture of bitumen and sand which is giving 
successful results in that country. 

Natural rock asphalt pavements, however, 
have not been lost sight of in the United 
States, as an increased demand has been 
created for the use of Kentucky bituminous 
rock asphalt; a number of cities, to which 
the material could be delivered at reasonable 
freight rates, having adopted such pavement 
during the year, and the rock asphalt mines 
of Arkansas have been utilized on the streets 
of the city of Little Rock. In Texas some 



work has been done with the Uvalde rockas- 
phaltum from Clinton county in that state. 

The standard Trinidad asphalt pavement 
h-s still been the largest factor, but certainly 
has lost its supremacy. Exposures caused 
by the scandals in the asphalt trust have led 
to very vigorous investigations into the 
merits of bitumens other than that from the 



puriMes contained in the latter. 

Venezeula asphalt from the Inciarte lake, 
Maracaibo, has been found for instance to 
contain 99 per cent of bitumen as against 56 
percent in the refined Trinidad lake asphalt. 
This material has been extensively used this 
year and some 500,000 yards have been laid 
with it in Manhattan and Brooklyn during 
the current year in addition to work in other 
cities. California has also supplied the as- 
phalts for large areas of pavement and with 
likewise a 99 percentage of bitumen in its 
composition it has been used to the extent of 
some 500,000 yards in Greater New York. 
About one-fifth of this amount of work was 
claimed to have been laid with asphalt ob- 
tained from California rock asphalt, but the 
results in work done with asphalt obtained 
from the refining of California maltha, which 
by its disparagers is spoken of as " oil as- 
phalt," have certainly been fully as gocd. 
Owing to the revolutionary troubles in Ven- 
ezuela and legal complications there, com- 
paratively little asphalt has been imported 
from the province of Bermudez, but some 
work has been done with this material in 
Brooklyn. 

A refinery has been erected during the 
year near Tamplco, Mexico, which has 
supplied asphalt for use in Mexico and which 
will probably be a factor in next year's work 
here. 

It will be seen by the foregoing that cities 
may be assured of ample competition for 
work fro.n now on, and that the asphalt in- 
dustry in the future must be conducted re- 
gardless of monopoly and by those winning 
success by doing work with good materials, 
of which there is an ample supply, and with 
all the help that can be obtained by the use 
of modern machinery and experienced and 
capable superintendents. 

A noticeable feature of the year's opera- 
tions has been the increased interest in the 
idea of municipal asphalt plants. Severa 




Inside View, Columbian Oil, Asphalt and Refining Co.'s Works, Carpenteria. 



asphalt lake at Trinidad, by able engineers 
and chemists, and the result has been that 
during the past two years almost every large 
city in the Union, including New York and 
Philadelphia, has opened its street specifica- 
tions, so that other bitumens have been, or 
will be, permitted in the street mixtures, and 
a conclusion reached that many are superior 
to the Trinidad in consequence of the im- 



cities have started the business of doing their 
own repairs, but we have to go to Canada to 
fiud a city — Winnipeg — which has had new 
asphalt pavements laid by its own officials 
and bought Its asphalt direct from mine 
owners and refiners. Commissioner Living- 
ston, of Manhattan, in December submitted a 
report to the New York authorities urging 
an appropriation of $100,000 for a municipal 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



plant, using in it suggestion of the advisa- 
bility of ita adoption, prepared by Dr. James 
C. Baylies, who bas given much time to Ihe 
study of the subject. In regard to the ques- 
tion of municipal repair plants, plans are 
now being perfected for a comparatively in- 
expensive portable plant which can be used 
in connection with Kentucky asphalt 
powder. This machine will call for no man- 
ipulation of materials and saves experts' ser- 
vices, in the decision of whom the right mix- 
ture and heating is obtained. 

Directly In the line of asphalt pavements 
Is the " Bitullthic" pavement so extensively 
advertised and for which contracts for 1,200,- 
000 square yards were last year obtained. 
This pavement is applicable particularly for 
steep grades where a positively smooth pave- 
ment is undesirable, and for such pavements 
as West 72nd street, New York City, which 
forms a part of the park driveway system 
and for which a contract has just been 
awarded to the patentees by the park depart- 
ment. 

One other bituminous pavement must be 



Important Oil Land Deal. 

John A. Bunting, Purchaser-New Company Incorporated—Growing Pop- 
ularity of the Coalinga District. 



It was a new proof of the growing popu- 
larity of the Coalinga oil field when John 
A. Bunting and his associates, after selling 
out a large part of their holdings in Kern 
River came to Coalinga last September and 
purchased 80 per cent of the capital stock of 
the Esperanza Oil and Gas company, one of 
the largest producers of the west side. This 
property has been greatly improved under 
the present management and now bas three 
flowing wells, a water well, a model electric 
plant, well No. 4 down 750 feet and material 
for well No. 5 on the ground. This company 
has just erected three steel tanks with capa- 
city of 31,000 barrels. The company Is now 



year, viz.: John A. Bunting, W. L. B. Mills, 
J. F. Davies, G. A. Scott, C. M. Kilbourn, T 
A. Palache and Thomas O'Donnell. The 
first four named are directors of the San 
Joaquin Oil and Development company, 
which company was one of the largest pro- 
ducers of the Kern River field. The first 
four together with C. M. Kilbourn are also 
directors of the Esperanza Oil and Gas com- 
pany. Mr. Kilbourn was also one of the 
original owners of the Home Oil company. 
Mr. Palache is a successful business man of 
this city. Mr. O'Donnell is a practical oil 
man of long experience in the different oil 
fields of this state and Is now located at 




California's Greatest Refinery, the Standard at Point Richmond. 



mentioned which has been extensively used 
whtre a smooth pavement is not applicable, 
and that is the asphalt block pavement. 
This pavement is not only used extensively 
in the United States, but Is exported to South 
America, and to places where asphalt plants 
and experts cannot be arranged for. 



Asphaltum in Salt Lake. 



A remarkably curious and interesting dis- 
closure is that involved in a sample of as- 
phaltum brought in recently from the west 
side of the Promotory by D. D. Tarpey. In 
this locality the deposits of asphaltum ap- 
pear to be at the bottom of the Greit Salt 
Lake, and the mineral Is being there taken 
out of the shallow waters In considerable 
quantities. A .number of claims have al- 
ready been staked off by parties interested 
and it is reported that plans are now under 
way for the organization of a company that 
will test the resources of this strange re- 
gion.— Salt Lake Tribune. 



Pacific Oil Reporter is $2.50 per year. 



on a paying basis and announces that first 
dividend will be paid February 1st. 

So well pleased were these gentlemen 
with the Esperanza property and that part 
of the Coalinga filed in genet al that it has 
been known among oil men for some time 
they were negotiating for a still larger tract 
in the heart of this field. How well they 
have selected their new territory is apparent 
when the announcement is made that John 
A. Bunting has purchased from the Union 
Oil company 140 acres in the NE^ of sec- 
tion 12, township 20 south, range 14 east. 
This land is in close proximity to the best 
wells of the west side field such as the Es- 
peranza, the Section Seven, and the Union 
Oil company wells, and there is no doubt 
but what this tract is in the heart of the fin- 
est producing territory of this field which is 
now attracting so much attention. 

A company to be known as the Shawmut 
Oil company has been formed to operate 
this territory. The company has a capital 
stock of $500,000 and $350,000 has been sub- 
scribed by the following persons who will 
act as the board of directors for the first 



Coalinga. So this company is formed by 
men, all of whom have made a success of the 
oil business in this state. Mr. Bunting pre- 
dicts that they can make this property a 
dividend payer the same as the other pro- 
perties in which they have been Interested. 
It is announced that operations will begin at 
once on this land and carried forward ener- 
getically until this company shall be one of 
the largest producers of crude oil in the 
state. The officers of the company will be 
located In the Crossley building with the 
other Bunting officers. 



FOR SALE 

A complete oil well drilling 
outfit near Huntington, Ore- 
gon. Inventory and price 
on application to 
H. V. GATES, Hillsboro, Oregon 



to 



MCltflC OIL REPORTER 



The Wyoming Field. 

Rapid Development of the Most Important Oil Territory in the Inter= 

mountain District. 



The most productive part of the Wyoming 
oil field is that portion of Uinta county ly- 
ing between the Oregon Short Line railway 
and the Utah boundary, on the south, and 
extending a few miles in width from east to 
west. Like many of our important oil fields 
oil was discovered here by accident, but from 
that time, the fall of 1901, development has 
been very rapid. Already discoveries have 
been made in some twelve or fourteen 
wells and it is said that there are eight wells 
in this district that will produce better than 
twenty barrels per day and some of them are 
claimed to be better than fifty-barrel wells. 
The oil from the majority of these wells Is 
cf a'paraffine base and has a gravity of 46 
Baume, but sometime last August a well was 
developed in the southern portion of the 
field which yielded a 32 gravity oil which 
seemed to contain neither paraffine nor as- 
phaltum, but a considerable amount of 
residuum, together with a very large amount 
of lubricating oil and kerosene. It was 
claimed at the time that the well would do 
better than 100 barrels a day but this Is 
denied by those who are in a position to 
know, however, the company drilled the 
well to a depth of some 1,680 feet passing 
through five stratas of oil sand yielding a 
similar grade of oil as the first. Another 
well put down some twenty miles to the 
west of the developed strip struck a thin 
sand at 550 feet which yielded a very su- 
perior grade of lubricating oil but not in 
commercial quantities. The majority of the 
wells in this district yield the high gravity 
illuminating oil mentioned above, running 
over 50 per cent in light products and hav- 
ing less than 1 per cent of residuum. The 
companies who have done the major part 
of the development work in Uinta county 
are the American Consolidated, Atlantic & 
Pacific, Standard Reserve and Jager com- 
panies. The Standard Reserve strike is one 



of the latest and Is claimed to be the best 
well in the field and the well is In good 
shape, free from water. 

It is claimed by those well versed in oil 
formations that the Indications for some 
twenty miles directly north of the present 
producing wells, is the most promising. No 
wells have been put down on this territory, 
It being simply natural that that part of the 
field near«st the railways should receive the 
first attention. "Oyster Ridge", a formation 
which guides oil prospectors in this district, 
passes directly through it and is practically 
unbroken. As development work will na- 
turally extend along in this direction It is 
very likely that many good wells will be 
brought in here the coming season. 

At Fossil two or three wells have been 
put down the past season but with practi- 
cally no indications oi oil. There are many 
seepages in the Fossil district but the coun- 
try is very badly broken up and it is thought 
that no productive wells will be brought in 
there. 

One well was put down near the Utah 
line on the west, to a depth of some 1,300 
feet, but no indications of oil was struck, 
and, consequently, many thousands of acres 
of land taken up under the placer mining 
laws, will be allowed to elapse. Near the 
productive zone nearly all land was covered 
by assessment, some of it being done early 
in the fall. 

The average depth of the wells in the 
Uinta field is about 1,200 feet, and the 
formation is somewhat difficult to drill in, 
requiring extra heavy tools and boxes. 
There is also scarcity of water, that Is 
common in most of our western oil fields. 
There are good springs within two or three 
miles of the present scene of development 
and is transported in pipe lines, but, owing 
to the extremely cold weather in these 
parts, cnnot be utilized in the winter, 



therefore practically all development is at 
a standstill from the first of December to the 
first of May each year, so, natuially, a great 
deal of time is lost owing to the short drill- 
ing season. 

No oil has yet been shipped from the 
Uinta county field, although it is claimed 
that it would be possible to deliver about 
400 or 500 barrels a day of the 46 gravity 
oil at the present time. Several 1,000-barrel 
tanks have been set up on the fiat north of 
Spring Valley and are being filled from two 
of the Atlantic & Pacific wells on section 
22, 15-118. 

From present indications there will be 
about a dozen strings of tools running here 
in the spring, and it is probable that the out- 
put will be increased to a sufficient amount 
to warrant the Standard, or some other pur- 
chaser, coming after it. 



Fake Oil Company's Work, 

One of the deleterious influences in the 
development of new oil fields has been the 
fake oil company put on foot and managed 
by a promoter who had no real interest in 
the field except what he could make out of 
the Investor. The investor who attempted 
to make his own venture soon found that 
there was nothing doing for him. He would 
look at a lease and figure that It was good if 
he could get it on one-eighth royalty, with 
small rental clause. He would think it over 
at night and come around next morning to 
find that some stock company had brought 
the lease for $5,000 or $10,000, and after sev- 
eral such experiences he would go home 
with his hammer out. The stock company, 
which gathers in a little of everybody's 
money — literally speaking, "everybody" 
takes a flyer in the oil business these days — 
can well afford to pay an exorbitant price 
for a property which looks as If it lay in the 
oil belt. If it is a failure, the stockholders 
can grin and bear it, but it is a safe gamble 
that the promoter has very little of his own 
money invested in the deal. The Idea is to 
spend money for some one else — and the 
promoter is working on velvet during the 
entire game. Then when production is fin- 
ally secured, comes the great expense of 
fitting up a plant. The average person not 
acquainted with the oil Industry, imagines 
that the minute the oil sand is found the 
well becomes a foundation of wealth. — Bonds 
& Mortgages. 



OUR 



Large Dome Boilers 



Ape the Best 



Ask our Customers 



Reading 

Drive Pipe, Casing, Tubing, Line Pipe 
(Iron, not Steel) 






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R. H. HERRON CO. 



Log Angeles Coalinga Bakersfield 
San Francisco McKittrick Sunset 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTED 



ti 



n 



NEWS FROM THE FIELD 



Supplied bv oar Regular Correspondents 



* ■■^^■■^'«i ^^^^^^^^^^j^*^^ ^^i^ 



Coalinga Letter. 



Coaunga, Dec. 29, 1903. 

The Maine State Oil has been engaged in 
drilling a water well on the south line of its 
lease in section 31, where most of the drill- 
ing operations will be carried on lor some 
time to come. The seventh rig stands com- 
pleted awaiting the completion of well No. 
6. The addition of several new houses to 
the camp together with the new rigs erected 
gives the lease an appearance of progresslve- 
ness. 

The California Oilfields Limited Is busy 
grading preparatory for the erection of an- 
other rig on section 27. Well No. 16 is now 
in the sand at 1,275 feet and Indications bid 
fair for the finishing of a fine producer. The 
company is also rigging up to drill another 
of its wells to the > eep sand. 

The Peerless Oil company in section 22, 
report a showing of oil at a depth of only 
800 feet. 

One of the largest land deals on record for 
Coalinga was consumated three weeks ago, 
consisting in the purchase of 140 acres in 
NE% of section 12, 20-14. The purchase 
price is said to be $175,000. The land was 
owned by the Union Oil company and the 
purchasers are men interested in the Es- 
peranza Oil and Gas company, including Mr. 
John Bunting. This land is unquestionably 
one of the most valuable pieces of property 
in this field, bordering the gushers of the 
."-ection Seven Oil company on the east and 
the well of the Roberts Oil company on the 
west, while it is also in close proximity to 
the flowing wells of the Pleasant Valley 
Farming company. Penn-Coalinga Pe- 
troleum company, and the Esperanza Oil 
company. Operations will begin very soon 
and will be conducted under the Esperanza 
management. 

The No. 3 well of the Mercantile Crude 
Oil company is steadily gaining in its pro- 
duction with the present output of close on 
to 200 barrels per day. The company is 
contemplating drilling another well on its 
south line bordering the Esperanza pro- 
perty in the near future. 

Commercial Petroleum company spudded 
in on its No.^ on the 28th inst., giving it 
three drilling rigs at the present time. 
Work on all three is being pushed as much 
as possible in order that the three yet to be 
drilled may be completed in time to comply 
with the stipulations of the railroad lease. 
No. 3 is expected to be finished shortly, hav- 
ing gone through considerable of the paying 
oil sand. 

The Aetna Oil company on section 30 has 
just finished the erection of a derrick in the 
SE%. 

After going to a depth of over 600 feet, 
operations on the Call Oil company pro- 
perty has been indefinitely suspended owing 
to the difficulty in regaining some lost tools. 

The Pacific Coast Oil company is adding 
another pump to its pumping plant on sec- 
tion 6 to keep abreast with the, increasing 
production on the west side caused by the 
constantly bringing in of new wells. 

Work on the Nathan lease on section 7 
continues uninterruptedly in spite of the 



constant rumor that unless two wells were 
completed by the i6lh of December the lease 
would be forfeited and levert to the South- 
ern Pacific railroad. If the rumors are 
founded and arrangements have been made 
with the railroad for an extension, the con- 
ditions are not known. However, work has 
been rushed on both wells right from the 
beginning. 

The Pleasant Valley Farming company 
will have rig No. 3 ready for drilling as soon 
as No 2 gets finished; the latter Is now pene- 
trating the oil sand. 

Very few companies in the field observed 
Christmas as a holiday. Most of the drilling 
rigs worked with few exceptions. It is the 
tendency here when a hole once started to 
hurry its completion with as little delay as 
possible. And this is becoming more and 
more prevalent due to the fact that contract 
work is rapidly supplanting the drilling of 
wells by day labor. 

R. M. D. 



Kern River Letter. 



Bakersfield, Dec. 31, 1903. 

The Associated last Sunday closed up its 
city office and moved everything to the Kern 
River field, where it will hereafter be located 
in the building just completed on the San 
Joaquin lease. The company has always 
maintained a considerable electrical clerical 
force at this point, and by moving its city 
offices there, it has placed all its local busi- 
ness together. The new building contains a 
private office for General Superintendent 
Henderson and a large room for the other 
members of the force, 

Scarcely any drilling operations are re- 
ported from the field this week. During the 
year obout 175 wells have been completed, 
over half of these being drilled by the Asso- 
elated. The fact that the Standard is not 
increasing its purchases of oil, is keeping 
many producers from attempting any further 
development work at present. The Asso- 
ciated has practically completed most of the 
drilling which was required for the present 
contracts with the subordinate companies 
which entered the combine, and the result is 
a season of quiet in the drilling operations 
which a few months ago were going on 
everywhere. 

There is an opinion prevalent among 
many oil men that the coming year may wit- 
ness the commencement of dividend-paying 
by the Associated. 

The enormous outlays of money made 
necessary the extensive drilling operations 
carried on the several leases according to 
contract requirements now being over, it is 
thought that the company will find itself in a 
position to make money for its stockholders 
from the great sales of oil which it is making 
•11 the time Instead of paying it out for 



expenses in the purchase of materials and 
salaries of officials and drillers. By many 
the annual report Is looked forward to with 
much interest. This should appear some 
time in February. There is also a strong 
belief among oil men that the low price 
reported for Associated stocks from time to 
time on the San Francisco exchange is not 
warranted. 

While Kern River continues quiet during 
the holidays, an estimate recently received 
by local oil men from the Coalinga field 
shows that that district is quite active, some- 
what as a result, perhaps, of the fact that the 
Standard is at present using ils pipe line 
exclusively for Coalinga oil. The figures 
furbished by reliable parties show that the 
Fresno field has thirty-one wells now drilling 
which is proportionately much greater than 
at Kern River. Of completed wells, Kern 
River has over 750 and Coalinga 115. 
The production of the latter is probably 
about 9,000 a day — average for the year 
— the amount being at present perhaps 
much greater on account of the activity 
caused by the fact that the Standard is 
operating so extensively there at present. 
A. R. Hinton. 



Texas Production. 



Texas produced 23.579,811 barrels of the 
80,894,590 barrels of oil produced in the 
United States in 1902. More than $io,ooo,- 
000 has been invested. in the Beaumont dis- 
trict in oil refineries, and there is an 
investment of $2,725,000 in storoge tanks. 
There are 35 barges and 15 steamships 
engaged in transporting Beaumont oil, which 
now commands a price of 65 cents per barrel. 
Some of the Texas oil companies are paying 
large dividends. The Lone Acre Oil Co. 
has paid 51 per cent this year, the Oriole Co. 
50 per cent, the Black Hawk Co. 50 per cent, 
the Texas Co. 12 per cent, and the Burt 
Refinery (Standard Oil) 10 per cent. 



Utah Oil Land Deal. 



An oil land deal of magnitude, which has 
been pending for some weeks, was closed 
Thursday when Ben T. Lloyd secured from 
local and California parlies an option on n,- 
000 acres af land near Farmington, the tract 
surrounding the holding of the Galey crowd 
and being considered as having within its 
boundary lines much of the best ground of 
the region. Those for whom Mr. Lloyd 
acted in the transaction are operators of 
Pennsylvania, whom Mr. Lloyd asserts are 
ready to begin work on an extensive scale, 
if the results of their expert's examinations, 
which will be made within the next thirty 
days, is satisfactory. — Salt Lake Tribune. 



The subscription price of the Pacific Oil 
Reorter is $2.50 per year. 




BATES' 

PATENT CASING TONOS 



1416-1436 19th St., Bakcrafield, Cal. 



Fills a long-felt want. No more need of 
pole and rope for screwing up casing. Bates 
Tongs can be applied to the casing anywhere 
in driving or pulling without danger of injury 
or parting casing. 

Set No. 1, with any two size jaws from 9$^ 
to 13 J4 inches. 

Set No. 2, with any two size jaws from 
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PACIFIC Oil, REPORTER. 



NEWS FROM THE COAST 




Recent Developments ia California Fields, u 



Hall Moon Bay. 

The Pilarcitos Oil company have made good pro- 
gress during the past ten days of good weather. 
This company is located a little north and east of 
Halfmoon Bay. 

The High Gravity Oil company on Tunitas Creek 
are making fairly good progress, although they are 
in a very hard formation at the present time. The 
indications are splendid for a good well and they 
have passed through a number of light oil stratas. 

The American Duchess is making arrangemerts 
for carrying on the work of development, early in 
the spring, as soon as settled weather is assured. 

Work has been started up on the Paxton well, and 
as this company Is located only 400 feet; from) the 
gusher, the manager is sanguine of getting a big 
producer. 

The Wisconsin company will begin the drilling of 



the Purissima canyon. Mr. Guiberson reports that 
within the next six months, they expect to do a 
great deal of development work. 
Wyoming. 

While doing assessment work on section 26, 14-120, 
this week, the Bettys Oil and Development compauy 
struck some fine coal croppings. This ccal belongs 
to the Dakota formation, and should a paying vein 
be developed, it will prove very profitable to the 
company. As Is well known, the coal found in this 
formation proves a fine cooking article. With coal 
so handy and the finest water for steam purposes, 
the Bettys company will b? able to operate as eco- 
nomically as any concern in the field. 
Santa Barbara. 

The Union Oil company's new well, "The Puris- 
sima," proves that the Lompoc field is one of the 
largest and best in the State of California. The 
Purissima well is directly north of the town of Lom- 
poc about six miles. The oil was struck the middle 
of November and it is showing up to the expectations 
of the owners who have spent large sums in this 
field on the belief that oil could be found. The well 
is on the Purissima Rancho, formerly the property 
of John H. Wise, but now belonging to the Union 
Oil company. It is on the south slope of the Lom- 
poc anticline and west of the 350-barrel well known 



sea, were seriously damaged some six weeks ago by 
the high tides of that period. But the damage done 
at that time has no n been repaired. And most of 
the wells have been sanded out and restored to their 
normol production. A plan is on foot now, and will 
soon be put in operation to test thoroughly the pos- 
sibilities of obtaining a deep well, at this point. All 
the arguments of the beat experts who have exam- 
ined the section point to the feasibility of such an 
enterprise, and several attempts have been made to 
test the matter; the last one by the Crescent Oil Co 
was started on the Ortega Rancho, just back of the 
town, but difficulties encountered in the broken np 
strata at that point forced the suspension of the 
work, at a depth of about 1200 feet. The new effort, 
we understand, will be made at some point on the 
sea front, and will be carried down in spite of all 
obstacles to a depth of 2000 feet or more. 
Carpenteria. 

A further effort has been made to deepen the well 
sunk a year ago on the Townsite of Carpenteria. 
But the bad condition of that work rendered the 
effort futile. It is now planned to use this well to 
furnish additional water to the refinery of the 
Columbian Co. on the Alcatraz Tract. 

Los Conchas Asphalt Deposits. 

The vast deposits of asphalt and bituminous rock 




Typical Scene at McKlttrick ; the Dabuey Oil Company's Property. 



some shallow wells within a short time. Preparations 
are now being made to carry on the work, as scon as 
the weather conditions permit. 

The independent well shows up in magnificent 
form. A few days ago, it was uncapped and oil shot 
to the top of the derrick. 

J. E. Kerr of San Francisco, who is the president 
and general manager of a number of companies oper- 
ating in this field in the past two years, spent sev- 
eral days this week upon the lease and now reports 
that he is erecting rigs for No. 7 and 8 and Installing 
machinery and will begin drilling within a short 
time. Mr. Kerr states that he has great confidence 
in the future possibility of this field and believes 
that within a few years, there will be hundreds of 
wells producing the highest grade oil ever found in 
California and that these wells will be over a stretch 
of country beginning at the ocean, a short distance 
below Halfmoon Bay, following in a southeasterly 
direction and extending to or beyond Sanla Cruz 
He further reports that there is no better surface in- 
dicatious in an oil field in the country than can be 
found in San Mateo county and those counties lying 
to the south. 

Messrs. Guiberson, Sallee and Hayne are instati- 
ng rr ohinery for the drilling of wells 7 and 8 in 



as Hill No. 1, also the property of the Union Oil 
company that is now pumping on an average of 
about 250 barrels a day of oil from Hill No. I. The 
Purissima is judged by some of the most expert oil 
men to be even better than Hill No. 1 and the test 
about 21°. This well means proved territory as an 
oil field of no small extent and will before a great 
while be producing large quantities. This formation 
is found to exist for twenty miles from the Burton 
and Dutard ranches on the Pacific Coast as far back 
in a southeasterly direction as Santa Rita and Buell 
ranch. Of this vast territory the Union Oil com- 
pany owns about 75,000 acres. The Lompoc Oil De- 
veloping company owns some very fine territory of 
about 1,100 acres, the Los Alamos Oil Developing 
company and the Pacific Transportation company 
all have some good territory. All of these com- 
panies are putting down wells to prove their terri- 
tories. By the time the* other oil companies get oil 
the present price on land will be small compared 
with the prices to which they will advance. There 
are now in the northern part of Santa Barbara 
county some twenty or thirty producing wells. 

Summerland. 

The oil wells of this section, a large number of 
which are sunk from wharves jutting out into the 



at Los Conchas point, lying just east of the Car- 
penteria creek, have long been noted among the re- 
markable sites of this district. Some years ago the 
principal part of this deposit was bought by Mr. 
William Crocker and others. And the construction 
of a plant for utilizing the bituminous rock and the 
production of asphalt was commenced by them.. 
This was afterwards sold to the Alcatraz Asphalt 
company and the plant constructed was by this com- 
pany greatly enlarged and improved, and developed 
into a refinery, capable of handling all kinds of oils, 
and asphalt products. Subsequently the Alcatraz 
company was merged into the asphalt trust and 
the property came under the control of the Ameri- 
can Asphalt company. Since the disruption of the 
asphalt trust the property has fallen into the hands 
of the Columbian Oil Asphalt and Refining com- 
pany and is now being occupied by them. This 
latter company has still further improved and re- 
newed the plant of the refinery, and is at present 
adding to the ordinary refinery plant, apparatus for 
working up the distillate into the finer products of 
petroleum. 

And at the same time they are developing the 
quarries of natural asphalt rock on the premises, 
with a view of supplying the large demand at present 
arising, for this material, in the surfacing of the 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



13 



suburban roads sod boulevards of Santa Barbara 
arid vicinity. The great improvements that have 
lately been made in the city of Santa Barbara and 
in other towns along the Santa Barbara chan- 
nel, has lately attracted thousands of winter visitors 
to this section. And this influx has sbowa great 
necessity for improved driveways, connecting at 
different towns. And the well known excellent 
qualities of the natural rock asphalt for surfacing 
such driveways is developing a great demand for 
this product. 

The property of the Columbian Oil Asphalt and 
Refining company is adapted to supply this demand 
from its location as well as from the great abun- 
dance of t l e material on the ground, held by the 
company. The railroad tracks are now being ex- 
tended into these asphalt i|'iarries so as to facilitate 
loading the material. 

Hlggins Tract. 

The asphalt deposits extend also over the Iliggins 
tract lying ajacent to the Alcatraz property and the 
Columbian company have sunk a well on this tract 
through the deposit with a vi:w of reaching the 
sources of petroleum which theoretically should un- 
derlie it. This well, after several efforts, has been 
sunk to a depth of 1,400 feet where some difficulties 
with the casing were encountered, but the indica- 
tions appear to be very hopeful, and we understand 
that plans are on foot to shortly resume work. 



Flowing Oil Well at Exposition: 

The organization of the geologic branch at the 
St. Louis Exposition will be illustrated by a wall dia- 
gram show ng the divisions and sections iu*o whioh 
it is divided for working purposes. The location of 
all field parties working in 1904 will be shown on a 
large wall map, the work of the separate sections be- 
ing indicated by different colors. 

The areas in the United States which have been 
geologically investigated will be shown on another 
large wall map. Those areas concerning which geo- 
logic folios have been published will be indicated by 
one color and unpublished areas by another. 

The work of the sections of areal Pleistocene, pre- 
Cambrian, metamorphic and economic geology, and 
of paleontology will be illustrated by numerous 
maps, sections and diagrams exhibited in wing 
fram s attached to a pillar. 

The process of constructing geologic maps will be 
shown in all its steps, from the collection of field 
data to the completed map ready for publication. 
A typical geologic folio will be exhibited on these 
frames, as well as other maps and diagrams that 
have special interest. 

The section of petrology will illustrate, by means 
of a machine in operation, the methods of cutting, 
grinding and preparing thin sections of rocks for 
microscopic examination. The rock sections thus 
prepared will be exhibited in a microscope. The 
educatioral series of rocks prepared by this branch 
for the use of schools and colleges will be exhibited 
incases. Notebooks used in field work, illustrating 
the methods of recording observations, will also be 
exhibited. 

The geologic branch will also exhibit a working 
model of an area in southeastern Ohio illustrating a 
method of mapping an underground stratum bear- 
ing petroleum. The model will be painted in colors 
and the oil wells within its area will be located, as 
well as the outcrops of commercially valuable beds 
of coal and clay. A flowing oil well and a burning 
gas well will be features of this model. 

Among other attractions exhibited this' branch" 
wil 1 be an economic model of Alaska showing the 
location of gold placers and mines, the occurrence of 
copper and other metals, and the coal fields and 
forested areas, as well as glaciers and tundras. The 
bottom of the North Pacific ocean, adjacent to 
Alaska, which has a depth of 18,700 feet, and the 
great submerged plateau upon which the Aleutian 
Islands rest will be brought out in contrast with the 
shallowness of the eastern part of Behring sea and 
its sudden drop from 500 to 12,000 feet in depth. The 
model will be painted in colors. Complete sets of 
field notebooks and special field instruments used by 
this division will be shown, in connection with an 
exhibit of office methods for the reduction of field 
notes. 

The division of mining and mineral resources will 
show by means of a diagram the methods adopted 
for the collection of information. Specimens of the 
various forms used in field work and correspondence 
will be exhibited. The method of cataloguing and 
indexing the information received will be shown, 
and various diagrams illustrating the mineral pro- 
duction of the United States will have places on the 
walls of the exhibit. 



Activity in Utah. 



While Utah takes a great deal of pride In 
Its metal mining industry, there Is a very 
good prospect that before the new year is 
very old, the state will enjoy a boom in the 
oil mining business. More or less prospect- 
ing in this fiald has been going on for several 
years past, but it was only recently that big 
operators were induced to take hold and 
prospect for oil in the Salt Lake valley. 
Since the 1st of the present month, however, 
machinery for several rigs has been arriving, 
and it will be but a short time till boring 
begins in the vicinity of Farmington, four- 
teen miles north of this city, by one and 
possibly two different combinations, while 
others will be at work in the vicinity of 
Brigham City and on the west of Promon- 
tory, in Box Elder county. 

J. M. Guffey and John H. Gailey, the 
millionaire operators of Pittsburg, men who 
have the reputation of being the largest oil 
developers in America, have decided, afer 
personal and expert investigation, that this 
valley holds out excellent promise of yield- 
ing oil and gas in inexhaustible quantities. 
In support of their judgment they are now 
preparing to sink a half dozen or more wells 
and spend a large amount of money. They 
have acquired something like 15,000 acres of 
land upon which to demonstrate their opin- 
ions, and if they succeed — as they are very 
certain they will— derricks will be as numer 
ous between here and Ogden as are tele- 
phone poles at the present time. Men who 
have been through oil excitements de- 
clare that there is nothing extravagant 
in such an assertion, and not a few of 
them can now be found in this city who 
agree that conditions most favorable to 
astonishing results. 

Since it was learned that the Guffey- 
Galley syndicate had decided to invade this 
region there has been the liveliest kind of a 
scramble for leases, bonds and options upon 
lands in this and the valleys to the north, 
and a well posted individual stated o few 
days ago that there was no question but that 
more than 100,000 acres of land were then 
tied up by men who invariably travel in the 
wake of such explorers as Gufley and Gal- 
ley. Some of these men, it is said, will be 
instrumental in bringing not a little capital 
into the field themselves, and before the 
pioneers have had time to show the value of 
the field they have selected, drilling will 
have been commenced at numerous other 
points. 

During the past month another syndicate 
of eastern operators has secured land in the 
vicinity of the Galley-Guffey tract, as well as 
a large acreage just west of Brigham City, in 
Box Elder county, and the promise is made 
that it will be doing business within the next 
thirty days. Another combination is prepar- 
ing to go to work ot the north end of the 
lake, where oil oozes out and spreads over 
the water for miles around, while still other 
parties are getting ready to test the lands 
along the lake shore from the mouth of the 
Jordan River to Saitair. 

Natural gas was produced at Farmington, 
on lands secured by Guffey and Gailey, a 
dozen years ago. It was piped to this city 
and used for some time, but it gradually 
decreased in volume, and finally practically 
played out altogether. This was due to the 
fact, it is now claimed, that the wells. The 
same conditions are found around Brigham 
City. 



Pennsylvania Fields Best in the 
World. 



Professor Edmond O'Neill of the Depart- 
ment of Chemistry, University of California, 
arrived this week on the Pacific Mall steamer 
Siberia after a tour of the world, The pro- 
fessor has been absent from the university 
for more than eight months, and during tnat 
time made an exhaustive study In the oil 
fields in all parts of the world. 

He left here primarily as a delegate from 
the United States to the Fifth International 
Congress of Applied Chemistry, held in Ber- 
lin several months ago. He was elected 
vice-president of the first meeting of the con- 
gress, and read a paper on "California Pe- 
troleum." From Berlin Professor O'Neill 
traveled through Europe and Asia and 
made a thorough study or the production of 
oil in Russia, Burmah, Sumatra and Japan. 
In telling of his investigations Professor 
O'Neill said: 

"I found the largest oil fields in Russia. 
There the work of refining crude petroleum 
oil has been going on for many years, and 
there are many large refineries located in 
those regions. The oil fields in Russia are 
altogether different from those in Pennysl- 
vania and California. The oils are also 
different, and it is my opinion that California 
petroleum oil excels the Russian product in 
that it contains larger quantities of the 
paraffines. The oil-producing regions in 
Sumatra, Burmah and Japan have been de- 
veloped only recently, and as yet yield 
small amounts. Foreign capital, however, 
is becoming interested in these fields and re- 
fineries are being ereeted in large numbers. 

In my investigations I found none of the 
oil-producing regions to equal in quantity 
and quality of product the fields of Penn- 
sylvania. My trip has been very instructive 
and interesting. I shall resume my work in 
the University of California at the beginning 
of the coming term." 



Decrease in Coal Importations. 



Since the sailing of the Steamship Ven- 
tura, December 10th, there has been the 
following arrivals of coal from Australia, 
viz.: Ladas, 2,200 tons; Kensington, 2,727 
tons; Thistle, 3,640 tons; Zinita, 849 tons; 
total, 9.416 tons. There are seventeen ves- 
sels under engagement to carry, coal from 
the colonies on the way, and to load, with a 
carrying capacity of about 46,000 tons; of 
these there are nine cargoes already afloat, 
and a portion of these "to load" will not 
leave for several months yet. The quantity 
of Australia coal now here, is very light, the 
major portion of same being Richmond ccal, 
which is being reserved for domestic uses 
only. The deliveries of Colonial coals at 
this port for the present year, will be over 
50,000 tons in excess of 1902; this has been 
brought about by the remission of the duty 
on same of 67 cents per ton; as this will 
probably be renewed in 1904, the outlook 
for an increased importation is disccuraging, 
and another serious draw-back to an in- 
creased importation the coming year, will be 
a local demand in Australia for carriers to 
move the large quantity of wheat just com- 
ing in. If the Colonial Colliery proprietors 
solicit a portion of the coal trade here, they 
will be forced to reduce their F. O. B. price 
at Newcastle about one shilling per ton. 
This will be a necessity to meet the compe- 
tition that will exist between the British 
Columbia and Australian coals in 1904. 



i 4 PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



The Fountain 

The American Duchess 

The Wisconsin Gold Bond 



IN — 



Half Moon Bay 



The only field In California producing 52 gravity oil ; paraffine base. 

The recent bringing in of the Independent gusher is considered the most important strike in California in recent years. 

The following companies have extensively developed holdings immediately adjoining the strike : 

The Fountain Oil Company upon whose lease the strike was made, No treasury stock in this company has been offered for 

sale in the last two years. We have made arrangements by which we can offer a very small amount of this stock for sale, for a 
limited time, at $1.00 per share. 

The Wisconsin Gold Bond Oil Company has a well down nearly 1600 feet, which has produced thousands of dollars worth of 
oil and is still going deeper. This stock is now selling at 50 cents and will undoubtedly be. at a much higher figure in the near 
future. For blocks of this stock at this price, write or wire us Immediately. 

The American Duchess Oil Company not only holds a large acreage in the best productive portion of this field, but controls an 
interest in other very valuable properties. For shares or information address us. Stock now selling at 50 cents. 

A new company, now organizing, has secured extensive properties in this field, including a well now drilling within 400 feet of 
the gusher. All of these stocks purchased through us are protected by our Trust Fund Agreement. For information address, 

DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY, 

Rialto Building, San Francisco, Cal. 




U. M. THOMAS 

318 Pine Street San Francisco 



The only exclusive oil land agency on 

the Coast. Buy and sell proven 

oil lands in all the 

California fields 



The Coalinga Field 



is monopolizing the attention of oil men at present. The wonderful productiveness of the field, the high-grade oil and the splen- 
did marketing facilities make this the most attractive field on the coast for investors. 

I have several exceptional bargains in the heart of the field. "Proven territory, producing wells, fee title — prices reason- 
able. 



Map of the Coalinga Field. 



I have the only reliable map of the field ever issued. Printed on white linen paper. Shows every producing oil well in 
the field. Also drilling wells, water wells, pipe lines, storage tanks, wagon roads, etc. Sent prepaid on receipt of $1.00. 



PACIFIC OIL RBPORTB* 



Monthly Exports of OH from San Francisco. 





Mineral, Cum, 


Naphtha, 
All Ligh 
ucts of Oi 


Mineral. Rekinfd, or Manifactured. 


CoDxmu. 


IWCLUDINC MAT- 
URAL OILS. WITH- 
OUT REGARD TO 
GRAVITY. 


nctuding 
erPrud- 

sti Uation. 


Illuminating. 


Lubricating 

and Heavy Paraffine 

Oils. 


Residuum, including 

Tar and all other 
from which the light 
bodies have been dis- 
tilled. 




Gallons 


Value 


Gallons 


Value 


Gallon! 


Value 


Gallons 


Value 


Bbla. 


Value 


September, 1903. 










472 

80 

837 


$132 

3' 

282 
















1.050 
3.4SO 
1,100 


$139 
723 
218 












































508 
190 
380 


56 
75 
105 
















1,960 
1.300 


308 
295 








































1, no 


$110 


1,260 


253 


i»8 


87 
















Alaska 


1,008,000 
1,806,000 


$36,000 
60,200 






45o 
«5,5O0 

5" 
13(1,120 


92 

I5.703 
I3_ 

$17,744 


305 
7.417 


189 
2,943 








1 Ji,9*> 


4.538 














2,814.000 


$96,200 


33.030 


$4. (.4* 


10,547 


$3.9<x> 






October, 1903. 














479 

301 

3.147 


$144 

9' 
1,048 












220 


$47 


600 
2,780 
2,200 


$120 
562 

444 




















700 
100 
100 


'59 
18 
23 


























6,690 
200 


1,160 

44 


186 

789 
2 190 
2,581 

300 
10,838 

718 


76 
295 
670 
564 
"5 
3,852 
414 








527 


$34 












































49° 
26,650 

50 
IO 


411 

5,392 

9 

2 








2,772,000 


92,400 


21,766 


2.346 




























2,772,527 


fo*.434 


22,886 


$2,593 


39.270 


$7,847 


21,511 


$7,279 






November, 1903. 














207 

76 

180 


*55 
25 
70 
















5O0 
3,510 

450 
I.OOO 
2,109 


$108 
773 
105 
225 

319 












30 


$8 












































260 
81 
3,806 
200 
197 
526 


98 
41 

840 
50 
49 

167 












































100 


25 




















































160 
2, >4i 

36,250 


34 

365 

7.775 
















550 
11,350 


348 
4.744 








1,974,000 


$65, 800 


18,220 


2,191 





























TO CALIFORNIA 

Is delightful 
Most ways 

Always 

But the way 

Always 

Most delightful 

Is the way 

BY NEW ORLEANS 



Scenic 

The Coast Line 

Quaint Mexican Life 

Sugar and Cotton Plantations 

Sunshine and Balmy Air All The Way 

Louisiana, Texas, Mexico, New Mexico, Arizona. 

Personally Conducted Pullman Tourist Sleepers 

Vestibuled Standard Pullman Sleepers 

Faultless Dining Car Service 

Reclining Chair Cars 

Compartment Car 

Comfort 



SUNSET ROUTE 



SUNSET EXPRESS 



New Orleans to San Francisco Every Day 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC 



i6 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Private Rooms 



Phone Main 5966 



Jules Wittmann 



Jules' Restaurant 



Regular Dinner with wine, 75c. 
Sundays and Holidays, $1.00. 



315 317-319=321-323 

Pine St,. S. F. 



Open Evenings 
Music Sundays 



Tw g.-S. B. EH. Djt. *BimOiHM . 




FOR SALE 



IN 

KERN RIVER, Cheap 

Section 2, 29-28. 

Shaded portion map shows 40 acres three-fourths mile east of 
DISCOVERY WELL. U. S. Patent 22 years. EASY TERMS. 
Cheapest in Kern River. Write at once. 

WESTERN R. 1, CO., 

Room 36 Chronicle Bldg., 

San Francisco. 



ALL 



the oil news 
is our motto 



We have active correspondents in 
each field who send us all the 
news of interest. 



The REPUTATION, 



we have made for our 



ASPHALT 



is UNEXCELLED 



WHY ? Because years of experience have taught us how to 
make it THE BEST. 

nnnnnn 

Our product is known to all large Contractors ; You can 

tread on it in New York, as well as in San 

Francisco. We also ship it to 

Canada and abroad. 



DFH A Or^ITVrr We can AT LEAST meet any quotation 

KbOAfr D1NU made for gooa ASPHAI ^ q WHYf 

Because we own miles of oil territory in 
Sunset District and pipe the oil from our 
wells direct to our refinery. We handle it from the well to the car. 



PRICES: 



nnonnn 

Will be pleased to send samples and quotation on all grades 
from Liquid to the very Hardest. 



JEWETT & BLODGET, 

BAKERSF1ELD, CAL. 



THE 



Pacific Oil Reporter 



is the only 
OIL JOURNAL 
Published on the 
Pacific Coast. 

It gives full, fresh and authentic oil news from 
all the oil districts, new and old. It exposes 
fraudulent oil companies. It gives the latest 
information on oil stocks and dividends. It 
describes the latest method of drilling wells, 
pumping, piping and storing oil; use of oil for 
road making, etc. 

It is the only paper which advocates the belief 
that California's refined asphalt is the equal 
of Trinidad asphalt for paving and other pur- 
poses, and is in every way superior to bitumi- 
nous rock, the use of which has given San 
Francisco, Oakland and other California cities 
so many poor streets. 

The subscription price is $2.50 a year. If you 
are interested in any way in California oil, cut 
out the following coupon, fill in the blank lines, 
and send it. accompanied by check, money 
order or express order to the 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine St. San Francisco 



for- 



f 1 Year $2.90 

Subscription Blank -U months 1.50 

1 3 Months i.oo 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco. 

Please enter my subscription to the Pacific Oil, R8P0MBR 



-atf - 



Signed- 



Address 



Date 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



THE NATIONAL SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

Oil Well Supplies 
Drilling and 
Fishing Tools 

Filler Cables-best in the world 

We carry In stock heavy 7f6-in., 5f£-ln. and 
4}4-in. Boston Casing, in addition to all the 
standard sizes and weights. 6-in., 8-in. and 
io-ln. Boston Drive Pipe always on hand. 

Pacific Coast Headquarters 

117 North Main Street 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Branches: 

Bakersfield, Coalinga and McKlttrlck 



The New 
"Up=to=Date" 



MAPS 



issued by the 
well known 
map makers 



BARLOW & HILL 



will be for sale by the 



Pacific Oil Reporter 

318 Pine St., San Francisco. 



Place your orders early 



California 






Limited 



The comfort-lovers' train 
Built to fit the desires 
of travelers 
Runs to Chicago 



The Scenic Way East 

Through Picturesque 
Indian country, magnificent 
natural scenery and over 
an unsurpassed roadbed 



Santa Fn 



A BUSINESS PROPOSITION 



We all seek the most comforts in 
this life at the minimum expenditure 
of labor or cash. If you are going 
East you will find the 

UNION PACIFIC 

ahead of all others on the above 
basis. At the same time you reach 
your destination quicker. 
Drop me a postal and I will call and 
explain everything. 



S. F. BOOTH, 

General Agent U. P. R. R. Co. 
No. I Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 



i8 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



The Sea of Sahara. 



French engineers have declared it is 
perfectly feasible to convert the Desert 
of Sahara into a vast lake, thus opening 
to commerce great regions of the interior 
of Africa which can now only be reached 
by long, tedious and dangerous caravan 
journeys. They say that a large portion 
of the desert lies below the level of the 
Atlantic, and that by digging a canal to 
let in the waters of the ocean the great 
change could be effected easily, and at a 
cost which would be small compared to 
the bene6ts which would accrue 

If the whole desert lay below the level 
of the Atlantic, the flooding of it would 
create a sea more than four times as big 
as the Mediterranean; but, as the Sahara 
is composed of elevated plateaux, moun- 
tian ranges and depressions, only a part 
would be covered with watei when the 
waves of the. ocean were let in, and the 
new sea thus formed would be an irregu- 
lar body of water, probably of about the 
ssme size as the Mediterranean. Great 
commercial cities would at once spring 
up on its sho"es, and trade and civiliza- 
tion strike at once to the heart of Africa. 
The Sea of Sahara may never become a 
reality, but, in any event, it is a gigantic 
and pleasant dream. — London Answers. 

California Stock and OH 
Exchange. 

The following were the stock sales in 
the California Stock and Oil Exchange 
in the formal sessions held for the week 
ending Wednesday, December 30th. 

ASSOCIATED OIL CO. 

478 at 17 I 81 26 

3,50oat 18 63000 

CHICAGO CRUDE. 
100 at 17 , . . . 17 00 

HOME OIL. 

200 at I 20 240 00 

600 at 1 17 J£ 70500 

ioo at I 07>£ 10750 

ico at 115 115 00 

200 at 1 05 210 00 

825at 101^ 845 5J 

MONARCH. 

839 at 40 335 6o 

i6)at 38 50 83 

PETROLEUM CENTER. 

1,000 at 03 3000 

200 at c.6 1200 

100 at 07 7 00 

REED CRUDE. 

190 at 460 87400 

STERLING. 

100 at 260 26000 

500 at 2 75 (B 90) 1,375 00 



9,192 Shares 



Amount, 15,894.69 



Stock Quotations. 

Following are the latest quotations for 
stocks of oil companies listed on the Cal- 
ifornia Stock and Oil Exchange : 

Oil Stocks, Bid. Asked. 

Alma 

Apollo. 

Asso. Oil Co Stk. Tr. 

Certificates 
Aztec. 

Bay City t5 

Bear Flag 

California Standard . .07 ,11 

Caribou 152^ 1.90 

Central Point Con 

Chicago Crude 

Clairemont 33 .65 

Esperanza ... 1.55 

Fauna . 

Four 67 70 

Fulton 425 

Giant 

Hanford 145 00 

Homestake 

Home 1. 15 1.17% 

Imperial ._. 



Independence ,... .13 

Junction 

Kern 4 50 

Kern River 12.00 

Lion , 

Monarch of Arizona... ,39 

Maricopa 

McKittrick 

Monte Cristo 65 

Nevada .35 

Occidental of West Va 15 

Oil City Petroleum 25 

Peerless 12.00 

Piedmont 

Petroleum Center .... 05 

Pittsburg 

Reed Crude 

Reed Crude, New Issue. 4.55 

S. F. & McKittrick 

San Joaquin O. &D 

Section Seven 

Senator 62 

Shamrock 

Sovereign 37 

Sterling 

Sunset (Or ) 

Superior 05 

Teck . 

Thirty-three 6.75 

Toltec. 19 

Twenty- eight . 

Union 

United Petroleum 

West Shore 

Western Petroleum 

Wolverine 



.15 

.16 

4 75 



.02 



.80 

17 
.28 
13 75 
08 
.09 



3.00 

.72 



.38 



.20 

.07 

1. 00 

7-50 

.20 

4-95 

62.25 



300 



Delinquent Notice. 

HIGH GRAVITY OIL COMPANY. 
— Location of principal place of business, 
San Francisco. Location of works, Holje 
Ranch, San Mateo County, Cal. 

NOTICE. — There are delinquent upon 
the following described stork on account 
of Assessment No. 2 levied on the 18th 
day of November 1903, the several 
amounts set opposite the names of the 
respective shareholders, as follows : 
No. No. 

name Certificate Shares Amt. 

L. A. Frick 28 200 $20 

L- A. Frick 29 300 jo 

F. W. Otten 4s 100 10 

Tillie Otten 46 100 10 

Edward Llyd 48 100 lo 

Lulu Hayer 49 50 5 

Jannie Marshall 55 100 10 

Maud Alh born. .. .57 50 5 

W. C. Alhborn 59 50 5 

Jannie Marshall ..61 loo 10 

And in accordance with law and an or- 
der of the Board of Directors on the 
18th day of November, 19 3 so many 
shares of each parcel of such stock rs 
may be necessary will be sold at public 
auction at the office of the company, 
423 Market St., San Francisco, Califor- 
nia, on the 13th day of January, 1904, at 
the hour of 10 o'clock a. m., of said day, 
to pay delinquent assessments thereon, 
together with cost of advertising and 
expenses of the sale. 

D. ROSENBLUM, 

Secretary. 

Office, ;-J3 Market Street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 



The monthly record of sales since | 
January 1, 1903, is as follows: 

Shares. Va'ue. 

January 267,019 {255, 202 

February 322,443 219,358 

March 199,908 151,982 

April 236,268 1 15, 57 1 

May 401, 454 154. 386 

June 154,720 117,928 

July 74.594 71,89° 

August 181,478 119,231 

September 146, 123 74,455 




ft fe 
Santa Fe 

% V 



ALL THE WAY 

CHICAGO 
In 3 Days 



7:30 
9:30 



Trains leave Union Ferry Depot, San Fran- 
cisco, as follows: 

A. M.— *BAKERSFIKI,D LOCAL; Due 
Stockton 10:40 a. m., Fresno 3:40 p. m., 
Bakersfield 7:15 p. m. Stops at all points 
in San Joaquin Valley. Corresponding 
train arrives 8:55 a. m. 
A. M.-g"THE CALIFORNIA LIMIT- 
ED;" Due Stockton 12:01 p. m., Fresno 
3:20 p. m., Bakersfield 6:00 p. m., Kansas 
City 3rd day 2:35 a. m,, Chicago 3rd day 
2:15 p. m. Palace Sleepers and Dining 
Car through to Chicago. No second class 
tickets honored on this train. Corres- 
ponding train arrives °n : 10 p. m. 
A. M.— *VALLEY LIMITED; Due 
Stockton 12.01 p. m., Fresno 3:20 p. m 
Bakersfield 6:00 p. m. The fastest train 
in the Valley. Carries Composite and 
Reclining Chair Car. No second class 
tickets honored on this train. Corres- 
ponding train arrives 11:10 p. m. 
P. M.— * STOCKTON LOCAL ; Due 
Stockton 7:10 p. m. Corresponding train 
arrives 11:10 a. m. * 

8aa P. M — *OVERLAND EXPRESS ; Due 
Mill Stockton 11:15 P- m-> Fresno 3:15 a. m. 
•VV Bakersfield 7:35 a. m , Kansas City 4th 
day 7:00 a. m., Chicago 4th day 8:47 p. m 
Palace and Tourist Sleepers and free Re- 
clining Chair Cars through to Chicago. 
Also Palace Sleeper which cuts out at 
Fresno. Corresponding train arrives 
6:25 p. m. 
* Daily g Mondays and Thursdays 

Tuesdays and Fridays. 
Personally Conducted Parties for Kansas 
City, Chicago and East leave on Overland Express 
Monday, Thursday and Saturday at 8:00 p. m. 
Ticket Offices, 64: Market Street and in Ferry 
Depot, San Francisco ; and 1112 Broadway 
Oakland. 



WANTED 



A man who will advance cash 
to put down one deep oil well on 
fifty acres of proven land, with 
two wells now pumping 30 grav- 
ity oil. Tools, engines boilers and 
casing on the property free from 
debts ; land patented. Will give 
a large interest in the property 
for the money advanced. 

Apply to 

A. D. EL WELL, 

605 Grant Bldg. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



TO THE EAST 



SUNSET ROUTE 

Means a Trip Taken 

IN COMFORT 

Oiled Track==No Dust 
Oil=Burnin§ Engines 
No Cinders 
No Fi*ost==No Snow 

SUNSET LIMITED 

San Francisco to New Orleans 

EVEBY DAY 

Dining car, meals a la carte 

Observation Car 

Vestibuled Pullman Sleepers 
Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, 

El Paso, San Antonio, 

Houston, Beaumont and 

Texas Oil Fields. 



Southern Pacific 



W. A. BROPHY, 

914 Mutual Savings Bank Bldg., 

708 Market St., San Francisco. 
Telephone, Green 816. 

Petroleum Lands Examined and Re- 
ported on in all Parts of the United 
States. California a Specialty. 



AMERICAN CONSOLIDATED 
Oil Company 

A. B. Butler, J. A. Chanslor, 

President Vice President 



13,750 shares of stock for sale at 
8 cents per share — par value $1.00 



P. W. SPAULDING 

ATTORN LY-AT-LAW 

Evanston - Wyoming 

613 Market St., Sao Francisco. 



Companies Incorporated 

under the lienient laws of 

ARIZONA 

which has the broadest laws of any state. 
Companies can be organized to do busiuess any 
where No personal liability. No limit on capi 
talization. No State examination of books. No 
franchise tax. Stock can be made non-assessable 
and can be issued for services. 

Write for Information and blanks to 
HUGH M. CREIGHTON & CO. 
Phoenix, Arizona. 



Have You Securities 

that pay no dividends and you want 
some that do? If you want to buy, sell 
or exchange investment stocks, or if you 
want gilt-edge shares id operating com- 
panies, address the Debenture Surety 
Company, Rialto Bldg., San Francisco, 
which also incorporates, finances and 
operates good enterprises. 



J. 8. EWEN 

STOCKBROKER 

318 PINE STREET, Room 5 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Member California Stock and Oil Ex- 
change, and San Francisco and Tonopah 
Mining Fxchange. 

TbiBphone Main 1552.. 



Stock, Bond and Investment Syndicate 

(Incorporated) 
Money loaned on Stocks. 

lasted and Unlisted Oil and Mining Stocks 
R. L- CHENEY, Secretary 
514-515 Examiner Building 

San Francisco, California 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 

Designs 

Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. HANDBOOK on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of any scientific Journal. Terms, $3 a 
year : four months, $L Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN &Co. 36,B '- a *" t - New York 

Branch Office, 625 ¥ St., Washington, D. C. 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 5. No. 10 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.. SATURDAY. JANUARY 9 19C4 



Prick, Ten Cknts. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Publlah.il Waaltl* 

T he Ofl A uthoillT of the Psrtfk Coast. 

E tdopMd Bj California Palrnlaaa. Mloara* Aaaoclallnn 



MRS. MARIA ROSA WINN, Proprietor. 

K. S. EASTMAN, 

Rdltor and Business Mim K rr 



OFPICa 1KD RDlTOtlAL ROOMS 

118 Pine Street. San Francisco, California 

Telephone. Bnsh 176. 



Mpkkt should be tent by Postal Order. Draft ir Registered 
Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil Reporter. 318 Pine street San 
Francisco, rooms (1-31-33. Communications most beaccomixinied 
by writer's name and address, not necessarily for publication, 
but as a guarantee of good faith. 

Rntered in the Postoffice at San Francisco, California, >i sec- 
ond class matter. 



McKITTRICK SITUATION SAID 
TO BE CRITICAL. 



STANDARD WILL NOT ABSORB 
THE ASSOCIATED. 



THRMS 

Ok*. Year %t 50 

Six Mouths 150 

T«.aE» Mouths 1 00 

Smoli Conn. 10c 

STRICTLY IN iDVANCB 



What is true of the Kern River field is also 
true of .McKittrick. There is hut one outlet for 
the oil, viz.: The Southern Pacific Railway, and, 
for a period dating from about October 15th 
last, independent operators have been unable to 
secure anywhere near an adequate number of 
cars to transport their oil, and in consequence 
several large contracts for fuel oil, made by the 
independent companies, have been forfeited. It 
seems to be the policy in that field to force the 
independent operators to sell the Standard the 
product and a refusal to do so would result in 
the independent companies being unable to se- 
cure cars on account of the "shortage." It is 
generally understood that there is always a suf- 
ficient number of cars in readiness to- transport 
the oil of the Associated and Standard from Mc- 
Kittrick, presumably for fuel for the Southern 
Pacific, as we do not know what other excuse 
could be given for discriminating against the in- 
dependent operators. That the crisis in .affairs 
u ill come within the next few months is gen- 
erally believed. Just what that crisis will be 
one seems to be able to say but the most plaus- 
able explanation the Reperter can offer is that 
the independent operator will be told that his 
product is not wanted at any price, but that if 
he will sell his property it will be appraised and 
stock issued in payment thereof. Who gets the 
property? 

Federal Government After Mining 
Fakes. 



The Federal Government has knocked one 
mining fake in good style, unfortunately, how- 
ever, not until a great deal of money has been 
lost by investors all over the country. The 
property involved lay in what is known as the 
Wichita Mountains, Oklahoma, which have been 
boomed for some months past "as a gold-bearing 
county." Under the direction of the Depart- 
ment of the Interior, a Government assayer vis- 
ited the ground, and after an examination, re- 
ported that "none of the assays showed ore in 
the proper sense of the word, and that the re- 
gion has no present or prospective value as a 
mineral producer." 



king lit the alleged shortage of cars in the 

Kern river field it mav be said that whatever 

temporary difficulty other producers may have to 

or dispose nt their product, it is 

noted with iust as much significance that the 

ited ( the combine ) is ha\ ing no embar- 
rassment in that respect. They apparently secure 

cars whenever needed and their relations with 

the Standard, so far as can be seen, are perfectly 

harmonious and the possibility of the Assoi 
being absorbed by the Standard is not generally 
credited. The history ol the Standard is (J01 
that of a producer, preferring rather to control 
the market — in fact, to he the market For the 
oil. It is, in fact, the only large purchaser of 
oil from the producer and the only concern from 
which the consumer can purchase in really large 
quantities: The Standard is accustomed to doing 
things on a large scale, and this may account 
for their readiness to purchase large quantities 
of oil for storage in the Kern river field. With 
an immense amount of oil on hand they would 
be in a position to contract the fuel for the 
United States Navy for a considerable term of 
years, or to fill any contract of similar magni- 
tude, and would also he protecting itself against 
any combination of producers by accumulating a 
large reserve supply. The Associated, on the 
other hand, is in the field as a producer, and in 
that field is employing some of the methods 
gained by the Standard by its long experience in 
marketing its oil. The Standard can well af- 
ford to be generous with the Associated know- 
ing that it will be much more satisfactory to do 
business with this combine rather than several 
score of independent producers. 



Oiled Roads Litigation. 

It was decided last Saturday at a meeting of 
representatives from various cities and counties 
of the State to solicit funds to fight the claims 
for royalties on the process of applying oil to 
roads. C. W. Longdon, Chairman of the Board 
of Supervisors of Los Angeles County, presided. 
J. B. Glover, Chairman of the Board of Super- 
visors of San Bernardino County; W. J. Dill- 
man, Chairman of the Board of Supervisors of 
Sacramento County; Charles N. Kirkbride, 
Frederick Baker and Secretary Mason of the 
Special Committee on Oiled Roads Litigation 
named by the League of California Municipal- 
ities, were in attendance. It was unanimously 
agreed that the interests of the whole State de- 
manded that a vigqrous legal fight be made. 



Crude Oil the Fuel. 



Standard Makes Bi£ Deal in West 
Virginia. 

Practically the entire oil production of the 
United States Coal and Oil Company, owning 
property in West Virginia, has been sold at the 
rate of $1,250 per barrel for a net production of 
440 barrels, or $550,000. This purchase is 
thought to have been in the interest of the Stan- 
dard Oil Company, although the trade was ef- 
fected through a Pittsburg broker, the principal 
not appearing. The bid was made and accepted, 
although papers have not actually passed. The 
company retains its 1,000-acre tract. 



The agencies which are bringing to the front 
the greatness of California are too numerous to 
mention, but certainly that which comes next 
to electricity, for the successful enlargement of 
manufactures and the development of great in- 
dustries is fuel oil. The economic effects of this 
oil as a power producer for the industries of the 
State and in the ocean trade have been so stimu- 
lating In the march ot progress that the results 
liave been remarkable beyond all anticipations. 
During 1902 California yielded 13,692,514 bar- 
de oil, while in 1901 the aggregate 
output was 8,754,500 barrels, and in IQOO the 
total was 4,329,950 barrels. While this increase 
seems very large it is not a complete test of the 
capacity of the oil fields. The production has 
been restricted because of inadequate facilities for 
transportation. The increasing use of this oil 
has revolutionized industrial conditions and 
changed commercial affairs. Its influence has 
been felt on both land and on the sea, and its 
sphere of utility is becoming broader every day. 
The low cost of fuel oil as compared to coal 
works a material benefit for the manufacturer. 
From three and a quarter to four barrels of fuel 
oil will do the work and produce as much power 
as one ton of coal. The cost of four barrels of 
fuel oil at San Francisco is from $2.60 to $3, 
while the cheapest steam producing coal costs 
$6.50 to $7.50 a ton. In other words, the fac- 
tories, power companies and all the industries 
where steam power is essential are saving 60 per 
cent of their fuel bill through the use of fuel oil. 
The present average saving is certainly 50 per 
cent. Probably nothing since the discovery of 
gold has done more for the State than the pro- 
duction of this fuel oil. Although the industry 
is still quite largely in its initial stage there are 
companies already in existence which can de- 
liver ten thousand barrels of oil per day. The 
lack of coal in the State and the high cost of im- 
ported coal for steam purposes has been compen- 
sated for by the oil which is now produced in 
such abundance. — Chronicle. 



Better Incorporate Under Another 
Name. 



An eastern oil journal says that as an example 
of the element of luck in oil prospecting, it is said 
that the Interstate Company began the work of 
development in the Prii.ceton, Ind., oil field, be- 
ing the pioneer organization; it has drilled two 
holes, sunk thousands of dollars and received not 
a cent of return in any way. Asphalt in large 
quantities w as found, but it was passed by. Fin- 
ally at a little over 1,400 feet, after months of 
struggling with salt water and with thousands 
of dollars gone for naught, work was abandoned. 
A short time after this the Hoosier Prospect- 
ing Company was formed with the idea of reach- 
ing and developing the asphalt field that had 
been uncovered by the Interstate's drill. They 
found oil instead of asphalt, and since then not 
a drill that has been put down has missed oil. 
A short time ago the Interstate again pulled 
itself together and drilled a hole about 1,000 
yards northwest of their first hole in what was 
believed by experts to he the ideal location. Fail- 
ure resulted. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



NEWS FROM TBE FIELD 



Supplied by our Regular Correspondents 
McKittrick Letter. 




McKittrick, Cal., Jan. 5, 1904. 

That the McKittrick field is in the oil business 
to stay and expects to do business on a generous 
scale is shown by the operations 'of The Associ- 
ated Oil Company. 

On the Giant lease of this company there is 
being completed a new power plant consisting of 
three, one hundred horsepower boilers, equipped 
with every modern appliance. These are to be 
housed in a substantial building of galvanized 
iron, and connected with the plant there will be 
a dynamo furnishing electric lights to the Giant 
and Del Monte leases. 

That this company believes the north end of 
the field has a promising future is furthermore 
shown by their action in moving office buildings 
and main headquarters to the Del Monte lease 
on the southeast one-quarter of section 13. The 
buildings moved from The California Standard 
lease have been augmented by new bunk houses 
and cottages for employees with families, and 
the new camp now presents the appearance of a 
thriving village. 

The Empire well on the southwest one-quar- 
ter of section 8, is in a promising oil sand. If 
this holds out it means the opening up of a large 
territory heretofore unknown. 

Del Monte 54 is proving a wonderful well, 
in that it has over 500 feet of good oil sand. 
This well is somewhat over 1,100 feet deep. 

The completion of Giant No. 10 has been some- 
what delayed, as it was necessary to have new 
parts made for the perforator used. This is the 
Brinkerhoff machine, and though new on the 
market has given entire satisfaction where used. 

Drilling is about to be started on Giant No. 
II, as it is now rigged up for this week. 

Reward No. 3 was recently finished with 
about 100 feet of very lively sand. This well 
has been packed and is flowing a good stream. 
On Reward No. 1 preparations are being made 
to put in an inner string of 7^ casing, as it is 
thought the 9% casing is perforated too much 
to get the best results when pumping. 

The Reward Company has extended its pipe 
line to its lower reservoir, from which point oil 
will be pumped to a new 1,000-barrel tank now 
in course of construction, and next to the two 
1,000-barrel tanks of the Southern Pacific Oil 
Company. 

The Southern Pacific Oil Company has put a 
packer in well No. 15, and the production has 
been greatly increased. The heaving plug in 
No. 16, which had come up in the casing, has 
been drilled out, and it is possible the well may 
be deepened. At any rate a new plug will be 
placed in the bottom. 

Berry & Keller have installed a high pressure 
steam pump for taking oil from their reservoir 
to the guage tanks, and for facilitating the flow 
of oil in the jy$ line they are now laying to the 
Associated tanks. 

The San Francisco and McKittrick Company 
is installing a steam pump at their new reser- 
voir, which will be used for lifting oil to their 
guage tanks. Drilling on well No. 8 of this 
company is progressing satisfactorily. 

Work has been resumed on the Jerome well 
in the southeast quarter of section II, and the 
drill is now in an excellent sand. 



Mr. B. K. Lee has resumed work on the Kern 
King well in the northwest one-quarter of sec- 
tion 11, and has over 100 feet of excellent sand. 

That property holders have faith in the future 
of the northern part of the field is evinced by 
the great amount of assessment work done dur- 
ing the past month. 

Active producers feel very hopeful of an up- 
ward movement in the oil market before many 
months, and all things considered, the coming 
year will doubtless be a very prosperous one for 
this field. "M." 



Bakersfield, Jan. 6, 1904. 

The shortage of cars, or at least the inability 
to get them when wanted at McKittrick, has 
caused a complete shutdown of nearly all the 
principal independent companies in that district. 
The McKittrick, the Reward and the Pacific 
Crude have already closed down and others may 
follow at any time. The Jerome, which was 
drilling a second well on its property, has be- 
come involved in litigation. With the exception 
of that coming from the Associated, scarcely a 
drop of oil is being marketed. 

The oil men are anything but encouraged over 
the outlook. The Associated months ago sur- 
veyed a line from McKittrick to the Coast, pre- 
sumably for a pipe line, but it has never materi- 
alized and the railroad remains the only outlet for 
the district. The field is capable of producing 
enough oil to require two trains a day to haul it, 
but only one is operated. The Southern Pacific 
has storage for half a million barrels, and this is 
now used to its utmost limit. What oil is hauled 
belongs to the Associated almost entirely. The 
combine is shipping what comes from the great 
Shamrock gusher. There are nine flowing wells 
in the field, and their product gets the prefer- 
ence. 

The Associated and the Southern Pacific abso- 
lutely control the situation. The former has 
brought most, if not indeed all, of the oil that 
has been sold for many months past. 

The Temblor district to the north of Mc- 
Kittrick is being abandoned almost entirely. No 
properties are working at present and many of 
the rigs are being removed. No oil was found in 
sufficient quantities to justify the continuation of 
work. A. R. Hinton. 



Kern River Letter. 



Bakersfield, Jan. 6, 1904. 

The Supreme Court has granted the applica- 
tion for the rehearing of the case of Mrs. J. M. 
Crawford versus the Kern Oil Company, which 
was recently decided in favor of the defendant 
corporation. The former decision was written 
by Commissioner Cooper and the case will now 
be heard by the court in bank. It involves the 
question whether in locating a Government sec- 
tion of oil land the lines laid in the survey must 
be the boundaries of the property even if the same 
are not accurate and the land enclosed exceeds 
the usual 160 acres, and even if the locators fur- 
thermore fail to mark the boundaries of their 
claim in exact accordance with the Government 
survey. According to the decision of Commis- 
sioner Cooper the Government survey is to be 
followed in all events. 

There has been very little claim-jumping re- 
ported this year from the several fields of the 
county. One case, however, has occurred in the 
Kern River field, where a location notice was 
posted on 4-29-28 in the southwestern quarter, 
near the properties of the Black Jack, Blinn and 
Gold Standard Companies. The notice was 
signed by prominent local parties. The land 
contains several wells and is quite valuable. 



Some defects in the title is said to be claimed. 

President John M. Wright of the Peerless 
has issued another report to the stockholders, in 
which he states that the company has completed 
wells Nos. 28, 29 and 30 since the last report on 
Oct. 26, 1903, and Nos. 31 and 32 are in course 
of drilling and nearing completion. The discov- 
ery well of the company, N°- 2, is being changed 
to a water well, so that the company has only 
twenty-nine wells pumping oil. No. 3 has al- 
ready been changed into a water well. The third 
power plant of the company has been completed 
by setting up five seventy horsepower boilers on 
the northwest forty acres. A boiler house has 
also been erected over the boilers at the prin- 
cipal pumping station. A large pump has been 
furnished by the Pacific Coast Oil Company, 
which is being used in making regular deliveries. 

When these improvements are complete, Mr. 
Wright says, no other important ones are con- 
templated. The company will continue drilling 
with one crew to keep up production. During 
November this reached 161,285 barrels, and for 
December it was 169,000 barrels. Mr. Wright 
estimates that during the year 1904 the com- 
pany will be able to deliver 200,000 barrels 
monthly, including the 157,000 barrels now in 
the storage reservoirs. Up to November 1st the 
production was less than the contract with the 
Pacific Coast Oil Company called for monthly. 

The report gives some other data in regard to 
the work going on at company's properties at 
Midway and Coalinga. The former has been 
abandoned; the latter is doing well. 

The difficulty which is being encountered in 
getting oil to market by all the companies ex- 
cept those which have steady contracts with the 
Standard continues, the railroad being unable to 
furnish transportation. The great pipe line is 
still idle from Mendota south, and with the out- 
look in sight the amount of development work 
is still curtailed. The result has been a reduc- 
tion in the business being done by the oil well 
supply houses in the city. All admit that this is 
much less than it was a few months since. 

At the same time a great deal of business is 
being done and no well informed person believes 
that the present dull period is more than a tem- 
porary one. 

The Bakersfield Oil and Stock Exchange is in- 
volved in more litigation. A few days since the' 
Helm Company, a loan and trust corporation, 
filed a suit to foreclose a mortgage for $25,000 
on the lot and building owned by the exchange 
in this city. When the building was put up the 
exchange borrowed $25,000 on notes to be paid 
within five years, and gave the mortgage for the 
amount. Recently the exchange became involved 
in litigation with its former secretary, Clarence 
E. Young, W. E. De Groot of Los Angeles and 
E. Sutro of San Francisco, minority stockhold- 
ers, and the Helm Company evidently intends to 
forestall any judgment which might possibly be 
given in this case and protect its own interests. 
It is known that the suit is a friendly one so far 
as the exchange is concerned. 

A. R. Hinton. 



Sunset and Midway Field. 



Bakersfield, Jan. 6, 1904. 

The trouble over the right of way for the 
Sunset Railroad extension has been settled and 
the guards on the disputed property have been 
withdrawn. The Sante Fe is expected to go 
ahead with building operations at once. 

The Internos Oil Company has sued the Oc- 
cidental Oil Company in the Superior Court to 
clear title to the property on the southeast quar- 
ter of section 9-23-23 at Midway. O. B. Boust, 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



J. H. Abbott, A. Weill and others claiming in- 
terest in the property are made co-defendants. 
Another suit brought by the Occidental against 
the I memos is also pending. 

The Parrafine. one of the companies formerly 
operating at Temblor, has moved its tools and 
rig to property on the southwest quarter of the 
southwest quarter of the northwest quarter of 
it Midway, where it will commence 
drilling operations. It will erect a commodious 
bunkhouse and will erect a number of tanks 
lor the product. W. H. Hill of Bakersfield is 
president of the company, and A. W. Gilfillen 
of this city, general manager. Mr. Gilfillen is 
_-eneral manager oi the Areata, which re- 
cently found oil on what was considered the di- 
vide between Sunset and Midway, 

The Altoona has just completed a 6oo-barrel 
reservoir on its property and is making prepara- 
tions to ship oil in the near future. 

1 he Sunset Coast is expected to resume oper- 
ations on its property in the near future. 

It is likely that the well on the King property 
on 18-1 1-23 will he drilled to the second sand 
next month. It is now at a depth of 1,000 feet. 
W nrk will begin about February. 

The Pittsburg at its stockholders' annual 
meeting on Saturday last in this city elected the 
following directors for the ensuing term: W. F. 
Chandler, T. V. Doub, James Culberson, J. W. 
Brockmann, C. L. McGee, W. D. Young and 
H. I. Tupman. W. L. Chandler was chosen 
president ; T. V. Doub, vice-president, and A. 
Weaber, secretary. 

This company for several months paid monthly 
dividends from the money received for the land 
sold to the Fulton, but owing to the building of 
the railroad and pipe line through the Sunset 
field it has been decided to discontinue this policy 
and devote the money to improvements on the 
property instead. A circular announcing this 
change of policy was issued several weeks ago. 

According to the statement of President 
Wright in his last report the Peerless has capped 
and dismantled its well at Midway on account 
of the water encountered, which made its fur- 
ther deepening undesirable. An unimportant 
stratum of oil was encountered at 1,150 feet, and 
a very rich stratum at 1,177, eight feet thick. At 
1,205 the water was encountered in large quan- 
tity, necessitating the virtual abandonment of the 
property. President Wright expresses the opin- 
ion that the property will never be of much 
value as an oil property, owing to its proximity 
to the eastern border of the Midway District. 

At the Fulton property President Wright re- 
ports that the first two reservoirs with an ag- 
gregate capacity of 218,000 barrels, have been 
completed and the company is already pumping 
oil into the first. Wells 3, 4 and 6 are finished 
and are flowing through packers, while 2 and 5 
are in course of drilling. The first six wells are 
estimated as being good for 1,000 barrels a day. 
The company has had a number of offers for dis- 
posing of its product, but has refused all up to 
date. All the treasury stock has been sold, the 
last 10,000 shares bringing $5 each. 

A. R. Hinton. 



Kansas Letter. 



Chanute, Kan., Dec. 31, 1903. 

The closing week of the year proves to be one 
of the busiest of the entire season. Notwith- 
standing it is holiday week, the city is full of 
strangers ; livery turnouts are at a premium ; men 
are "driving" the country over like mad, in 
search of leases, and those farmers who have here- 
to fore held their lands at double, triple and 
quadruple prices, are now amazed to find takers, | 



with the gold in their hands, ready to toss at 
them. Many leases have been secured during the 
past week at from $10 to #20 per acre, and some 
yet remain. The hotels are full of oil men who 
are here from all parts, arranging for work upon 
holdings to begin with the new year. Those who 
are operating cm the outer edge of the proven 
ground around Chanute are happy mortals, feel- 
ing greatly enriched by their lucky finds. The 
almost invariable rule is that those prospectors 
have brought in producing wells, thus widening 
what has hern lung conceded to be the largest 
known oil field of this country. Some new ter- 
ritory has been opened, as will be noticed from 
the items below, while in the immediate Chanute 
fields, we point with pride to two of the best 
producing wells in this section, the Hudson gush- 
er and the West Plant well No. 18, the former 
making 200 barrels per day, and in the latter oil 
stands 700 feet, and cannot be bailed out. 

A gang of thirty-five men are laying the new 
six-inch pipe line between Chanute and Neodesha. 
It is being put together on top of the ground, 
and will afterward be buried some eight inches 
under the surface. 

Oil was discovered on the Silicon farm, four 
miles south of Altamont, at a depth of about 
100 feet. It was shot, and oil rose some ten 
to twenty feet in the well. 

The Santa Fe Oil Company brought in Camp- 
bell No. 4, and have let contract for Nos. 5 and 
6 to be drilled at once. 

The Ajax Company, with holdings north of 
the city, brought in a fair oiler on the 23rd. 

The Junction Oil Company brought in a good 
oiler the 26th, on their holdings in the southeast 
field. Eighty feet of sand was penetrated, forty 
feet of which was oil-bearing. The company has 
a pumping plant already installed. 

The Commonwealth Company brought in a 
good oiler on the Russell land the 24th inst. 

A great deal of work is being done in the 
Urbana fields. Drilling rigs are seen in every 
direction from that town, and scarcely a hole is 
put down that fa'ls to produce results. On 
Christmas day the well immediately east of the 
depot sent forth a sudden strong flow of gas, to 
the surprise of the drillers, who were expecting 
a strike of oil. The town is all the more pleased, 
however, as this will enable them to have the 
much coveted gas fuel. Wells are going down 
on the McCord farm, north of the city, and 
another on the Dr. lies farm, one mile west of 
town. (Later reports state the gas well is losing 
strength and will not be strong enough to be 
of value.) 

The Syndicate Oil Company shot a well on 
section 30, near Benedict, in Woodson county, 
on the 24th inst. When shot it spouted oil over 
the derrick, but the flow did not continue. It is 
reported to be a twenty-barrel well. 

A drilling rig belonging to George Pence was 
destroyed by fire on the 24th inst on the Cross 
farm, two miles south of Chanute, while drilling 
on well No. 4. Gas was struck, the force of 
which was so great as to excite and confuse the 
drillers, and unfortunately, became ignited in 
some way. The other three wells on the hold- 
ings are all good oilers. 

The Hoosier Oil Company is a new company 
just organized and having holdings in the Aus- 
tin (Southeast) field. It is composed and of- 
ficered by Iola and La Harpe men. They will 
drill at once. 

The Boss Oil Company, with holdings south- 
west of Chanute, are putting down a well which 
they confidently believe will be a gusher, on the 
ground that they are in line with several heavy 
producers directly north, in the same trend. 
A well on the Braden lease, northeast of the 



City, was brought in the 28th. This well was 
drilled some time ago, hut some of the tools 
were lost and there was a job of fishing, which 
lasted several weeks. When shot, the oil 
spouted some thirty feet over the derrick. It 
« is immediately connected up and will be 
pumped by compressed air system. 

The Producers' Consolidated Companj 
elected the following officers on the evening of 
the 26th: H. J. Mathews, president: B. H. 
Grigsby, vice-president; E. E. McMahan, secre- 
tary and treasurer. They have holdings north- 
east of the city. 

Well No. 5 of the Petrolia Oil Company, lo- 
cated in the Urbana fields, was shot on the morn- 
ing of the 29th, and proved a good one. This 
company is installing its pumping plant, which 
they say will be ready for use in about ten days. 

The Heath Oil Company, with holdings on 
Big Creek, about eight miles south of the city, 
are operating with two drillings rigs. They 
brought in their first well last week, which 
proved an oiler, and filled the hearts of the pro- 
moters with glee. 

The Sheldahl Company, with holdings in the 
northeast field, shot their well, No. 4, on the 
23rd, which made a fine showing. The com- 
pany is installing a pumping plant. 

News comes from Coffeyville that they are 
making a rich find of oil near this town. The 
Atlas Crude Oil Company filled a tank car from 
the company's private pipe line, which is con- 
nected up with their several wells, by spasmodic 
flowing. None of the wells has as yet been 
pumped. The oil tests high and is quoted at 
$1.37 per barrel ;. depth of wells about 400 feet; 
run of sand, from thirty to sixty feet. 
• The citizens of Neosho Falls have at last 
brought in their test well, which proves to be a 
strong oiler, making from twenty to fifty bar- 
rels. A company is now organizing and develop- 
ment will proceed. 

Talk is being revived of piping gas from the 
Chanute field to Fort Scott. The commissioners 
of Neosho county have passed a resolution deny- 
ing the privilege of crossing the public highway 
with pipe intended for the transmission of gas 
outside the boundaries of Neosho county. 

The Earlton Oil Company, seven miles south 
of Chanute, had success with their first well (a 
fifty-barrel well) that the company sold enough 
stock at 25 cents per share to pay for their sec- 
ond well and install a small pumping plant. 
Well No. 2 is now down about 300 feet. Their 
holdings comprise 240 acres, directly on the pipe 
line. J. S. Detwiler. 



Big Victory for Rockerfeller— Gould 
Trust. 



A dispatch from New York says that the Rock- 
efeller-Gould interests, in control of the Colorado 
Fuel and Iron Company, have won a signal vic- 
tory in their efforts to induce the holders of the 
debenture bonds to agree to an increase in the 
capitalization which was distinctly prohibited in 
one of the indentures of the mortgage. The ap- 
plication to the stock exchange by the Conti- 
nental Trust Company made to-day to list the 
receipts for the deposits of debenture bonds was 
for $14,068,000. The total issue of the deben- 
ture bonds is $14,500,000 showing that less than 
$500,000 are still held by original owners. The 
plan for putting out the new bond issue will be 
carried through at once irrespective of opposition 
which may come from the remaining outstanding 
bondholders. An action is threatened by the 
minority, but it is argued that the controlling 
interest in the property will pull their plan 
through and if necessary deposit a bond with 
the courts to secure the non-assenting holders 
from loss and then fight the matter out in the 
courts after the new capital has been issued. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 




Recent Developments in California Fields. 

Colusa. 

The work of sinking for "pay oil" is still be- 
ing prosecuted in Colusa and Glenn counties. At 
present there are three wells being sunk in Colusa 
and one in Glenn. 

The Williams Company has bought a new 
cable and will endeavor to fish its tools out and 
go 200 feet deeper. Failing to get pay oil they 
will try in another location. 

Another string of casing is being put in the 
Washington-California oil well in Glenn county. 
There is 2,000 feet of water in the hole. That's 
its depth now. 

The Chehalis Oil Company is putting in an- 
other string of casing. Under its present su- 
perintendent, J. H. DufKeld, and drillers, better 
results have been attained than formerly. Mr. 
Duffield has been tireless in his devotion to the 
work, so that the men under him would lose 
but little time waiting for casing or other needed 
material. The result has been the best record of 
work ever performed in this field. Could the 
thousands of dollars that were earlier expended, 
been as judicially spent under competent direc- 
tion and drillers, quite a different story might 
now be told. 

Superintendent Duffield was here Wednesday. 
He announced that the drilling in the Chehalis 
oil well would be resumed next Tuesday. — Inde- 
pendent. 

Half Moon Bay. 

The Wisconsin Company will begin the drill- 
ing of several new wells as soon as the weather 
permits. 

The Duchess Oil Company will begin drilling 
of a number of wells early in the spring. The 
supplies and material have already been pur- 
chased. 

The High Gravity Oil Company continue to 
pass through the best of indications for a good 
strike. The President, James Parker, who is a 
thorough oil man, states that prospects are very 
flattering, as they are still going through oil 
sand. 

The Paxton Company has several wells, one 
of which is nearly completed, but which is tem- 
porarily closed while waiting for another string 
of pipe. They have one other well which is pro- 
ducing several barrels of oil per day, yet they 
have not struck oil sand. 

The derricks and drilling rigs at the gusher 
which -were destroyed by fire, have been replaced 
by new ones. Machinery and supplies to con- 
tinue the work are on the ground and are being 
placed in shape for active operations as speedily 
as possible. — Coast Advocate. 

Los Angeles. 

Two oil refining plants, a roofing establish- 
ment and a paint factory will be the principal as- 
sets of a new company now being organized. 
For several weeks A .W. E. Thompson and his 
associates have been attempting to bring about 
a merger of these establishments. The success 
of such a scheme would mean much for the local 
refinery business. The plans provide for the 
merger of the new Franklin refinery, the Texas 
and California refineries, the Franklin roofing 
plant and the Franklin paint factory, with a 
capitalization of $1,000,000. The new company 
would have a capacity for handling at least 9,000 
barrels of oil a month for refining purposes alone. 
It would also handle much crude oil in the manu- 



facture of roofing and paints, and would become 
an important factor in the market. 
Ventura. 
The oil business promises to pick up quite ma- 
terially before a great while in this vicinity unless 
all signs fail. The Pacific Coast Oil Company 
has secured the production of the Westlake- 
Rommell, Pure Oil Company and Bard Oil and 
Asphaltum Companies. The Bard wells have 
been shut down for a long time, almost a year; 
its machinery being idle, but will shortly begin 
operations again. 

The terms on which these deals were com- 
pleted are said to include a price of 62I4 cents 
for 22 degree oil, with an additional 2% cents 
or every half degree increase in gravity. The 
Empire, Uncle John, Olmstead, Capitol Crude 
and Union Consolidated wells will begin drilling 
almost at once and expect to keep up a steady 
lick for some time to come. 

Sulphur Mountain folks have been having a 
good deal of difficulty by reason of crooked holes 
and troubles with casing, rendering progress 
necessarily slow, but they are now down over 
200 feet and think their troubles are over. 

R. D. Boyer struck a strong flow of salt water 
in his Magee Canyon well a few days ago, and 
will be compelled to move his rig. The Saltmarsh 
No. 7 began a good flow of oil a few daj's ago at 
a depth of 450 feet. The well is not yet down 
to its full depth, but will be pumped for the 
present. The outfit of the Searchlight Company 
which operated for a short time in the Sespe 
country two years ago, was sold to Thomas 
Hughes of Los Angeles and removed to Santa 
Maria. The California Tool Company has pur- 
chased the Windsor outfit. F. C. Richardson 
and N. O. Say, formerly stockholders in the 
Saltmarsh Canyon Oil Company, have disposed 
of their holdings to E. P. Foster of Ventura; 
price was unobtainable. 

The Whidden-Double Company will also soon 
begin drilling again after a protracted shut- 
down. 

The above are only samples of the activity 
that is beginning to be manifested in local oil 
circles, and it is very likely that the coming year 
will see increased operations and even new de- 
velopments of local oil fields. — Free Press. 
Whittiep. 

From Whittier comes the announcement, and 
based on the most reliable authority, that sev- 
eral of the large oil producing companies of that 
place, backed by a strong syndicate from Scran- 
ton and Wilkesbarre, Pa., have in contempla- 
tion the erection of a large refinery near Whit- 
tier for the purpose of utilizing the product of 
the companies interested in the manufacture of 
high grade illuminating oils as well as lubricat- 
ing oils of various grades, such as spindle oil, ma- 
chinery and engine oils and cylinder stocks. In 
connection with the refinery it is proposed to 
erect a large plant for the manufacture of car- 
bon, as tests have shown that the highest grade 
of carbon made can be obtained from the Whit- 
tier oil, worth in the market from $300 to $500 
per ton. The asphaltum produced from the 
Whittier oil, as several of the Los Angeles re- 
fineries prove, is of a very superior quality and 
a ready market for all that can be produced is, 
of course, assured. The project embraces also 
the building of a pipe line to the Coast, a dis- 
tance of about twenty miles, from which point 
cheap transportation can be secured to Coast 
points. For some time samples of Whittier oil 
have been shipped east and refined and the re- 
sults realized have been so satisfactory that the 
above mentioned enterprise was put on foot 
about two months ago and parties largely in- 
terested in the Whittier field made an extended 



trip east with a view to interesting eastern capi- 
tal, and that the mission was a success is known 
from the confidence expressed as to the outcome 
of the undertaking. A plant of this character 
erected in the light oil fields of Southern Cali- 
fornia would tend at once to advance the price of 
the crude product and Whittier oil men espe- 
cially are well pleased with the prospects, and 
the people of Whittier in general look with favor 
on the proposition. 

Wyoming. 

Attorney Spence of this city has just com- 
pleted the organization of the Wyoming Oil & 
Land Syndicate, and among its stockholders are 
numbered some of the wealthiest Eastern finan- 
ciers. The company starts out on a firm business 
basis, and will sell sixty shares at $200 each, for 
a starter. This money will be sufficient to put 
down a well 1,500 feet in depth. If this well 
should prove a "duster" another allotment of 
stock will be placed on the market and work 
prosecuted as in the first instance. The com- 
pany owns several hundred acres of land in the 
oil fields of this county, and there is no reason 
why it should not prosper. 

A courrier who came in from the Bettys well 
on Thursday announced that a large volume of 
high grade oil was seeping through the large 
quantity of water that is now contained in the 
casing. He says that a hard formation had just 
been encountered and immediately the oil started 
coming to the surface. It is hard to calculate 
what the strike amounts to owing to the large 
amount of water in the well at the present time. 
However, it is the intention to make arrange- 
ments to shut off this water at once, w 7 hen a bet- 
ter idea can be had of the importance of the 
strike. 

The American Consolidated Oil Company has 
called the annual meeting of their stockholders in 
San Francisco on January 11. 

Those who had not lived up to the law gov- 
erning the locating of placer claims were out in 
the hills in full force on Thursday. Early in 
the morning heavily loaded wagons were seen to 
leave town for the mountains, and in many in- 
stances tents, cooking utensils, etc., made up the 
luggage. Many of those who went to the oil 
fields returned yesterday, but an army will stay 
in the hills for several days, scouring the country 
for land that may have been overlooked in the 
excitement. 

The excitement attending the relocating of oil 
lands in this field was even more aggressive than 
last year. This activity indicates that the people 
are more confident in the ultimate success of our 
oil fields than ever before. Many easterners were 
on the ground with large forces of men to re- 
locate their lands. As far as we are able to learn, 
two representatives of New York capitalists, ten 
from California, six from Michigan, four from 
Ohio and twenty from Utah were in the field 
on the first of the year to protect their interests. 
This augures well for the importance of our com- 
ing industry, when men will come thousands of 
miles to protect our prospective territory. 

As far as we are able to learn there were no 
serious conflicts, although the "skinner" was 
quite promiscuous. The "skinner" is the indi- 
vidual who comes along at the tail-end and double 
files on land just because he is mean or hasn't 
better sense. He is here in one or two instances, 
but it is mighty unhealthy for him. 

A message from Basin, Wyoming, says that 
the strike made by the Bonanza Oil Company, 
twenty-five miles from that place, has caused a 
rush to the new field and a large number of 
claims are being staked and recorded. It is ex- 
pected that when the first of the year dawns 
there will be much claim-jumping, as a large 



PACIFIC OIL RKPORTKR 



number of claims are Mil h> parties who have 
tailed to perton There are 

The toll. 
that two nf the gentlemen heavily in- 

• our leadinf .ire in 

s trouble: 

and John Jaeger, well-known 

ghout the Unit 
brokers and promoters, were arrested to-d 
the complaint of Postoffice Inspector Ketcham, 
on the charge of using the mails me to 

defraud. The arrests were ordered by the 
ernment officials after an inquiry had hern made 
into the business methods of tin- Model Gold 
Mining Company ami the Jaeger Oil Company, 
of which concerns Frank Jaeger is president ami 
treasurer, and John Jaeger secretary. More than 
- involved in the case, and the Federal 
authorities declare that sensational revelations 
will he made when the prisoners are arraigned 
in court. The brothers were taken before a 
I nited States Commissioner. Their bonds were 
lived at $3,000 each, and they were released on 
bail. Inspector Ketcham said to-day that he did 
not make the claim that the several Jaeger prop- 
erties are of no value, but that the representa- 
tions as to the earnings of the properties are 
fraudulent. The inspector said : 'These men have 
been using the mails to make representations 
about all the properties, the only one of which 
our investigation showed had money being the 
McCabe mine, near Prescott, A. T. We charge 
that sales of stock on the strength of advertising 
matter have been made entirely under false pre- 
tenses. President Frank Jaeger said : 'The ar- 
rest of myself and my brother is purely spite 
work. A couple of dissatisfied stockholders 
wished to disrupt the company. We have made 
no misrepresentations and we will bring heavy 
damage suits against somebody.' " 



Cost of Texas Oil Development. 



It is next to impossible to form an estimate 
of the legitimate expense attached to the direct 
development of the oil fields — such as the cost of 
property, wells, pumping stations, labor, etc. — 
but, as there have been 550 wells drilled on 
Spindle Top, more than 300 at Sour Lake and 
10 at Saratoga, or a total of 860, not counting 
the "wildcats," the figures must be near $9,- 
OOO.OOO. The early wells on Spindle Top cost 
$10,000, and the expense of drilling has been 
scaled down until $5,000 may now be called a 
fair average per well. At Sour Lake the aver- 
age will not be above $3,500, and at Saratoga 
the same. However, counting in the cost of the 
land, flow lines, pumping equipment, etc., the 
average cost per well cannot be figured at less 
than $10,000, and this would bring the total up 
to $8,600,000. 

The items of investment which have been enu- 
merated, although incomplete, show the expendi- 
ture of $33,750,000. In this amount is in- 
cluded a dead investment of probably $6,000,000, 
representing money that was recklessly expended 
in the Spindle Top field, where only 127 of the 
550 wells that have been drilled are being oper- 
ated. The failure of so many wells on Spindle 
Top may be attributed in large measure to the 
fact that they were drilled on pieces of land 
scarcely large enough to accommodate a derrick. 
For instance, on the ten acres of the much-ad- 
vertised Hogg-Swayne tract of fifteen acres there 
were at one time 200 derricks and 150 pumping 
rigs. To-day only eleven wells in this tract are 
being pumped. 

There are a number of refineries near Beau- 
mont which are engaged in refining Texas oils, 



but the ch to date 1 

fuel. 1 1 

ana crude, also ke: 

ne and various other products. 
1 he Standard 1 )il Company is taking from 

.rude and 
solar oils t., New York each month by tank 
m Port Arthur and Sabine Pass. The 
Guffey Company is shipping as much as 4i».,,s». 
barrels a month bj water to New York, Phila- 
delphia. Beverly, Mass.; New Orleans and for- 
eign ports. The presumption is that most of the 
oil shipped by the big companies to eastern and 

n ports is to be used for fuel. An average 
ot one cargo in two months goes b) the Shell 
I ransport and Trading Company's tankers in 
England. The Shell Company's steamers 
large capacity, earning s,s,. ( xx> t.. i«\ 
of oil. Texas oil is also shipped to 1 lax anas, 
Cuba and to Alexandria, Egypt In New York 
and Philadelphia it is employed to making 
for which it is especially valuable. Hut the 
greatest benefits resulting from the discovery of 
these new fields have been felt by the Texas and 
Louisiana country within a radius of 300 miles 
from Beaumont. Cheap fuel is necessary to the 
full development of the rich resources of the 
Texas and Louisiana coast country, and the open- 
ing up of the oil fields has provided this fuel. It 
is used in the sugar mills and rice farm irriga- 
tion plants with great success, reducing the cost 
of fuel in some instances as much as 50 per cent. 
In New Orleans it is used in manufacturing 
plants, power plants and on the tugs which ply 
the Mississippi. In Houston, San Antonio, Dal- 
las, Fort Worth and Galveston, the principal 
cities of Texas, it is also used by the mills, power 
plants and manufacturing establishments. 



Great vVaste of Natural Gas. 



A curious case known as the Louisville Gas 
Company vs. the Kentucky Heating Company 
has just been decided in favor of the latter by the 
Court of Appeals at Frankfort, Ky. The case 
grew out of alleged efforts of the Louisville Gas 
Company to destroy the Meade county natural 
gas fields, from which the Kentucky Heating 
Company has been taking the gas it furnishes 
to consumers in Louisville. 

The former company took over a number of 
leases of land made in the county. In this ter- 
ritory it erected what it called a lampblack fac- 
tory. 

When it began operations the Kentucky Heat- 
ing Company had a gas pressure of sixty pounds, 
and in five months this was reduced to thirty 
pounds. 

In five months the factory produced 300 
pounds of lampblack, worth 4 cents a pound, 
and had consumed about 90,000,000 feet of na- 
tural gas. The lampblack was never shipped 
from the factory. 

On these facts the chancellor enjoined the 
operation of the lampblack factory as violating 
the laws against wasting natural gas. 



Tth Standard and the Russian 
Trade. 

I he- Petroleum ays that no sooner it 

'•* proved that the production of the Pennsylvania 
fields is rapidly declining, than the Roumanian 
produces, as a „ !„,],._ c<mu . forward and offer 
their fields to the company in order to assist 
them to maintain their supremacy as distributors 
Of petroleum throughout the world. The 
ernment, however, interfere,! in the matter, and 
in the end, and as a result of such interference, 
the proposal was negatived. Immediately after- 
wards from another quarter comes a similar offer, 
'his time made by the Galician producers, but 
for the time being there is no indication that any 
tangible decision has been arrived at. To-day, 
however, we are enabled to give publicity to an 
otter made to them by a representative of the 
Russian producers, though we would make it 
dear a* rl " tsel that this has nothing what- 
ever to do with the rumors which are prevalent 
m the city, and in connection with which the 
names of the Russian Petroleum and Liquid Fuel 
Company and the Baku Russian Company are 
mentioned, while secondly we do not entertain 
the idea that the Standard Oil Company con- 
templates acquiring properties under the disguise 
of any other name than its own. It seems to us 
that they are more inclined to buy their Russian 
oil in the open market, rather than purchase Rus- 
sian territory, refineries, etc., and no doubt the 
step which they have recently taken in buying 
something like 200,000 tons of Russian illuminat- 
ing oil in Baku, indicates their desire to fill the 
gap created by the decline of the production of 
the Pennsylvanian fields in this way. In the im- 
portant proposal to which we have already re- 
ferred, there are many points worthy of very 
careful consideration, but two stand out very 
prominently — the question of the insecure legal 
position of the English companies in Russia and 
their mismanagement. No doubt these two sub- 
jects will receive full explanation at the hands 
of the chairman of the Russian Petroleum and 
Liquid Fuel Company at next Tuesday's meet- 
ing, but at the same time we personally do not 
feel any alarm with regard to the first, for al- 
though there is provided a certain clause whereby 
the Russian Government may revoke the per- 
mission given to the English companies to work 
in Russia, we at the same time recollect that the 
Russian Government may also take arbitrary 
steps with reference to the Russian companies 
in which they could not appeal, but in the case 
of the English companies a protest could always 
be proceeded with through the Government. 
The second important point only requires a few 
words from us. A number of warnings have 
reached our office with regard to the policy pur- 
sued by some companies of substituting local em- 
ployes by Englishmen. The complaint is not so 
much as to the desirability of the change, but 
against the way in which this is carried out, for 
however capable an Englishman may be, it stands 
to reason that on foreign soil he is much inferior 
to the men who by long acquaintance with the 
methods adopted in the various branches of the 
industry, possess knowledge an Englishman can 
never hope to acquire. 




BATES' 

PATENT CASING TONGS 



1416-1486 19th St., BaUersiield, Cal. 



Fills a long-felt want. No more need of 
pole and rope f >r screwing up casing. Bates 
Tongs can be applied to the easing anywhere 
in driving or pulling without danger of injury 
or parting casing. 

Set No. r, with any two size jaws from 9$^ 
to 13^ inches. 

Set No. 2, with any two size jaws from 
9f6 inches. 



6 



PACIFIC OIL. REPORTER 



Report of the Peerless and Fulton 
Companies. 



John M. Wright, president of the Peerless 
and Fulton Companies, has issued the following 
interesting report to the stockholders: 

KERN RIVER PROPERTIES. 

Since the issuance of report No. 51 on Octo- 
ber 26, 1903, the following improvements have 
been made at Kern River Peerless wells. 

1. Three new wells, 28, 29 and 30, have 
been completed, but as oil well No. 2, our dis- 
covery well, is being changed into a water well, 
we have only 29 pumping oil wells. 

2. Power plant No. 3 has been completed 
by the setting up of five seventy horsepower boil- 
ers on the northwest forty. 

3. Oil well No. 3 has been changed into a 
water well, and it is known now as water well 
No. 5. 

4. A boiler house has been erected over the 
boilers at our principal pumping station. 

5. The Pacific Coast Oil Company has fur- 
nished us a large pump, which has been set up 
and is being used in making our regular deliv- 
eries. 

6. Wells 31 and 32 are drilling and are near- 
ing completion. 

DEVELOPMENT COMPLETE. 

After the completion of wells 31 and 32, the 
changing of oil well No. 2 into a water well and 
the building of a boiler house at power plant 
No. 3 and a pump house over our pipe line pump, 
we shall continue drilling with one drilling crew 
in order to keep up production, but no other im- 
portant betterments are contemplated. 
PRODUCTION. 

Up to November i, 1903, our production was 
less monthly than the amount deliverable month- 
ly on our contract with the Pacific Coast Oil 
Company; but during the month of November 
our production was 161,285 barrels. We pro- 
duced 168,297 barrels during December, and 
we expect to deliver 200,000 barrels per month 
throughout the year 1904, including the 158,500 
barrels in our reservoirs now. 

MIDWAY-PEERLESS. 

In our well on this property we encountered 
an unimportant stratum of oil sand at 1,150 feet; 
at 1,177 feet we reached a stratum of rich oil 
sand eight feet thick, but at 1,203 feet we en- 
countered water in quantity so great as to make 
undesirable the further deepening of the well; 
and we have therefore capped and dismantled it 
until other developments shall enable us to deter- 
mine our course. The indications are now that 
this property is too near the eastern border of 
the Midway oil belt to become of great value 
as oil property. 

FULTON WELLS. 

Fulton wells 1, 3, 4 and 6 have been completed 
and perforated. Each is flowing through a 
packer and all are good producers. No. 2 is also 
a flowing well, but Nos. 2 and 5 are still in 
process of drilling. Our first six wells are good 
for an aggregate flow of about 1,000 barrels per 
day. These wells must be allowed to flow until 
the gas pressure relaxes, after which they may be 
pumped. 

Reservoirs 1 and 2, with an aggregate capacity 
of 218,000 barrels, are completed, and for sev- 
eral weeks our production has been pumping into 
No. 1. 

The grading of the Sunset Railroad Com- 
pany's extension has been completed across the 
southwest corner of our property and we have 
every reason to expect that trains will be run- 
ning across our property by the time our reser- 
voirs can be filled with oil. 

All the treasury stock of this company has 



been sold, the last 10,000 shares for $5.00 each. 

We have our choice of several desirable meth- 
ods of disposing of our oil at a profit, but so far 
all offers have been refused. 

The improvements on this property now in- 
clude a bank of two boilers with boiler house, 
four wells completed, two wells drilling, two 
wells (7 and 8) with derricks and rigs completed 
ready for drilling, two reservoirs completed, two 
bunk houses completed, and a large stable with 
corral. 

COALINGA-PEERLESS. 

The first indication of oil in Coalinga-Peerless 
well No. 1 was reached on December 24th, when 
a strong flow of gas was encountered, and a day 
or two later excellent oil was struck in quantity 
at 855 feet. Work on the well has been shut 
down until the arrival of a carload of casing. 
The gravity of the oil found is above 20 degrees 
Beaume', but nothing can be announced as to 
quantity nor anything as to price until completion 
of the well. 

The Standard oil delivery lines have been ex- 
tended to the adjoining property. 

In the opinion of the management the striking 
of oil in this well is the most important event in 
the history of Peerless Oil Company since the 
striking of oil in our first discovery well, the 
well above mentioned as Kern River Peerless 
well No. 2. Very respectfully, 

John M. Wright, President. 



Report of Directors of California 
Combined Oil Company. 



The following report has been made by the 
directors of the California Combined Oil Com- 
pany to its stockholders: 

The board of directors of said corporation de- 
sire to communicate to you the following as to 
the actions taken by the stockholders and the 
board of directors, and as to the general condi- 
tion of affairs of the company: 

At a special meeting of the stockholders held 
November 16, 1903, at which over two-thirds of 
the issued capital stock of said corporation was 
represented, the capital stock was reduced from 
$1,000,000 to $300,000. 

Owing to the fact that, during the months of 
September and October, 1903, unexpected ex- 
penses were incurred by reason of difficulties en- 
countered, accidents and misfortunes met with in 
an earnest endeavor to push the well to comple- 
tion. Among which were the telescoping of cas- 
ing which caused the well to be flooded by water 
and necessitating the drawing of some of the 
casing, the loss of some expensive tools in the 
well and the expenses incurred in an effort to 
recover these tools, and other hinderances and 
all causing large expenses to the company which 
were not and could not have been anticipated 
or provided for at the time of the stockholders' 
meeting held September I, 1903, and the board 
finding that the moneys derived from assessments 
Nos. 6 and 7 would be insufficient to complete 
the well and put the company upon a safe basis, 
and realizing the necessity of securing further 
funds to meet the emergency the board called a 
special meeting of the stockholders for November 
30, 1903, to consider and take such action as 
might be necessary in the interest of the com- 
pany. 

That pursuant to the call of said board, of 
which notice was duly given by publication, a 
special meeting of the stockholders was held at 
the office of the company on November 30, 1903, 
at 2 o'clock p. m. at which over two-thirds of the 
outstanding stock of the company was repre- 
sented, at which meeting the stockholders repre- 
sented voted unanimously to levy one or more 



assessments after Jan. 1, 1904, as the board of 
directors might in their judgment deem neces- 
sary, for the purpose of securing sufficient funds 
to complete the well and put it on the pumps. 

The board of directors at its regular monthly 
meeting held Dec. 3, 1903, at which all the mem- 
bers of the board were present, realizing the ne- 
cessities of the company occasioned by the dif- 
ficulties above referred to and desiring to pro- 
mote the best interests and secure the success 
of the company, voted unanimously to cut off all 
salaries of officers, including members of the 
board from Dec. 1, 1903, thereby reducing the 
expenses to the minimum. 

PRESENT CONDITION. 

All expenses and liabilities of the company 
have been fully paid to this date, and there is 
now in the treasury about $1,100 in cash. The 
mortgage on the land has also been paid off and 
the mortgage released of record. It is the de- 
sire and intention of the board to hold the amount 
now on hand — subject only to the payment of 
such expenses as may necessarily be incurred in 
caring for the property of the company and con- 
ducting its office business — and to accumulate 
enough money with which to complete the well 
before proceeding further with active work, and 
then, when sufficient funds have been accumu- 
lated and in the treasury, to let a contract for the 
completion of said well, requiring a bond of the 
contractor for the faithful performance of his 
contract and to deposit the contract with a cer- 
tified check for the contract price to be paid only 
upon the completion of the work according to the 
contract. 

The books and accounts of the secretary with 
his vouchers for assessments Nos. 6 and 7 have 
been examined and found correct. 

THE OUTLOOK OF THE OIL INDUSTRY OF CALI- 
FORNIA. 

The oil industry of this State has passed the 
experimental stage and has settled down to a 
legitimate and permanent industry — in the Kern 
River District, where our works are, there are 
constant and permanent improvements being 
made, wells being put down, oil being produced 
daily in large and increasing quantities ; vast res- 
ervoirs for the deposit of crude oil, some of which 
cover ten acres of land each ; the building and 
completion of an oil refinery, which it is said will 
be the largest one of its kind in the world, and 
will be constructed as soon as an enterprise so 
extensive can be completed, the cost of which is 
estimated at $2,000,000 or more. 

The board is satisfied and gratified with the 
outlook for the future of the oil business and 
with the prospects of ultimate success of our en- 
terprise. J. H. Edson, Secretary.. . 



Will Rockerfeller Control Smelter 
Trust? 



According to a Denver dispatch, it is rumored 
that John D. Rockefeller will come into full con- 
trol of the American Smelting & Refining Com- 
pany at the next meeting, to be held shortly, and 
that with the coming in of the control of the 
Rockefellers the Guggenheims will step down and 
out. The Rockefeller interest is represented by 
the United States Metals Selling Company, of 
which the Standard Oil magnate is the moving 
spirit. If this new invasion of the mining field 
by the trust idea prevails, the Standard Oil 
man will be able to control both the metal mar- 
ket and the market price. The average pro- 
ducer of ore has had sufficient complaint against 
the smelter trusts so-called, but there is little 
reason to believe that his complaints will be 
made less if the change above noted takes place. — 
Mining World. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Fuel Report For 1908. 



The quantity g the 

year 

certained by referring to the figures below, this 
cannot be | fuel to (ill 

our requirement- el oil which 

has been produced tb : cent 

in excess of the products of lOCO, hence the 
show ing made tor the coal consumption cannot 
be accepted as being i discouraging one tor manu- 
facturing interests locally. The earl) portion nl 
-his year labor disturbances developed them- 
- in the British Columbia Collieries; these 
were not amicablv compromised tor some con- 
siderable time, as the manager of the Wellington 
Collieries showed a disposition to maintain his 
rights rather than make concessions, although 
at a serious loss to himself; the laborers finally 
acceded to his demands. The abrogation of the 
duty ot 67 cents per ton on Australian ami Brit- 
ish Columbia coals, has proved for the year a 
marked advantage tor their products, and has 
aided in giving large consumers here a pro- 
nounced benefit. The dun expires on the 15th 
of next month. It will be a marked detriment 
to our manufacturers and large consumers of 
fuel if the duty on coal docs not remain elimi- 
nated. If it resolves itself into a case where the 
greater good to the greater number is considered, 
the duty on coal will never again be considered. 
The present position is a complicated one. The 
outlook for low-priced Australian coal is dis- 
couraging, partially because the inducements for 
carriers to come here are anything but profitable, 
and partially because outward freights on grain 
from here are exceedingly low, and grain freights 
from Australia are fully 50 per cent higher than 
from here. The quantity of coal of all grades 
on hand here at present is small. There are un- 
certain factors now existing which may create a 
very generous demand for fuel in the near fu- 
ture, principally the requirements of our Gov- 
ernment for Panama and adjacent ports, hence 
the market is in a very uncertain condition. If 
the present outward rates of freight on grain 
from here should show no improvement in the 
near future, which will minimise Colonial im- 
ports, thus leaving the control of the local coal 
market in very few hands, which will assure 
high figures for 1904. The marked difference 
between the prices of domestic grades and ordi- 
nary steam coals is likely to be sustained, as the 
output of the former is concentrated in very few 
hands. 

The various suorces from which we have de- 
rived our coal supplies fcr the past year are as 
follows : 

Tons. 

British Columbia 289,890 

Australia 276,186 

English and Welsh 61,580 

Scotch 3,495 

Eastern (Cumberland and Anthra- 
cite) 13,262 





•it I liablo, Coos Baj .m, I 1 

.1 Mountains by rail . 



I03, JIO 



1,315,554 

1 si ttemenl of the entire 

consumption of California I have been 
obliged to include deliveries at Port l.os Angeles 
and S;.n Diega b) water, which have been added 
in the above sources of supply. The total 
.-.mount received bj water at those ports toot up 
09,348 tons. 

It can be safe!) computed that the California 
I inducts of fuel oil for IOO3 will foot up be- 
tween twenty and twenty-one millions of bar- 
rels as against thirteen million for 1002. De- 
ducting the quantity which will be refined and 
the amount which will be exported, there will 
yel remain enough lor steam uses to be a dis- 
turbing factor in the consumption of coal. Dur- 
ing the year there has been a marked advance 
ot a further improvement in price of oil. The 
railroad companies have absorbed most of the 
most promising properties, the output of which 
will not seek buyers, hence the market price will 
not be affected. 

It is anticipated that the product of oil the 
coming year will largely exceed the figures for 
1903. This may prove true, but there is evi- 
dence already before us that the output of a large 
number of our older wells is shrinking materially 
and in some cases very markedly. 

Coke. — The total deliveries here by water 
foot up 68,090 tons, as against 64,916 tons last 
year. Fully 75 per cent of this amount was 
shipped from England and Germany, the bal- 
ance principally from Belgium and Australia. 
J. W. Harrison. 



A Report From Alaska. 

A prominent oil man who has just returned 
from Alaska after spending several months there 
in sizing up the situation of those northern oil 
fields and what has been accomplished there from 
the knowledge obtained by practical investiga- 
tion. The facts in connection with these fields 
are of greatest importance to oil men the world 
over. 

The principal fields are known as the Martin 
River, Chilkat-Katulla, Nitchawak and Ya- 
katage. The territory' comprised is a district of 
over seventy miles in length. It. has all been 
located except a little in Yakatage and Nitcha- 
wak. 

In the Chilikat field a well has been sunk to 
360 feet, and there they got oil that flowed over 
the top of the derrick. They capped it and left 
it for some time. The formation is one of soft 
shale. The oil is forty-three to forty-five gravity 
and shows a large percentage of illuminating oil. 
There was only two feet of sand found here. 
There were no traces of asphaltum. One thou- 
sand feet from this a 280-foot well was sunk, 
which produce from 300 to 400 barrels. A third 



well has been sunk further back, where shale 
and sandstone arc thicker, to a depth of 700 or 
Bt They claim to be able to gel six) bar- 
lels a day out ot this. The gravity was forty- 
six and the base a good paralhne. The sedi- 
ments all show paraffine. This is about the only 
developing done in this field, t )utside some wells 
were sunk, one to a depth ot 1,700 feet, hut no 
oil was found. There are huge adjoining prop- 
el tics, mostly of no value. 

All the goqd lands have been located. An 
English and Canadian syndicate is doing consid- 
erable work there, they having a lease of twenty 
vears with option of purchase. The\ have al- 
ready spent some 80,000 pounds on the work 
and expect to develop a good field. 

Cold Bay is another important field. The 
formation here is of sandstone. There are two 
wells started. Here again the base is paraffine. 
Both are under 400 feet, so nothing conclusive 
can yet be determined. The great trouble up to 
the present in developing is that insufficient ma- 
chinery has been taken in ; where to prevent de- 
lays machinery in duplicate should have been fur- 
nished it has not been done. Then much money- 
has been squandered by enterprises not having 
competent, practical men at their heads. 



Effects of Fuel OH. 



The chief factor in mining to stimulate manu- 
facturing and to help in the further development 
of the State's mineral wealth has been the dis- 
covery that we possess vast oil fields — productive 
oil measures which cover, in fact, a greater area 
than that possessed by any State in the Union 
or by any known oil-bearing region elsewhere in 
the world. This is practically the development 
of the past seven years, for prior to 1898 the 
total production of petroleum was under 2,- 
000,000 barrels a year. In fact, excepting in 
1897, the total output previously approximated 
only 1,000,000 barrels, and this was all ob- 
tained from a few widely separated and small 
areas in the southern counties. Since then the 
productive field has been steadily expanding un- 
til the known oil-bearing measures underlie hun- 
dreds of square miles of territory. Very small 
sections of this have been exploited, but the out- 
put of that which has been prospected has in- 
creased by leaps and bounds from 2,249,088 
barrels in 1898 to 14,356,910 barrels in 1902 and 
approximately 23,000,000 barrels in 1903. The 
increase during the last three years has ranged 
from 7,000,000 to 9,000,000 barrels a year. If 
the same ratio of increase is continued during 
the next ten years we shall be producing in 191 3 
from 73,000,000 to 113,000,000 barrels of crude 
oil. If it is sustained for twenty years California 
oil wells will be yielding from 163,000,000 to 
203,000,000 barrels annually. The area of oil- 
bearing territory is large enough, and so far as 
present evidence indicate, rich enough to yield 
this enormous output indefinitely w-hen fully ex- 
ploited. At 50 cents a barrel this will be worth 
from $81,500,000 to $101,500,000. — Chronicle. 



The 

Name 

Determines 

the 

Quality 



F I T L E R'S 1 Oil Well Supply Co/s 



DRILLING 

CABLES 



m 



Drilling Tools 
Engines & Supplies 
Pumping Outfits 



R. H. HERRON CO. 

509 Mission St. - SAN FRANCISCO 



The 

Name 

Determines 

the 

Quality 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Coalinga Letter. 



Coalinga, Cal., Jan. 7, 1904. 
The Hanford Oil Company has just finished 
another well, which is conservatively estimated to 
produce 250 barrels per day of a high gravity 
oil. With this new well the company is stead- 
ily pumping five wells, delivering its entire pro- 
duction to the Pacific Coast Oil Company. 
Drilling on No. 6 commenced on the 30th ult. 

The 200,000-barrel reservoir for the Southern 
Pacific Railroad will be let out on contract. Bids 
were closed on the 1st of the month, but up to 
the present time no knowledge of a contract be- 
ing awarded to anj'one has been reported. It will 
take a considerable time before the railroad will 
be in condition to take oil, as it is planning to 
erect a complete pumping plant, including the 
drilling of a water well on section 7. The rail- 
road company has tankage capacity of 120,000 
barrels in the field and at Ora. 

The Caribou has finished deepening its second 
well, which is now. producing at the rate of 400 
barrels per day. The two wells, which have 
been deepened have increased the production of 
the company to nearly 700 barrels per day of a 
23 gravity oil. Spudding on No. 4 will begin 
this week. And it is the intention of the Cari- 
bou Oil Company to deepen its No. 1 when fin- 
ished with No. 4. The well of the Sour Dough 
Oil Company, which is under the same manage- 
ment with the Caribou, has been idle for some 
time awaiting its turn to be deepened and put 
to producing. 

Mr. John Bunting has recently purchased sec- 
tion 24, 21-15, lying southeast of town. Rumor 
will have it that the Associated Oil Company 
has purchased and is negotiating for certain 
tracts of land in that immediate vicinity. Con- 
siderable activity in land deals is displayed in 
that section of the field, comprising several sec- 
tions, including sections 16 and 10. 

The Pleasant Valley Farming Company is de- 
livering its production from well No. I, to the 
Pacific Coast Oil Company. In well No. 2 it is 
penetrating the pay sand, and in all probability 
will have it finished by the end of next week. 
No. 3 is being rigged up for drilling. 

The three iron tanks for the Esperanza have 
been finished and are now being connected up 
for use: The two 3,000-barrel tanks will be 
used for gauge tanks, while the 30,000-barrel 
tank will be devoted for storage. No. 4 of this 
company is down 850 feet. The lumber for a 
new rig is on the lease, and in addition several 
houses are being erected, including one for the 
field manager, Mr. Anderson. 

The Maine State has supplanted its gas power 
plant with steam in running the Jacks for its 
four pumping wells. 

The Union Oil Company has one of the most 
peculiar wells in this field. The well is pumping 
as any normal well, but in addition to it there 
is a large stream of oil flowing between the six 
and eight-inch casing. Between the pumping and 
flowing well — all in one — it produces 600 bar- 
rels per day. The production from this well is 
almost three times what it was when first 
brought in. No. 2 of the same company was 
finished last week and started in at the rate of 
100 barrels. However, indications point to- 
wards a large production after the well rids it- 
self of some of the sand, as was the case with 
No. I. Rig No. 4 is nearly finished. 

The Wabash reports 600 feet. At 500 feet 
they struck tremendous stream of water, which 
completely drained the flow of water that was 
coming up between the casings, and was utilized 
for drilling purposes in well No. 1. 

Several men have been at work during the past 



two weeks building bridges over the irrigating 
ditches, preparatory for the new county road 
connecting the west side with town. This road 
will be oiled before it is opened to the public, as 
will also the county road on the east side leading 
from town to section 28. With these two roads 
in good condition the entire oil field will be 
benefited, as nearly every producer can and will 
use them. 

Election of officers of the Shawmutt Oil Com- 
pany, mentioned in our last issue, was held this 
week and the following officers elected for the 
ensuing year : John A. Bunting, president ; W. L. 
B. Mills, vice-president; J. F. Davies, secretary; 
G. A. Scott, assistant secretary. 

The company will commence active operations 
at once, lumber and casing for the first well hav- 
ing already been shipped to the property. 

The San Joaquin Oil Company have declared 
a dividend of $2.20 on its capital stock, amount- 
ing to $220,000. This dividend, we understand, 
was from the sale of stock. R. M. D. 



Supreme Court Decision 
Many Titles. 



Affects 



The Supreme Court has rendered a decision 
which holds in effect that in locating a section 
of oil lands the lines of the Government survey 
are to be followed, even though the amount 
thus enclosed may exceed 160 acres, and may also 
be left outside the claim stakes set up by the 
locators. The decision was given in the case 
of Mrs. J. M. Crawford vs. the Kern Oil Com- 
pany in favor of the company and overrules the 
Superior Court of this county. The land in- 
volved is three acres in the heart of Kern River 
district, all of which was outside the location 
stakes set up by the company's locators and part 
of which is in excess of the 160 acres in the sec- 
tion. An application for a rehearing is to be 
filed. Many claims are effected by the decision. 



Does Salt Water Preserve Animal 
Fat? 



When making salt from natural salt springs, 
by boiling, a little blood is added and the brine 
brought as rapidly as possible to the boiling 
point, when a scum forms containing a consid- 
erable amount of organic matter and bitumen. 
This is common to all natural salt springs, but 
not found in the salt water from the sea. 



Pacific On, Reporter $2.50 per year. 



Pacific Oil Reporter is $2.50 per year. 



Fuel Oil and Electricity. 

Within the past few 5'ears conditions have 
changed. The watersheds of our elevated ranges 
have turned out, through the progress made in 
electrical discovery, to be inexhaustive sources 
of transmissible power, and the waste lands of a 
large area of the State have proved to contain the 
cheapest form of fuel, requiring the least hu- 
man effort and the smallest outlay of capital to 
make available for all purposes needful to convert 
its mineral wealth into the commercial commodi- 
ties demanded by the world. The available horse- 
power energy of the drainage of the watersheds 
is counted by experts in millions. It is as- 
sumed that 1,000,000 horse-power is available to 
San Francisco within a radius of 200 miles. 
Hundreds of square miles of oil-bearing lands, 
whose productive capacity can not now be fairly 
estimated, have been sufficiently explored to dem- 
onstrate their reliability as a source of fuel sup- 
ply for possibly centuries to come. 

We have thus been placed by fortuitous cir- 
cumstances in a position whereby the whole fu- 
ture of mining development and its subsidiary in- 
dustries has been completely changed. The in- 
dustrial possibilities growing out of the new con- 
dition of the State's mineral development em- 
brace the widest range, and include not only the 
industries directly associated with the production 
of minerals, but, likewise, an indefinite number 
of others indirectly and remotely dependent upon 
the mining industry. The industrial and com- 
mercial development of the British isles, for ex- 
ample, is traceable to its mineral wealth, which 
is the foundation of all of its achievements in 
the industrial arts and sciences and its upbuilding 
as a world power. Without coal, iron, copper, 
lead, zinc and tin, particularly the first-named 
two, Great Britain would never have developed 
as it has done, for its pastoral resources and its 
fisheries are limited and give employment to only 
a small and insignificant number of manufactur- 
ing industries. — Chronicle. 

We manufactuie the best 
lubricating; oils for oil 
drillers 

KING KEYSTONE OIL CO., 
116 Front St., San Francisco. 

Wanted. 



Some nji-inch casing. Must be in good 
condition and cheap for cash. 

J. E. KERR, 
Rialto Bldg., San Francisco} 




TANKS 



/ CAPACITY. 



V^ARREN 



IN CITY BOILER WOH 
WARREN, OHIO. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Advertising Would Prevent Fraud. 



will not permit 

by the most formal business card in new 

rmittcd I 
pl"> iiur tci send out «dv< 

literature or personal letters thai will be in am 

Tlir Consolidated 
cban| lias a rule hardly les 

preli 

The illative ad- 

■ open for a preponderance 
of take, fraud and get-rich-while-you-wail ad- 
vertisers' who depend on the ignorance oi the 
ral public of legitimate speculative invest- 
ments. The \ast sum-, lit money that havi 
into the coffers of these unscrupulous advertisers 
shows that the field of speculation is hardly 
touched bj the legitimate stock exchanges. An 
advertising authority estimates that $100,000,000 
yearly is contributed to the questionable pro- 
moter — most of it through the pulling powers 
of printers' ink. How much better if the great 
exchanges would enter the field of publicity and 
compete with the frauds for a share of the invest- 
ors' money. 

The same idea can be applied to mining ad- 
vertising. The concern that has the most money 
to spend in advertising is not always the best. 
The advertisements that tell only generalities and 
that promise enormous dividends on the spot are 
intended for the gullible. The public is getting 
educated as to mining propositions, partly from 
experience and partly from systematic and edu- 
cative work of a few mining papers, and some of 
the honest and intelligent promoters of mining 
companies. 

The great stock exchanges can aid this work 
by removing the ban on legitimate speculative ad- 
vertising and aiding in educating the public as to J 
what an honest speculation is. — Western Mining I 
World. 



Things Worth Knowing. 



rill ignite from the lun's 
I 
with lard or other animal oil. Lampblack 
and 1 little oil 01 wattt will under certain condi- 
tions ignite spontaneously. i and char- 

nhustion. New print- 
nk mi paper, when in contact with a steam 

pipe will ignite quickly. Boiled linseed oil ami 

turpentine in equal parts mi cotton waste will 
in a tew h.mrs under a mild heat, and will 

in time create enough heat to ignite spontaneous- 
ly. Bituminous coal should not be stored where 

11 will come in contact with w 1 pa it it i. 

columns or against warm boiler settings or -team 
pipe-. This coal should nut be \er\ deep if it is 
to he kept in storage for a long period. It piled 
in the basement of a building it should be shallow 
and free from moistuie and under good ventila- 
tion. That liable to absorb moisture should be 

but tied first. 1 1 on fire, a small quantity of v atej 

showered on this kind of coal cokes and re- 
tards it. 

Iron chips, tilings or turnings should not be 
stored in a shop in wooden boxes. The oily 
waste which is not infrequently thrown among 
them adds to the danger of fire from this source. 
The sweepings from the machine shop, if kept on 
hand, should never be placed over iron shavings. 
This mass of disinfected iron is enough to incite 
heat and combustion. Iron and steel filings and 
turnings when mixed with oil will ignite spon- 
taneously after becoming damp. A steam pipe 
against wood will cause the latter to ignite spon- 
taneously after being carbonized, particularly if 
superheated steam enters the pipe, thus increasing 
the temperature. — Dyer's Bulletin. 



The subscription price of the Pacific Oil 
Reorter is $2 50 per year. 



" Penn-Coalinga Petroleum Co. 
Stock for Sale. 



Has two good wells now. and adjoins "Sec- 
tion Seven," wbicb has a well flowing 1,000 
barrels a day. 

J. S. EWEN, 
318 Pine St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Remember that our subscription rate is 
only $2 50 per year, for which we give the 
latest news from all the fields. 



C OA L 



90 

**_ In g a 

Is the most promising oil field in Cali- 
fornia. While other fields are quiet, 
this one is more active than ever. High 
grade oil, big wells, splendid transpor- 
tation facilities and low prices for land 
account for this. There are splendid op- 
portunities here for investment. 

I have one 200-acre tract, near devel- 
opments, directly in line, with outcrop- 
pings of oil sand, for $75 an acre. Fee 
title. Nothing like it to be had for the 
price anywhere. I also have several de- 
veloped properties for sale on easy 
terms. 

Write for particulars. 

U. M. THOMAS, 

318 Pine Street 
San Francisco. 



TO CALIFORNIA 



Is delightful 
Most ways 

Always 

But the way 

Always 

Most delightful 

Is the way 



BY NEW ORLEANS 



Scenic 

The Coast Line 

Quaint Mexican Life 

Sugar and Cotton Plantations 

Sunshine and Balmy Air All The Way 

Louisiana, Texas, Mexico, New Mexico, Arizona. 

Personally Conducted Pullman Tourist Sleepers 

Vestibuled Standard Pullman Sleepers 

Faultless Dining Car Service 

Reclining Chair Cars 

Compartment Car 

Comfort 



SUNSET ROUTE 



SUNSET EXPRESS 



New Orleans to San Francisco Every Day 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



The Fountain 



The American Duchess 

The Wisconsin Gold Bond 



IN — 



Half Moon Bay 



The only field in California producing 52° gravity oil ; parafnne base. 

The recent bringing in of the Independent gusher is considered the most important strike in California in recent years. 

The following companies have extensively developed holdings immediately adjoining the strike : 

The Fountain Oil Company upon whose lease the strike was made. No treasury stock in this company has been offered for 

sale in the last two years. We have made arrangements by which we can offer a very small amount of this stock for sale, for a 
limited time, at $1.00 per share. 

The Wisconsin Gold Bond Oil Company has a well down nearly 1600 feet, which has produced thousands of dollars worth of 
oil and is still going deeper. This stock is now selling at 50 cents and will undoubtedly be at a much higher figure in the near 
future. For blocks of this stock at this price, write or wire us immediately. 

The American Duchess Oil Company not only holds a large acreage in the best productive portion of this field, but controls an 
interest in other very valuable properties. For shares or information address us. Stock now selling at 50 cents. 

A new company, now organizing, has secured extensive properties in this field, including a well now drilling within 400 feet of 
the gusher. All of these stocks purchased through us are protected by our Trust Fund Agreement. For information address, 



DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY, 



Rialto Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



Private Booms 



Phone Main 5966 



Jules Wittmann 



Jules' Restaurant 



Regular Dinner with wine, 75c. 
Sundays and Holidays, $1.00. 



315 317 319=32(323 

Pine St,. S. F. 



Open Evenings 
Music Sundays 



TwTB.-SH.2a.EniT. 'RttpQnnn 




FOR SALE 



IN 

KERN RIVER, Cheap 

Section 2, 29-28. 

Shaded portion map shows 40 a;res three-fourths mile east of 
DISCOVERY WELL. U. S. Patent 22 years. EASY TERMS. 
Cheapest in Kern River. Write at once. 

WESTERN R. 1, CO., 

Room 36 Chronicle Bldg., 

San Francisco. 



ALL 



the oil news 
is our motto 



We have active correspondents in 
each field who send us all the 
news of interest. 



PROMOTERS 



Do you desire to sell stock in your gold, copper, 
mining, oil and other industrial companies ? If so, 
you cannot find a better advertising medium than 

The Dixie Manufacturer 

Birmingham, Alabama. 

It is the leading industrial and finadcinl paper published in the South. 
It reaches that class of readers who are Interested in Financial and 
Industrial A»iairs. Its readeas are those who have money for invest- 
ment and answer advertisements. Some of the larges' companies in the 
United States have advertised in its columns and found it profitable. 
Why not you ? 

The Dixie Manufacturer is published s^mi-monthly. It is old and 
established. GUARANTEED CIRCULATION 10,000. Subscrip- 
tion price $2.00 per year Advertising rates 10 cents per agate line, 14 
lines to the inch, per issue. Try an ad. Send for Sample copy. Address 

Rountree Publishing Co. 

Birmingham, Alabama* 



« • • vll Y « • • 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stable 



H. C. KBRR, Proprietor 



FIRST=CLASS TURNOUTS 



New Rigs of All Kinds 
At Regular Union Rates 



Coalinga 



California 



PACIPIC OIL RBfORTHR 



THE NATIONAL SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

Oil Well Supplies 
Drilling and 
Fishing Tools 

Fitler Cables-best in the world 

We carry in stock heavy 7^-in., 5^i-ln. and 
4^-ln. Boston Casing, in addition to all the 
standard sizes and weights. 6-in., 8-ln. and 
10-ln. Boston Drive Pipe always on hand. 

Pacific Coast Headquarters 

117 North Main Street 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Branches: 

Bakersfield, Coalinga and McKlttrlck 



The New 
"Up=to=Date" 



MAPS 



issued by the 
well known 
map makers 



BARLOW & HILL 



will be for sale by the 



Pacific Oil Reporter 

318 Pine St., San Francisco. 



Place your orders early 



California 

Limited 



«^*^ 
<&<& 



The comfort-lovers' train 
Built to fit the desires 
of travelers 
Runs to Chicago 



The Scenic Way East 

Through Picturesque 
Indian country, magnificent 
natural scenery and over 
an unsurpassed roadbed 



Santa Fe 



A BUSINESS PROPOSITION 



We all seek the most comforts In 
this life at the minimum expenditure 
of labor or cash. If you are going 
East you will find the 

UNION PACIFIC 

ahead of all others on the above 
basis. At the same time you reach 
your destination quicker. 
Drop me a postal and I will call and 
explain everything. 



S. F. BOOTH, 

General Agent U. P. R. R. Co. 
No. 1 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 



<4 

California Stock and Oil 
Exchange. 

The following were the stock sales in 
the California Stock and Oil Exchange 
in the formal sessions held for the week 
ending Wednesday, December 30th. 

ASSOCIATED OIL CO. BONDS, 

2,000 at 76.00 $152,000 

CLAIRMONT. 

500 at 40 2C0 00 

HOME OIL. 

100 at 1 10 no 00 

MONARCH. 

• 300 at 40 12000 

PETROLEUM CENTER. 

500 at 05 2500 

PEERLESS 

10 at 13 75 137 50 

REED CRUDE 

51 at 450 22500 

339 at 460 1.559 40 

STERLING. 

100 at 275 27500 

SOVEREIGN. 

. 505 at 37 185 co 

SUPERIOR. 
500 at 05 25 00 

TOLTEC 

200 at 19 38 00 

1,500 at 20 3 jo 00 

TWENTY-EIGHT. 
120 at 500 60000 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



6,720 Shares 



Amount, |i55,799-9° 



'9 

.82 J 



The monthly record of sales since 
January I, 1903, is as follows: 

Shares. Value. _ 

January 267,019 $255, 202 

February 3«,443 219,358 

March 199,908 151,982 

April 236,268 115,571 

May 401.454 154.386 

June 154,720 117,928 

July 74,594 71,89° 

August 181,478 119,231 

September 146, 123 74,455 

October 73,46o 30,322 

November 69,067 24,703 

Stock Quotations. 

Following are the latest quotations for 
stocks of oil companies listed on the Cal- 
ifornia Stock and Oil Exchange : 

Oil Stocks, Bid. Asked. 

Alma 

Apollo 

Assb. Oil Co Stk. Tr. 

Certificates 18 

Aztec 

Bay City 15 . 

Bear Flag 

California Standard .. .10 

Caribou 1 40 

Central Point Con 

Chicago Crude 

Clairemont 37 

Esperanza 

Fauna 

Four 69 . 

Fulton 

Giant 

Hanford 140 00 

Homestake .. 

Home I.07K 

Imperial 

Independence n 

Junction 

Kern 

Kern River 12.00 

Lion 01 

Maricopa 

McKittrick 

Monarch, of Arizona. . .40 

Monte Cristo 66 

Nevada .35 

Occidental of West Va 

Oil City Petroleum 25 

Peerless 1375 

Piedmont „ 

Petroleum Center ..... 05 

Pittsburg 

Reed Crude, New Issue. 4.50 

S. F. & McKittrick 

San Joaquin O. & D 

Section Seven 

Senator 62 

Shamrock 

Sovereign 37 

Sterling 2.50 

Sunset(Or ) 

Superior 05 

Teck 

Thirty-three 6.75 

Toltec 

Twenty- eight 4. 50 

Union 

United Petroleum 

West Shore 

Western Petroleum 

Wolverine 



.11 
2.00 



1. So 
.10 

4 20 

•25 

143-00 

1.12% 



• 4 

18 

47, 

14 00 

02 



20 



17 



10 



4.60 
3-oo 



•39 
2-75 



•07 

7-50 

.20 

5.87 * 



Notice of Annual Meeting of 
Stockholders of the Colusa 
Standard Oil & Refining Co. 

Notice is hereby given that the an- 
nual meeting of the stockholders of the 
Colusa Consolidated Oil & Refining Co. 
for the election of a Board of Directors 
to serve for the ensuing year, will be 
held at tbe company's office, Room 42 
Crocker Building, in the City of San 
Francisco, State of California, on Tues- 
day the 26th day of January, 1904, at 
2:00 o'clock, p. M. 

O. ROSS, 
R. W. SNOW, Secretary. 

President. 
San Francisco, Cal., January 9, 1904. 

Delinquent Notice. 

HIGH GRAVITY OIL COMPANY. 
— Location of principal place of business, 
San Francisco. Location of works, Ho] je 
Raicb, San Mateo County, Ca). 

NOTICE. — There are delinquent upon 
the following described stock on account 
of Assessment No. 2 levied on the 18th 
day of November 1903, the several 
amounts set opposite the names of the 
respective shareholders, as follows : 
No. No. 

NAME Certificate Shares Arut 

L R. Frick 2g 200 $20 

L. R. Frick 29 300 30 

F. W. Otten 4, 100 10 

Tillie Otten 46 100 10 

Edward Lloyd 48 100 10 

Lulu Hayer 49 50 5 

FHnnie Marshall .. .55 100 10 

MaudAlborn 57 50 5 

W. C. Alborn 5,9 50 5 

Fannie Marshall .61 100 10 

And in accordance with law and an or- 
der of the Board of Directors on the 
18th day of November, 19 3 so many 
shares of each parcel of such stock rs 
may be necessary will be sold at public 
auction at the office of the company, 
423 Market St., San Francisco, Califor- 
nia, on the 13th day of January, 1904, at 
the hour of 10 o'clock A. M., of said day, 
to pay delinquent assessments thereon, 
together with cost of advertising and 
expenses of the sale. 

D. ROSENBLUM, 

Secretary. 

Office, 423 Market Street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 



WANTED 



A man who will advance cash 
to put down one deep oil well on 
fifty acres of proven land, with 
two wells now pumping 30 grav- 
ity oil. Tools, engines boilers and 
casing on the property free from 
debts ; land patented. Will give 
a large interest in the property 
for the money advanced. 

Apply to 

A. D. EL WELL, 

605 Grant Bldg. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



AMERICAN CONSOLIDATED 
Oil Company 

A. 15. Butler, J. A. Chanslor, 

President Vice President 



13,750 shares of stock for sale at 
8 cents per share — par value $1.00 



3 00 



P. W. SPAULDING 

ATTORN tY-AT-LAW 

Evanston - Wyoming 

613 Market St., San Francisco. 



Stock, Bond and Investment Syndicate 

(Incorporated) 
Money Loaned on Stocks. 

Listed and Unlisted Oil and Mining Stocks 
R. I,. CHKNEY, Secretary 
514-515 Examiner Building 

San Francisco, California 



4 * 

Santa Fe 

% r 



ALL TBE WAY 

CHICAGO 
In 3 Days 



Trains leave Union Ferry Depot, San Fran- 
clsco, as follows: 

7aa A. M— *BAKERSFIELD LOCAL; Due 
* ill Stockton 10:40 a. m., Fresno 3:40 P- m., 
• uv Bakersfield 7:15 p. m. Stops at all points 
in San Joaquin Valley. Corresponding 
train arrives 8:55 a. m. 

9*a A. M.-g"THE CALIFORNIA LIMIT- 
•Sll ED;" Due Stockton 12:01 p. m., Fresno 
• wv 3:20 p. m., Bakersfield 6:00 p. m., Kansas 
City 3rd day 2:35 a. m., Chicago 3rd day 
2:15 p. m. Palace Sleepers and Dining 
Car through to Chicago. No second class 
tickets honored on this train. Corres- 
ponding train arrives °ii:io p. m. 
9aa A. M.-*VALLEY LIMITED; Due 
*"ill Stockton 12:01 p. m., Fresno 3:20 p. m 
• uv Bakersfield 6:00 p. m. The fastest train 
in the Valley, Carries Composite and 
Reclining Chair Car. No second class 
tickets honored on this train. Corres- 
ponding train arrives 11:10 p. m. 
4aa P. M.— * STOCKTON LOCAL; Due 
*l|l| Stockton 7:10 p. m. Corresponding train 
• vv arrives 11:10 a.m. 

8 a A P. M.— *OVERLAND EXPRESS ; Due 
Mill Stockton 11:15 P- »■> Fresno 3:15 a. m. 
• vw Bakersfield 7:35 a. m , Kansas City 4th 
day 7:00 a. m., Chicago 4th day 8:47 p. m 
Palace and Tourist Sleepers and free Re- 
clining Chair Cars through to Chicago. 
Also Palace Sleeper which cuts out at 
Fresno. Corresponding train arrives 
4:25 p. m. 
* Daily g Mondays and Thursdays 

Tuesdays and Fridays. 
Personally Conducted Parties for Kansas 
City, Chicago and East leave on Overland Express 
Monday, Thursday and Saturday at 8:00 p. m. 
Ticket Offices, 641 Market Street and in Ferry 
Depot, San Francisco ; and 1112 Broadway 
Oakland. . 



UNION 
PACIFIC 

Suggests 

Speed 
and 
Comfort 

S. F. Booth, Gen. Agent. 
1 Montgomery St., 8. F. 

Phone, Exchange 300. 



W. A. BROPHY, 

914 Mutual Savings Bank Bldg., 

70S Market St., San Francisco. 
Telephone, Green 816. 

Petroleum Lands Examined and Re- 
ported on in all Parts of the United 
States. California a Specialty. 



J. 8. EWEN 

STOCKBROKER 

318 PINE STREET, Room 5 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Member California Stock and Oil Ex- 
change, and San Francisco and Tonopah 
Mining Fxchange. 

Telephone Main 1552. 



Companies Incorporated 

under the lienient laws of 

ARIZONA 

which has the broadest laws of any state. 
Companies can be organized to do busiuess any 
where No personal liability. No limit on capi 
talization. No State examination of books. No 
franchise tax. Stock can be made non-assessable 
and can be issued for services. 

Write for Information and blanks to 
HUGH M. CRE1GHTON & CO. 
Phoenix, Arizona. 



Wyoming Oil Companies 

We can furnish you nice folders 
with the map of Uinta county ol 
fields on one side, and on the 
other whatever advertising matter 
you may desire. 

We have half-tone cuts of the 
field which can be used in the 
folder free of charge. On the 
map your property will be shown 
in colors. 

Price per thousand $40. When 
a large number are desired a sub- 
stantial reduction per thousand 
is made. 

Orders filled promptly, 
Pacific Oii, Reporter, 
318 Pine street, 
San Francisco. Cal. 



"LIGHTNING WELL MACHT- 

IS THE STANDARD, 
STfAM PUMPS, AIR LIFTS, ir I , I 
GASOLINE ENGINES' £,f>it 

WRITE TOR CIRCULAR fEM SSsMCSr' 

ITHE AMERICAN WELL WORKS K : Jir^% 

AURORA, ILL -CHICAGO.- DALLAS.TEX 



Oil Companies 

WE 
DO 
JOB 
PRINTING 

Pacific Oil Reporter 

318 Pine Street 



Bound Volumes 

of the 

Pacific 

Oil 

Reporter 



MAY BB HAD AS FOLLOWS: 

Prom Not. i, 1899, t0 Not. x, 1900 $6.00 

From Not. 1 , 1900, to Not. I, 1901 6.00 

Prom Not. x, 1901, to Not. i, 1902 5.00 



These volumes are strongly and 
artistically bound, and contain 
the only full and correct informa- 
tion as to the development of the 
oil industry on the Pacific coast. 



Editorial and Publishing Office 

318 Pine Street 
San Francisco, - Cal. 






PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 5. No. n. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., SATURDAY, JANUARY 16 IQ04 



Price, Tbn Cunts. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

PuUl.h.d Wnklr 
The on Authority of the Pacific Coast 

By California Pitroltia Mlaara' Aaaoclatlon 



MRS. MARIA ROSA WINN, Proprietor. 

R. S. EASTMAN, 

Editor and Business Manager 

OraiCB AMD RDITOBIAL ROOkCI 

318 Pine Street. San Francisco, California 

Telephone. Bush 176. 

TERMS 

On Tbab S»5° 

til Moirma 150 

Tnn Moimra ■ oo 

St nou Conn. IOC 

STKICTLT IN ADVANCE 

Moitb-t abould be aent by Postal Order, Draft jr Regiatered 
Letter, addreeeed to Pacific Oil Reporter, 31I Pine street. San 
Francisco, rooms U-JV33. Coram unlcaUoni must be accomDanled 
by wrlter'a name and address, not necessarily for publication. 
bat as a (ruaraotee of food faith. 

Entered in the Postoffke at San Francisco, California, is sec- 
ond class matter. 

PROMOTION CO MMITTEB ISSUES 
ATTRACTIVE PUPLICATION. 

The second number of For California, the 
monthly publication of the California Promotion 
Committee, has just reached this office. An in- 
teresting feature of this number is an original 
serial entitled "The Brown Family in Cali- 
fornia," in which is related how a New England 
family, the husband, wife and four children, came 
to California. The first chapter of the story, 
besides containing valuable information as to cost 
of the journey to California, is full of human 
interest and a bit of romance runs through the 
tale. Each succeeding number of For California 
will tell what the Brown family accomplished 
during the month preceding the issuance of that 
number. The serial will be possessed of facts and 
full of interest and lively suggestions. Other 
valuable features in the January number of For 
California are "What California has done for 
Civilization," by Dr. David Star Jordan, presi- 
dent of the Leland Stanford, Jr., University; 
"The Most Desirable City in Which to Live," 
by former Mayor James D. Phelan of San Fran- 
cisco; "California Deciduous Fruit Shipping," 
by Hon. Alden Anderson, Lieutenant-Governor 
of California, and manager of the California 
Fruit Distributors. For California contains no 
advertising, being supported entirely by sub- 
scription. The publication is not copyrighted, con- 
sequently any one is at liberty to take excerpts. 
It is hoped that the committee will receive credit 
for all such excerpts, for the magazine is cer- 
tainly to be commended. 



Oil Exchange Directors Meet. 

The board of directors of the Bakersfield Oil 
and Stock Exchange held a special meeting last 
week, at which Captain John F. Lucy was elected 
a director to succeed Clarence J. Berry, resigned. 
A full new board will be elected at the annual 
meeting of the stockholders, which will be held 
about the first of May. The meeting last week 
was called by President John A. Bunting to 
consider some matters connected with the litiga- 
tion in which the exchange is now involved, but 
no action was taken so far as was given out. 



Pacific Oil Reporter $2.50 per year. 



New Geologic Folios. 

The United States Geological Survey has 
three new geologic folios read] for distribution. 
They arc the Tishomingo (Indian Territory) 
folio, No. 98; the Mitchell (South Dakota) 
folio, No. 'in ami the Alexandria folio, also 
of South Dakota, No. 100. 

The Tishomingo quadrangle lies in the south- 
eastern part of the Chickasaw nation, I. T., the 
eastern edge being nearly three miles west of the 
Choctaw-Chickasaw boundary line, and the 
southern side about three miles north of the 
nearest approach of Red River. The mineral 
resources of the quadrangle are asphalt, granite, 
limestone and clay. Asphalt is the only product 
that has been developed to any considerable ex- 
tent. The bituminous deposits occur chiefly as 
interstitial impregnations in the sandstones, lime- 
stones, conglomerates, and grits of three distinct 
geological formations. Some of the soils of the 
quadrangle are exceedingly fertile. Mr. Joseph 
A. Taff is the author of the folio. 

The Mitchell and Alexander quadrangles, in 
South Dakota, adjoin the Olivet and Parker 
quadrangles, which were also recently surveyed. 
Mr. J. E. Todd is the author of the Mitchell 
folio and joint author with Mr. C. M. Hall of 
the Alexandria folio. The most important fea- 
ture in these four folios is the discussion of the 
water resources of this region, and the most val- 
uable result of the geological investigations is the 
information obtained regarding distribution, var- 
iety, and accessibility of the water. 

The Mitchell quadrangle includes portions of 
Davison, Aurora, Sanborn, and Jerauld coun- 
ties, and lies almost entirely in the James River 
Valley. The quadrangle contains no deposits of 
mineral ores or coal. Fragments of coal are 
sometimes found in the drift, but these were, 
brought by the ice or by streams from the lignite 
beds in the northern part of the James River 
Valley in North Dakota. 

The Alexandria quadrangle also lies in the 
James River Valley, the greater portion of it be- 
ing included in Hanson county and the remain- 
der in Miner, Sanborn, McCook and Davison 
counties. No deposits of mineral ores or coals 
are found here, but a red quartzite commonly 
known as "Sioux Falls granite" or "jasper" is 
abundant and makes a beautiful and practically 
indestructible building stone. 

The prices of these folios is twenty-five cents 
each. 



Glycerene Men Arrested. 

Reports from the Kansas oil field indicate that 
Christmas day was one of the most lively that 
has been celebrated in that neck of the woods 
for many a year and the excitement, which began 
early in the morning lasted until late at night. 
There were several new wells ready for the shot 
on the morning of Christmas day, and producers 
who would many times rather have been observ- 
ing the memorable feast were compelled to get 
out in the field and take care of their produc- 
tion. But when it came time for the shooters to 
appear, there was a noticeable hitch in arrange- 
ments, and a little investigation revealed a series 
of exciting adventures through which the 
handlers of deadly explosives had been. 

For some time there has Been an agitation of 



the nitroglycerine question in Independence, and 
the tit) officials finally decided that too many 
risks were being run in violation of the laws. 
A regulation Western posse hunt was inaugur- 
ated and early on Christmas morning the mar- 
shal, mayor and a posse of armed deputies 
started on a still hunt for the dealers in glycer- 
ine. The search resulted in finding some of the 
stuff in a livery stable in town, and warrants 
were issued for the arrest of two shooters and 
another for John Doe, which was supposed to 
cover anybody connected with the industry. Two 
of the shooters were rounded up, as well as the 
general manager of one of the companies, and 
fines, amounting to about $100 in each case, were 
levied. The money was paid and the shooters 
prepared to go ahead with their work, but were 
surprised to find that the officials had placed 
every portion of their equipment under arrest, 
even to the wagons, horses, harness, shells and 
incidentals. This occasioned another delay, but 
the matter was finally straightened out and op- 
erations were resumed late in the day. 

This is the first prosecution of nitro-glycerine 
shooters, and it is said by the city officials that 
ordinances will now be drawn up covering every 
phase of the dangerous element in this industry. 
There is no doubt of the fact that every oil man 
will heartily co-operate with the officials in their 
efforts to guard against possible danger, and 
when it is considered what fearful results might 
follow the carrying of this stuff into town, it is 
only surprising that step have not before been 
taken to prevent the practice. 



Oil In Nebraska. 



Nebraska may enter the list of oil and gas 
producing States. This possibility was discussed 
recently in a report of the investigations made by 
N. H. Darton, a government geologist, who has 
been at work in the State for six years. 

Mr. Darton has discovered a wrinkle in the 
earth extending from Edgemont, S. D., across 
western Nebraska to Norton, Kan. This wrin- 
kle, tenchincally known as the anti-cline, consists 
of an uplift or arch in the geological structure of 
the plains and almost invariably indicates the 
presence at some depth of oil and gas. 

He is of the opinion that the find will prove of 
great economic importance. The incline is 250 
miles long and from two to six miles wide. Its 
cause is ascribed to a shrinkage of the earth's 
crust. The oil, being light, is known to rise and 
if the pocket in the earth is rightly formed it 
will catch and hold it. All that is necessary is to 
tap the crust and get it. The arch, however, 
may exist without their being oil. Local capi- 
talists have engaged E. H. Barbour, geologist at 
the State University, to make practical tests at 
points chosen by him if he believes, after an ex- 
amination, that there is a possibility of finding 
either. 

The country in which the anti-cline has been 
found is thinly populated, being for the most part 
given over to stock grazing. The surface waters 
are inadequate and uncertain and the home- 
steaders have fought shy of it. A great part cf 
the plains region is known to be underlaid with 
water bearing gravels at no very great d 
and by utilizing the cheap fuels which the gaj 
would furnish, vast areas of this region could be 
reclaimed by irrigating from pumping. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



A Waning Field. 



Reports Published in Eastern Papers Indicate That the Pennsylvania 
Field is Rapidly Failing. No New Gnshers Being Brought in. 



December winds up a notable year in the his- 
tory of the petroleum industry in the eastern 
fields, with a drop in completed wells and new 
operations and an increase in new production. 
The gain in new production was over 1 ,400 
barrels, which brings the new yield very close 
to the figures of the August report. The year 
just ended will be remembered chiefly for the 
great activity displayed in all sections of the pro- 
ducing region, and the small results achieved in 
the way of bringing about the discovery of new 
pools and maintaining the supply of crude pe- 
troleum. 

November recorded a small increase in wells 
completed and new production and showed the 
largest number of rigs and drilling wells in 
progress of any month of the current year. The 
yield from new wells in October was only 
slightly above the 5,000-barrel mark and the 
smallest on record for several years past. At 
the same time the list of October wells completed 
was 137 in excess of the month just ended. The 
new operations at the close of October were the 
same in amount as those at the close of the year. 

The Lima Oil fields of Northwestern Ohio 
and Indiana reveal a decline both in wells com- 
pleted and new production, while the new work 
under way on the last of the month was very 
nearly a standoff with that of November. The 
Buckeye regions showed a decrease of 452 bar- 
rels in new production and the Indiana of 698 
barrels. The combined decline in both fields 
was 288 barrels less than the gain in the new 
production of the Pennsylvania districts. These 
facts show that during the past month the ter- 
ritory under the drill in the Pennsylvania oil 
regions has yielded much better returns than 
usual, while in Ohio and Indiana the drilling 
has been confined to older territory that has been 
drained to a considerable extent by former oper- 
ations. 

In the sections producing Pennsylvania oil 
146 fewer wells were completed in December 
than in November. Nine more wells were com- 
pleted in November than October, while the 
latter month was one ahead of September. Sep- 
tember was 32 behind August, which completed 
more wells than any other month of the present 
year. Nearly 2,200 rigs and drilling wells were 
under way in New York, Pennsylvania, West 
Virginia, Ohio and Indiana fields at the close of 
December, and new wells were completed at the 
rate of 42 every 24 hours. 

The new production from the Pennsylvania 
oil fields was 1,438 barrels more in December 
than in November, while in the Trenton rock 
fields it was 1,150 barrels less. Both sections 
show a falling off of 264 in the number of com- 
pleted wells. In November the new yield from 
Pennsylvania districts was 459 barrels more than 
in October. In the Trenton rock fields there 
was a decline of 17 wells and a falling off of 
1,195 barrels in the new production. This made 
a net decrease of the new yield from both sec- 
tions of 736 barrels, while the decline in the 
number of wells completed was only eight. In 
October there was a net increase of 31 wells 
completed in the Eastern and Western oil fields, 
accompanied by a decline of 1,991 barrels in the 
new production. 

The fields producing Pennsylvania oil com- 



pleted 678 wells in December, inclusive of 131 
dusters and 32 gassers. The average of the 
productive wells was over 13 barrels. In new 
operations there was a decrease of 24, exactly off- 
setting the gain of 24 recorded in the report for 
November. Compared with December, 1902, 
there was an increase of 61 wells completed and 
1,834 barrels production. 

In the Trenton rock oil fields 118 fewer wells 
were completed than in November, and the new 1 
production showed a decline of 1,150 barrels. In 
work under way there was a gain of 1 1 rigs and 
a loss of 10 wells drilling, making a net increase 
of one. In November 17 fewer wells were com- 
pleted than in October and the decline in new 
production was 1,195 barrels. During the 
month there was a gain of 26 rigs and 17 drilling 
wells. The increase in new work was confined 
entirely to the Buckeye districts. Thirty more 
wells were completed in October than in Septem- 
ber and the gain in new production was 231 bar- 
rels. 

For December the two fields combined com- 
pleted 63 fewer wells than were recorded in the 
sections producing Pennsylvania oil, but the out- 
put of the Lima wells was 732 barrels more 
than those completed in the Eastern fields. The 
percentage of dusters was also much smaller. 
The actual number of the new productive wells 
producing Lima oil completed in December was 
556, while the productive wells of the Pennsyl- 
vania oil districts were 515 in number. 

In the Kansas oil fields a general increase dur- 
ing the past month in all classes of field work 
was recorded and the total production for the 
year will exceed 1,000,000 barrels. Two hun- 
dred and five new wells were completed during 
the month and on December 25 it is estimated 
there were 1,590 producing wells in the fields. 
The new operations at this time amounted to 74 
rigs and 175 wells drilling, which was a gain 
of 33 rigs and 11 wells drilling over the figures 
for November. The daily average production 
for December will exceed that of November, 
which is given at nearly 6,000 barrels. 

Operations in the lower southwest fields began 
the year with no new gushers and those that had 
previously gained that distinction on the decline. 
No new finds of special importance attract the 
attention of operators. A glance at the fields 
under development shows but one development 
having producing wells outside of the old dis- 
tricts in counties not previously operated. The 
single exception is the new district near Milton 
on Mud river, Cabell county, West Virginia. 
The impression is growing that a pool of some 
kind will be opened up in that county. From 
an authentic source it has been learned that the 
McCoach Oil and Gas Company's test on the 
F. J. Berkley farm, located one-half mile north 
of the Beckett producer, Indian Fork, produced 
55 barrels from Monday to Wednesday and on 
Thursday had 40 barrels, but had not been agi- 
tated for a day. 

On Little Two Mile creek the Elkton Oil and 
Gas Company is due in the sand to-morrow at 
its test on the Julius Frentle farm. This loca- 
tion is almost a mile due south of the Beckett 
farm well. A mile and one-half northeast of 
the Beckett the test on the J. A. Reece estate is 
due in the sand at the same time. 



There are now about 1,000 barrels of oil stored 
at the Beckett and Berkley farm wells and the 
Eureka Pipe Line Company is. laying a. twcf- 
inch line from the wells to its trunk line to 
Hamlin, a distance of nine miles. The "pipe has 
been strung and for more than half the distance 
has been connected. The line will have been 
completed in time to take care of the oil without 
erecting any more tankage unless the wells now 
drilling come in large producers. 



Russian and American Trade in 
Germany. 



The taxation of Russian petroleum according 
to measure instead of weight and the general in- 
crease of the test point have been advocated. The 
fact that Russian oil is heavier than American oil 
causes the former to pay a higher duty than the 
latter under a weight tariff. The duty on raw 
and refined petroleum in Germany is $1.43 per 
220 pounds; while on the lubricating oil it is 
$2.38 per 220 pounds, including the weight of 
the wrapper. In the former commercial treaty 
with Russia the duty on refined petroleum has 
been levied according to both measure and 
weight. It is stipulated in the protocol to this 
treaty that petroleum for lighting purposes shall 
be taxed, not according to weight but according 
to volume, and that 125 liters (33 gallons) at 
15 degrees Cel. shall equal 100 kilograms (220 
pounds). This decision has found favor in the 
new tariff, so that it will not come under the in- 
fluence of the commercial treaty but will be em- 
ployed independently. The specific gravity of the 
oil on which there is a duty of $2.38 according to 
weight must be 0.8. American petroleum meets 
this requirement, while the specific gravity of 
Russian petroleum is 0.82. Two hundred and 
twenty pounds of American oil amount to 33 
gallons, while the same amount of Russian oil 
will measure 32.25 gallons. The duty on 3 
gallons is about 4j / 2C The taxation according 
to volume is very important as far as Russia is 
concerned. During the period 1 897- 1902, the 
amount of petroleum imported (into Germany) 
from Russia rose from 9,037,482 gallons, valued 
at $357,000, to 41,763,565 gallons, valued at 
$1,886,400; while imports of American oil fell 
from 255,161,072 gallons to 229,825,125 gal- 
lons. In the last year imports of Russian petrol- 
eum reached the value of $4,545,800, of which 
sum $2,558,500 was for lubricating oil; Ameri- 
can petroleum was imported to the value of $15,- 
898,400, of which amount $5,367,800 was for 
lubricating oil. A reduction of the tariff on 
Russian petroleum was opposed in 1893 by the 
German Government on financial grounds. We 
do not know whether they take the same view 
now or not. The figures given above show that 
the import of Russian petroleum can be assisted 
by other means than by a reduction of the tariff. 
At any rate the decreased tariff would only aid 
the imports of petroleum for lighting purposes, 
but lubricating oil and crude petroleum, which 
is imported in considerable amounts for purposes 
of refining, would not be affected thereby. When 
the new tariff is discussed in the Reichstag, the 
question will be considered as to what the effect 
will be of different duties for raw and refined oil 
on the creation of a great German refining in- 
dustry. The beginnings of such an industry are 
already at hand, as the comparatively successful 
development of a few refineries in the last few 
years have shown. Their further extension is 
hindred by the fact that raw petroleum pays the 
same duty as the refined product. 



The subscription price of the Pacific Oil 
RBORTER is $2.50 per year. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



A Summer in the Seward Penin- 
sula. 



In -, listance, n 

Scatt!' Peninsula has beeimic one of the 

most easily accessible par nd the 

difficulties and hardships involved in it* cvplora- 
tions are not regarded by hardened pr 
particularly serious, although every \car adils its 
quota to the roll of those, who hive perished there 
by frost during severe winter storms, and by 
d r o wnin g, expos i n g , it starvation during the 
summer months. A party from the United States 
Geological Survey that spent the summer of 1903 
studying the placer mines of the Seward Penin- 
sula had some interesting experiences. The chief 
of the party was Mr. Arthur J. Collier, assistant 
geologist. The other members of the part] were 
Mr. Frank I.. Miss, field assistant, ami two ex- 
perienced camp hands. Landing at Nome on 
June It), they visited, between that time and 
September 30, when they sailed for Seattle, 
nearly all the important mining camps of Sew- 
ard Peninsula. A 10-stamp quartz mill, mark- 
ing the first attempt to extract gold from the 
rock in this part of Alaska, was seen in success- 
ful operation in the Solomon River region. In 
the York country an occurrence of tin ore in the 
ledges was found, which was the first authentic 
report of tin ore in its bed rock source in this 
region and has attracted considerable attention 
from mining men. The main purpose of the 
party was to study the development made in 
placer mining in the last two years. They found 
that the mining methods in vogue in the Nome 
regions in the earlier days of its discover)' have 
been largely replaced by more improved methods. 
Mining process which would not have been re- 
garded, as practicable then are now accomplished 
facts. • Nearly 100 miles of hydraulic ditches are 
in operation and dredging plants are being used 
on some of the rivers. The practicability of 
working low grade placer deposits has been dem- 
onstrated, and as a result. the possible field of 
mining activities has been extended. 

Geologic, observations were made during the 
summer which will throw added light on the 
complicated structure of the region. In general, 
the bed rocks are old sediments, originally sand- 
stones and limestones, now changed by heat and 
pressure to chists and marbles. In a few places 
fossil remains of the creatures that inhabitated 
that part of the world in past ages were found. 
Among these were corals and other representa- 
tives of tropic seas, now encased in solid rock 
and often buried beneath the frozen gravels on 
the fringe of the polar ice sheets. A much more 
recent epoch in the history of the region is indi- 
cated by fossil remains of the mammoth and 
horse imbedded in the frozen gravels, which are 
also the source of the placer gold. 

This region is almost totally devoid of large 
game like cariboo, moose, and bear, that abound 
inother parts of Alaska, but small game, such as 
ptarmigan and plover, are plentiful, and the 
streams are well stocked with grayling and trout 
that offer the angler good sport. A shotgun and 
fishing rod are important accessories to the camp- 
ing outfit. 

The unusual amount of snow last winter de- 
layed the coming of spring and during the first 
part of the season grass for the horses was very 
scant. An interesting event for the pack train 
while they were at Teller was the arrival of a 
colt presented to the party by the brazen-faced 
mare. All the other horses crowded around and 
were very proud of the new arrival. It was also 
a great curosity to the Eskimos and to the Mahle- 
mute dogs, who had never seen anything of the 
kind before. During the night five of these 
wolfish brutes attacked the horses, who stood at 



round a deserted cabin and fought tor the 
life of the little one. but they were finally worn 
out and the dogs killed the before help 

arrived. 

rh of the Benddeben M u an 

trained b\ the Ku/itrin River, there 

broad belt of lowland tundra, which at its east- 
ern end is covered with a thin bed of lava. It 
necessary (or the part] to cross this low- 
land, and in order to study the lava beds they 
directed their course toward the center of them 
inspire of the warnings of old prospectors that 
to cross the lava with horses was impossible. The 
lava was found as reported, a layer of black 
slag spread over the tundra with tongues and 
fingers reaching out down the valley, showing 
plainly how the black rock, melted in the bowels 
of the earth, (lowed out over the tundra like thick 
molasses and hardened there. The tongues of 
lava were crossed with no accident more serious 
than the fall of a horse into a crevasse. The 
poor beast hung with his hind legs dangling in 
the narrow crack vainly trying to reach the bot- 
tom, twenty feet below. He was fortunately 
rescued through the united efforts of the entire 
party, who lifted him out of his perilous position 
by means of a generous use of his tail as a handle 
and the help of a rope placed around the after 
part of his body. 

The economic results of the work done by the 
Collier party will be published early in 1904, 
while the purely scientific results will appear 
separately in a later report. 



Big Oil Land Deal. 

Saturday one of the largest deals ever consu- 
mated in the Buckeye field was completed, when 
the Ohio Oil Company took over the holdings of 
the Exchange Oil Company, one of the most ex- 
tensive operating concerns in the field. The sale 
includes 4,000 acres of land, 272 producing wells 
and a daily production of 600 bbls. The consid- 
eration is said to be $600,000. The property is 
located in Wood, Hancock and Allen counties 
and 400 acres of land that was held in fee. The 
most prolific farms are near Portage in Wood 
county and a large acreage of the territory is 
undeveloped. It will be remembered that the 
Exchange Oil Company purchased the holdings 
of the Palmer Oil Company for $275,000, short- 
ly after being formed about four years ago, and 
since then it has been a money maker from the 
word go. The company is composed mostly of 
Bowling Green parties, and among them are 
Myron Chase, M. B. Shidester, Earl Merry, 
James Hickox, the firm of Reen & Merry and 
the Exchange Banking Company, of Bowling 
Green. 



Discovery of An Immense Coal De- 
posit In Japan. 



Kobe, December 15. — An immense coal de- 
posit was recently discovered in Teshio district, 
Hakkaido, the extreme northern island of Japan. 
The field covers an area of more than 40,000 
acres (60,000,000 tonbos) and the average 
thickness of the seams is over 86 feet and the 
superintendent of the Sapporo Colliery Bureau 
estimates the total quantity of coal contained in 
the belt at 2,680 million tons, representing 6,700 
million dollars, gold, figuring the value of coal 
at $2.50 gold per ton. This coal field alone will 
be able to furnish 800,000 tons of coal per an- 
num for 3350 years hence. Eight hundred thou- 
sand tons is the quantity consumed in Japan at 
the present time and the bulk of the coal is at 
present furnished by the collieries in Kinshin, the 
southernmost island of Japan. The coal is pro- 
nounced by the Sappo or Colliery Bureau as most 
fitted for bunker use. 



Gas, Coke and Tar Products. 

A rather new feature in the volume for 1902 
of the Mineral Resources of the United States 
published by the united States Geological Sur- 
vej is an article by Mr. Edward \Y. Parker 011 
the production of gas, coke, tar, and ammonia at 
■ >rks ami in retort coke owns. 

In making its annual canvass ot the coal- 
mining and coke making industries tor 1902, the 
Survey has extended its inquiries in order to cover 
till plants producing gas an, I coke from coal and 
covering tar and ammonia. A somewhat similar 
canvass was made in 1898 by Dr. William B. 
Phillips. At that time returns were received 
from 433 companies manufacturing gas from 
coal. The statistics for 1902 include reports 
from 533 companies, including those operating 
retort-oven coking plants. 

In 1898 the 433 companies from which re- 
turns were received deported a total of 2,042,- 
698 short tons of bituminous coal carbonized, 
producing 19,4(59,464,957 cubic feet of gas. Of 
this amount 18,431,201,414 cubic feet were sold 
for illuminating and heating purposes, leaving 
1,038,263,543 cubic feet unaccounted for. The 
gas "unaccounted for" is probably lost through 
leakage, fire, or other accident. These figures for 
1898 do not include the production from 520 by- 
product coke ovens, in which 402,297 tons of 
coal were carbonized and which yielded 294,445 
short tons of coke. 

In 1902 the returns from 533 companies, in- 
cluding the operations of 1663 by-product coke 
ovens, show that 5,015,511 tons of coal were car- 
bonized, which yielded 30,764,625,332 cubic feet 
of gas. Of this product 29,079,073,555 cubic 
feet were sold, leaving 1,685,551,777 cubic feet 
lost or unaccounted for. About 2,000,000 tons 
of the total coal carbonized were used in by-pro- 
duct ovens. 

In 1898 the production of ammonia, reduced 
to its equivalent in sulphate, amounted to 31,- 
102,796 pounds, of tar to 28,407,798 gallons. In 
1902 these amounts had grown to 67,248,686 
pounds and 53,i7i>733 gallons. 

The total production of coke in 1898 from gas 
works and retort-oven plants was 1,510,724 
short tons, of which 294,445, short tons, were 
produced in by-product coke ovens, leaving 1,- 
974,'75 tons as the output from gas w-orks in 
1902, against 1,216,279 tons in 1898. 

The aggregate value of all the products ob- 
tained from the distillation of coal in gas works 
or retort ovens in 1902 was $43,869,440. 
About two-thirds of this amount, or $29,342,881, 
was represented by the value of the gas produced. 
The value of the coke produced was $1 1,267,608, 
while the tar was worth, at the works, $1,873,- 
966. Most of the ammonia produced was sold in 
the form of ammoniacal liquor. The total 
quantity sold was 49,490,609 gallons and was 
worth, at the works, $1,065,300. In addition 
to this there was an actual production of n,- 
276,502 pounds of sulphate, which sold for 
$319,685. 

Comparatively little progress in the manu- 
facture of chemical products from coal tar has 
been made in this country. Although we are 
producing over 50,000,000 gallons of coal tar 
annually, the principal uses made of it are for the 
manufacture of roofiing paper, the creosoting of 
lumber, and for the preparation of street-paving 
material. At the same time we are importing 
millions of dollars' worth of chemicals obtained 
from coal tar as a raw material. The coal tar 
produced in this country in 1902 was worth at 
first hand $1,873,966. In the fiscal year ended 
June 30, 1902, the coal tar products imported 
into the United States were worth, at points of 
shipment, $7,494,340. Including duty, freight, 
and other costs, their total value in the wholsale 
markets of this country probably amounted to 
about $12,000,000. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Asphaltum In Storage. 

Thousands of Tons Awaiting a Market==Their Value is Discussed-Failure 

of the Asphalt Trust. 



Thousands of tons of asphalt are now stored in 
this State. The trouble in disposing of asphalt 
has been due to the fact that the asphalt trust 
has virtually controlled the market and kept the 
cities using the product for streets tied down to 
the Trinidad rock asphalt. Now the asphalt trust 
has failed in spite of the immense power wielded 
by it and enormous and profitable business, the 
failure being done, it is said by many, to the in- 
fluence of the Standard Oil Company and there 
is considerable speculation as its probable effects 
upon the oil industry. 

Regarding this a local correspondent of the 
Los Angeles Herald writes as follows: 

A little calculation on the amount of refined 



making enormous profits and had the municipal 
treasury of nearly every large city in the United 
States under its control. Apparently the trust 
had all the cities tied down to the use of the 
Trinidad asphalt in all of the paving contracts; 
yet for some unknown reason it has gone to pieces. 
Oil men in California have shaken their heads 
and said, "Standard Oil Company," as oil men 
are prone to lay at the door of this corporation 
all the mysterious things that happen. Perhaps 
the oil man is a little afraid of the Standard and 
accuses it of a great many things of which it is 
not guilty, but the oil man is prejudiced that 
way, for he has had so many experiences with the 
octopus that he is like the savage in the idea of 



not been idle for the past three years since the 
California oil fields were brought to the atten- 
tion of the world. 

Those men who should know the oil business 
and possibilities better than any one else think 
that the beginning is only in sight, and that the 
sale of asphalt for paving purposes will be greater 
than any other product of the heavy oils. From 
information on the subject it is generally con- 
ceded that somewhere in the neighborhood of 6,- 
000,000 square yards of asphalt pavement were 
laid in the United States during 1903, and of 
that the greater part was laid from the rock 
asphalts and not from the asphalts refined from 
crude oil. Where the two have been tested to- 
gether in every instance it has been shown that 
the refined asphalts, where properly laid, were far 
superior to the rock product, but on account of 
the Asphalt trust, having almost absolute con- 
trol of all the contracts, it has been almost im- 
possible to introduce the California product, and 
where under these difficulties a test has been re- 
ceived the rock asphalt people have always been 
on hand with every weapon in their power to 
make a failure of the refined asphalt. In many 















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General View in the Kern River Field 



products produced from a barrel of Kern county 
oil will show anyone that by far the largest 
product left after the oil has been put through 
the different refining processes is asphalt. The 
matter of a market and sale for the refined and 
lubricating and illuminating oils is easy, as mar- 
ket can be found for an unlimited quantity of 
this; but as the per cent of this product in the 
average heavy oils cannot be more than 65 per 
cent of the whole, this leaves at the least one- 
third for which some market must be found, or 
this one-third left on hand will absorb the en- 
tire profit of the business. 

Oil men who have followed the business all 
their lives and who are in the habit of following 
the lead of that wisest and most successful cor- 
poration ever known to the world, the Standard 
Oil Company, have wrestled much with the prob- 
lem of what was going to be done with all the 
immense quantities of asphalt that would be left 
when the oils had been refined. Some of them 
think they see a great light breaking in when 
they notice some of the things that have de- 
veloped in the past year, as detailed by the press 
of the country concerning the failure of the so- 
called "Asphalt trust." There was apparently 
no reason for the failure of this trust, as it was 



attributing everything that is bad to his devil, and 
the devil of the oil man is the Standard Oil Com- 
pany, for it has ruined thousands of oil men, and 
some of them two or three times over. 

The reasoning of the oil man is as follows: 
He says that the Standard Oil Company is in 
the habit of looking forward not for one year 
or two or three of them, but for ten or twenty 
and that it knew long before the big refinery at 
Richmond or the contemplated one at Bakersfield 
was spoken of the great quantity of asphalt that 
would be on the market, and as is the habit of 
this corporation, it knew where the market was 
to be and what the price of asphalt was going to 
be, and for the past few years it has sought to 
control the asphalt business of the country, and 
when the big refineries on the Pacific Coast got 
to work turning out their thousands of tons of 
asphalt daily the market would be ready and 
waiting to consume a